Great War Theatre

Examiner of Plays' Summary:

At last a really good play about spies, with possible people and incidents and without any foolish violence of language. The plot, as is usual with good detective stories and plays, is full of incident and a summary hardly does justice to it. Briefly, however, it is as follows. The forces on one side are a lady who runs a superior boarding house on the coast, with an English name, but a German and the widow of a German officer; her son having the same English name, an official in the admiralty; a German governess and a German waiter: these are engaged in the usual business of spies, making drawings of military positions, sending documents by pigeons, making signals and so forth. On the other side are an English government detective of a high order posing as a foolish young man and under disfavour for not having enlisted, who has come down to observe the others and an English woman who is in [on] the secret and helps him. The other characters are a foolish old JP who muddles things and his daughter, in love with and loved by Brent, the secret service man. To describe the various convolutions of these people and how Brent defeats the alien manoeuvres, would take many pages. The culmination is when Brent and Carl (the German lady's son) confront one another and Brent prevents Carl burning down the house as a signal to a German submarine and himself signals to English vessels which destroy her. Then, of course, Brent's character is cleared and he is made happy. It is all quite exciting: a good detective play plus the topical interest of spies, and refreshing in that the latter are credible people. Recommended for license. G. S. Street

Researcher's Summary:

The text of the play is available online at https://archive.org/details/manwhostayedatho00terr/page/n4/mode/2up. The Man Who Stayed at Home (TMWSAH) had a London run of 587 performances, produced by J. E. Vedrenne and Dennis Eadie, from 10 December 1914 to 18 March 1916 at the Royalty Theatre and then, with a change of cast, from 20 March to 15 April 1916 at the Apollo. The Bioscope, 22 July 1915, quoted from 30 reviews of the play and from two of the recently released film version. Two touring companies, one under Vedrenne and Eadie and one under E. Taylor Platt, took the play round the provinces as early as February 1915, the former only until the end of the year but the latter for much longer. 1916 saw, as well as the conclusion of the play's initial London run, the Taylor Platt tour continue until a summer break; a one-off charity performance at the Marlborough Theatre, London, on 5 July; a revival of the play at the Royalty Theatre in July/August; and two touring companies, designated 'red' and 'blue' , sent off by Taylor Platt in July/August for an autumn season. In 1917 Taylor Platt's 'red' company toured from the end of January until early December but the 'blue' company seems to have ceased in April. There was a charity performance by the Vaudeville D.C. on 25 January; performances by an amateur group in Finchley in March; and in July performances by the Garrison Theatre company for soldiers in a newly opened theatre at the army training camp near Ripon. In 1918 a Taylor Platt company toured the play from the end of January to the first week in December. The authors, in an interview published in The Globe, 11 December 1914, said they wrote the play to highlight both the dangers posed by German spies and ‘the action of some silly women in distributing white feathers and such-like badges of cowardice to men who, for all they knew, might have had the most powerful reasons for not enlisting’ (the lead character in TMWSAH uses a white feather that he has been given to clean his pipe). Both points, especially the former, were picked up by reviewers. The play was renamed The White Feather when it was staged in America. Reviewers who may have doubted that it was appropriate to stage plays about the war at all nevertheless approved of TMWSAH because it was amusing as well as exciting, humorous as well as dramatic, to the point of being a melodrama or even a farce, and because it did not show the actual horrors of war. Those points were stressed by newspapers, often in similar terms that were clearly provided by the touring companies themselves. Even if some reviewers thought that the spy and white feather elements of the plot were no longer directly relevant by 1917, they thought the play exciting and amusing enough to be still worth seeing. One newspaper evidently thought that Germany's resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare in February 1917 added to the topicality of the attempts of the spies in the play to signal to U-boats off the coast (Hull Daily Mail, 13 February 1917). TMWSAH was sometimes preferred to other early war plays such as J. M. Barrie’s Der Tag, Chester Bailey Fernald’s The Day Before The Day and Stephen Phillips’ Armageddon.

Licensed On: 18 Nov 1914

License Number: 3025

British Library Reference: LCP1914/33

British Library Classmark: Add MS 66081 Q

Performances

DateTheatreType
1 Dec 1914 Royalty Theatre, LondonUnknown Licensed Performance
10 Dec 1914 Royalty Theatre, LondonProfessional
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‘The full cast of The Man Who Stayed at Home, the three-act play, by Lechmere Worrall and J. E. Harold Terry, which will be produced at the Royalty on Thursday, December 10, is as follows:- Christopher Brent, Mr. Dennis Eadie; Carl Sanderson, Mr. Malcolm Cherry; John Preston, J. P., Mr. Hubert Harben; Percival Pennicuick [sic – Pennicuik], Mr. Stanley Logan; Fritz, Mr. E. Henry Edwards; Corporal Atkins, Mr. Campbell Gullan; Mrs. Sanderson, Mrs. Robert Brough; Miriam Leigh, Miss Ruth Mackay; Molly Preston, Miss Isobel Elsom; Miss Myrtle, Miss Jean Cadell; Fraulein Schroeder, Miss Mary Jerold; Daphne Kidlington, Miss Elizabeth Risdon' (The Stage, 3 December 1914). ‘Let it be a lesson to all young girls who go about presenting white fathers to young men who they think should be at the front. For Brent was very much in the front, and yet he was the man who stayed at home ... [the play] so nicely manages to give us what we are all thinking and talking about without the impertinence of obtruding those bigger things for which just now there is no place on the stage. The play was excellently performed. The Brent of Mr. Eadie, the Sanderson of Mr. Cherry, the Fritz of Mr. Edwards, and the Fräulein Schroeder of Miss Jerrold being conspicuous efforts in acting of all-round accomplishment’ (The Globe, 11 December 1914). 'The German spy question - particularly in relation to the East Coast - is in the public mind, and has been for some months past, so the authors ... said to themselves, “Let’s write a play about German spies on the East Coast.” One might almost add, “No sooner said than done,” for the shows signs of haste in execution, and it would be possible to point out incongruities in the story, but they did not seem to matter. The house was willing to be thrilled, and thrilled it was ... Altogether an admirable performance of an ingenious piece of genteel melodrama; no wonder that the reception was enthusiastic’ (Westminster Gazette, 11 December 1914). 'The authors ... have put upon the stage with some ingenuity a sort of magazine story about German spies and English detectives ... There is no very serious pretence at drama in the affair, but some of the characterisation is good, and the story is told with enough skill to produce a number of exciting situations' (The Scotsman, 11 December 1914). ‘We have more than once during the past four months expressed the opinion that the less the Theatre comments upon the war the better it will be for the Theatre; for, in commenting in any serious way upon a reality so stupendous, it is almost impossible for a machine like the stage to avoid giving the impression of trifling – and no impression could be less acceptable at a time like the present. We cordially allow, however, that “The Man Who Stayed at Home” ... is harmless. Its few serious moments are rather silly; but it has many others that are frankly comic, and these promise extremely well ... the reception given to the most “exciting” incidents by last night’s audience showed that the house was accepting it as Farce ... We venture say that the more the play is acted on farce lines the greater will be its success ... it should have a good “run” - if the farce note is kept well sounded' (Pall Mall Gazette, 11 December 1914). 'So much has been heard of late of the machinations of German spies in this country that it not to be wondered at that the subject has at last afforded scope for treatment on the stage. Whether the theatre is the proper place for dealing with matters of such great importance is another question, but happily no objection can be taken to the way in which a German spy play is presented at the Royalty ... There is a plot, course, but it is of secondary interest in a play of this nature ... While the “spy mania” lasts, the play is certain to have a good run’ (Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 12 December 1914). ‘In the ordinary way we do not look for any very striking lessons from a comedy drama, for that is how the new play at the Royalty should be described. But “The Man Who Stayed at Home” ... is full of meaning. It tells us not to judge hastily those who do not happen to fulfil our particular ideas of patriotic service, and it puts on the stage some striking truths of the spy system and the spy danger ... This is going to be the play of the season, that we venture to predict with confidence; and it is going to convince all who visit the Royalty that the man with the monocle and the fatuous talk may not be the fool that he looks, and that it is a dangerous thing to distribute white feathers in judgment on those of whose circumstances and whose work you know nothing' (The People, 13 December 1914). '“The Man Who Stayed at Home,” … treats lightly though with an ostensible seriousness which I suspect to be a “box-office” ruse on the part of its clever authors, one of the dailiest of our wartime topics, the ever-present terror of spies' (Truth, 16 December 1914). ‘Schoolboy adjectives such as “ripping” and “topping” and “jolly good” appear to be the most applicable to “The Man Who Stayed at Home” ... Most of us, thank God, have something of the schoolboy in us to the end of our days, and it is this “something” that makes us rejoice, without on, in thrills and surprises and deeds of “derring-do.” Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie have got a real “thriller” this time, there is not a dull moment in one of the three acts. By the end of each act we are so breathless that we have no desire left to be critical, figuratively are carried off our feet by this delightful tale of foolish German spies and clever British detectives. Never even in the most robust days of the “penny dreadful” have there been such wicked, bloodthirsty spies ... There can very little doubt that “The Man Who Stayed at Home” will “catch on” tremendously ... It is so jolly and light-hearted, and is so brilliantly played with exactly the right spirit by an exceptionally clever company. The play goes with a splendid “bang” from start to finish, and the burlesque of melodrama is delicately done and with so much zest that the actors and audience are almost immediately on terms of the utmost good-fellowship' (The Era, 16 December 1914). 'The Man who Stayed at Home is, indeed, a blend of light comedy with drawing-room melodrama, and its treatment of the great and burning Spy question is interesting enough, when it seems either designedly or unintentionally farcical ... There are [many] sensations, theatrical as well as semi-scientific, in a piece smartly, if not quite convincingly, put together, and marked by a number of bright lines, topical hits, rapid and ingeniously “tricky” curtains, and entertaining, though superficial character studies' (The Stage, 17 December 1914). 'I should imagine, after seeing “The Man Who Stayed at Rome,” … that there is no doubt whatever about its popularity. I cannot conceive a play more likely to appeal to all and sundry at this time, nor one that could amuse and interest more than does this ... the play is full of incident - and topical incident, too. It may be that the authors rather poke fun at us over the spy business; but whether we believe in spies or whether we do not, we all of us are interested in the doings of their spies. It is all so ridiculous, so easy, and yet so plausible ... The play was received more enthusiastically than any play I have seen this year, and that it should be the success of this somewhat trying season there is no doubt. At any other time than this there would be no shadow of doubt of its success. It is bright, entertaining, intensely exciting, and most topical. What more can anyone desire?’ (Clarion, 18 December 1914). ‘Messrs. Lechmere Worrall and Harold Terry’s play may perhaps be described as a light melodrama. It is, of course, supremely topical, and is just probable enough to be interesting, without being sufficiently so to be disturbing ... There are plenty of thrills, relieved by unforced humour and lightened by the pretty love interest that runs through the play ... The piece has just the touch that is needed the moment, and should do well’ (Sporting Times, 19 December 1914). ‘Once more fiction has anticipated fact. It will be remembered that the concealment of a wireless apparatus in a chimney plays an important part in the plot of the war play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home" ... Now such an installation has actually been discovered in a house in Liverpool. The discovery was due to the alertness of a woman member of the sanitary staff of the Liverpool Corporation. While visiting a house on the outskirts of the city she saw something in the fireplace which aroused her suspicions. She informed the police, who at once visited the house and found that the fireplace contained a complete wireless installation’ (The Globe, 22 December 1914). 'The Man Who Stayed at Home is the most exciting dramatic piece which the war has so far produced. It is amusing, too, and quite exceptionally well acted by everyone ... This play will run the length of the war, and probably a long time after’ (The Tatler, 23 December 1914). ‘This play deals with one of the great problems of the present war, the spy question. In short, this play, without showing any of the horrors of battle, brings home to its audience the fact that England is actually at war, and should not be missed by any playgoer who loves fine acting and “a thrill”' (The Tatler, 23 December 1914). The Man Who Stayed At Home ‘is a merry little play about German spies and British spy-catchers. It is such a comforting play, too, for it shows how catchable these German malefactors really are ... It is worth noting that whereas in times of peace a spy play (and particularly the chief lady spy) would have to be treated in grim earnest, now that war is actually raging a serious spy play would be a failure. We enter the theatre in order to escape from our real world for an hour or two, and are annoyed if we find it has crept round through the stage door to confront us across the foot lights’ (Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, 26 December 1914). ‘With one exception we are still without a war play of any merit. We cannot, of course, take “The Flag Lieutenant” seriously - West-End drawing-room stuff dished up with a naval sauce and some fuzzy-wuzzy shooting. The Royalty play about “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is the ordinary stage-detective story cast in a war setting to fit the moment. Both plays give Mr. O. B. Clarence and Mr. Dennis Eadie opportunities for fine acting’ (Daily Herald, 9 January 1915). ‘The success of “ The Man Who Stayed at Home” shows that the war in its lighter aspects makes a strong appeal (Truth, 13 January 1915). ‘The play is admirably acted, and is extremely amusing, just the thing, in fact, for the man or woman suffering from depression or gloom or any of those other unpleasant conditions of mind so much in evidence at the present time’ (War Office Times and Naval Review, 15 January 1915). ‘The King and Queen have expressed their desire to attend the special matinee of “The Man Who Stayed at Home” which is be given in aid of the Officers’ Families Fund on May 11. The performance will take place at the Palace Theatre. It was felt that, in view of the importance of the occasion, a larger audience might be expected than could conveniently be accommodated at the Royalty Theatre (Globe, 1 April 1915). There is a leaflet advertising the performance at https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/31675. The occasion was reported in several newspapers, including The Stage, 13 May 1915, which noted, 'The entire gallery had been purchased by the Queen and was occupied by 400 wounded soldiers, who wore brought from the various London hospitals in motor-cars ... the total amount realised was £1,330'. ‘Two things were certain when the war broke out. One was that, if the theatre was to prosper, the war must be left alone by dramatists. The other was that the day of what is called bedroom comedy was over … [However,] theatre after theatre sought to attract the public with serious war dramas. The result of the policy will probably cause its abandonment. The success of “The Man Who Stayed at Home” does not affect the argument, as this play is almost entirely farce, and is played as such’ (Pall Mall Gazette, 22 June 1915). ‘“The Man who Stayed at Home” has swelled Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie’s banking account to the tune of some £15,000’(Sporting Times, 17 July 1915). 'With the exception of “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” which is without the large and serious purpose that marked the poetic “Armageddon” [by Stephen Phillips] or the melodramatic “The Day Before the Day,” [by Chester Bailey Fernald] the war plays left the public cold, or else here and there a little resentful. Great themes demand great masters’ (Birmingham Mail, 28 July 1915). The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, 21 August 1915, was critical of Stephen Phillips’ play Armageddon: ‘I should have expected him, as a poet and a man of letters, to have the feeling, without in the least desiring to defend Germans at the present day, that their behaviour is not a good subject for either melodrama or farce … A more successful treatment of the subject is found in The Man Who Stayed at Home, which has been running to great lengths. There is a lighter touch about this which commends it, and an air of burlesque of spy drama which is entertaining’. ‘A noticeable feature of the present condition of the theatrical world is the unpopularity of the war play - that is, the play dealing in a more or less realistic fashion with the dismal state of affairs out there. Many optimistic managers, at the outbreak of the war, imagined that they had only to produce a play dealing with the killing of Germans by Englishmen, and the public would flock to their doors. But there was no flock. Many things account for this; some of them ought to have occurred to the misguided optimists in question. To begin with, realism has never been popular in this country … Of all the crop of war plays with which we began the season the only one that has made good is The Man Who Stayed at Home. But this piece has succeeded not because it is a war play, but because it is a good play’ (The Bystander, 25 August 1915). ‘The war has yet to evolve a really great play ... if we except “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” “Armageddon” [by Stephen Phillips] … and a playlet by Sir J. M. Barrie [“Der Tag”], which was dependent on the author’s reputation as much its own worth for its length of run, the British drama has benefited nothing from the war … playwrights have missed a golden opportunity during the past year in not evolving a stirring recruiting drama after the style, for instance, of “The Englishman’s Home”‘ (Edinburgh Evening News, 8 October 1915). ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” has been called war play, but it triumphs, in my judgment because of its characterisation rather than its situations. The main interest of audiences at the Royalty Theatre is undoubtedly centred in the character development of the secret service agent who carries on his patriotic operations under cover of being a “slacker”‘ (Horace A. Vachell in the Daily Mirror, 23 October 1915). ‘I met Mrs. Vedrenne on Tuesday afternoon at the Royalty Theatre, when, by way of celebrating the 365th performance of “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” the audience was composed of wounded soldiers from various hospitals round and about London. She, like everybody connected with the theatre, was perfectly delighted at the appreciation shown by the wounded men’ (Daily Mirror, 28 October 1915). ‘In England [the war] it all too personal and too close for us to find anything attractive in a presentment of its horrors on the stage. The only play which has dealt with the war and which has had any degree of success at all has been The Man who Stayed at Home. But then, the attack and counter-attack by German spies is a theme which, though it deals with war times, has none of war’s sanguinary awfulness. It is just a detective drama with a national interest. Indeed, The Man who Stayed at Home is very nearly a war farce - if you can imagine such a thing. It is the kind of play which would have been a success even had it been written and produced in the piping times of peace. There is nothing in it to bring vividly to mind war’s terrible wastefulness, its awful butchery, its utter desolation’ (The Tatler, 1 December 1915). ‘It was inevitable that the play inspired directly by the war should make its appearance in the theatre, but of the four which have been produced only “The Man Who Stayed at Home” has survived. Sir James Barrie’s one-act play, “Der Tag,” as well as the late Stephen Phillips’ “Armageddon,” enjoyed neither a long life nor popularity. Both were gloomy, and the latter, although containing the elements of poetic imagination and dramatic insight, was too scrappy in its incidents, too inclusive to appeal to a public who has in these days especially, a desire for the tangible in the theatre. C. B. Fernald’s “The Day Before the Day” ... failed entirely to suit the mood of the theatre-goer, and was quickly relegated to the list of the unsuccessful efforts’ (The People, 2 January 1916). The Man Who Stayed at Home is ‘a marvellous exception to the general unpopularity of war plays and espionage plots’ (Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 4 January 1916). The Man Who Stayed at Home was ‘the only pseudo-war play to do any good’ (The Sportsman, 6 January 1916). 'Mr. Dennis Eadie by the production of “The Man Who Stayed at Home," which has kept the public entertained for five hundred nights, and Mr. Bransby Williams by his sketch, “The Lounger,” have stimulated recruiting’ (The Era, 9 February 1916). ‘We have had a few war sketches at the variety theatres; but so far the only successful play with a war interest has been The Man Who Stayed at Home, which of course does not deal with any incident of actual warfare. As a matter of fact, the public hears, reads, and experiences quite enough of the war tragedy in everyday life, and is glad to forget it for a while in hours of relaxation’ (Cheltenham Looker-On, 18 March 1916). An advertisement in the Daily Mirror, Saturday 18 March, confirms that that was the last day when The Man Who Stayed at Home was performed at the Royalty Theatre and that it was transferring to the Apollo the following Monday.
1 Feb 1915 King's Theatre, HammersmithProfessional
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The Era, 3 February 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Vedrenne and Eadie Co.) as On The Road from 1 February at the King’s Theatre, Hammersmith.
8 Feb 1915 Lyceum, IpswichProfessional
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The Era, 3 and 10 February 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt Co.) as On The Road from 8 February at the Lyceum, Ipswich. Also The Stage, 11 February 1915.
8 Feb 1915 Grand Theatre, HullProfessional
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The Hull Daily Mail, 4 February 1915, advertised at the Grand Theatre from Monday 8 February ‘The Vedrenne and Eadie Company in “The Man Who Stayed At Home,” the successful Royalty Theatre spy play. George Tully as “The Man Who Stayed At Home,” Mary Merral as “Molly Preston.” The Play of the Moment. Thrilling. Amusing’. The Hull Daily Mail, 9 February 1915, published a lengthy review of the play: ‘a cheery, sensible and often exciting drama … One noticed the becoming khaki all over the theatre; unless we mistake not, it is a tint that will become more prominent as the week progresses … a quick-pulsed, manly, and well-knit play which remains at a high level of good workmanship … The acting is proficient throughout. Mr Geo. Tully is very diverting as Brent, who uses his monocle and pipe eloquently (to descend for a moment to details). Miss Esty Marsh (a daughter of Madame Alice Esty) plays the part of Mrs Leigh with charm and vividness. Molly Preston is prettily impersonated by Miss Mary Merrall. An able character is that of Miss Lola Duncan as Fraulein Schroeder. Mr Charles Grenville’s Fritz is a capital type of foreigner. Others who render valuable service are Miss Mary Relph as Mrs Sanderson, Miss Florence Harwood as Miss Myrtle, Miss Valerie Richards as Daphne Kidlington, Mr George Martin as John Preston, J.P., Mr George Bailey as Carl Sanderson, Mr A. R. Whatmore as Private Pennienick [sic - Pennicuik], and Mr George Hewetson as Corporal Atkins’.
15 Feb 1915 Lyceum Theatre, SheffieldProfessional
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‘… Besides being full of excitement and topical interest, the play is funny throughout’ (Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 12 February 1915). ‘At a tragic time like this one has a natural prejudice against drama dealing with it, for the war is too real and too much with us for it to seem the proper subject at present for artistic treatment. But much before the end of the first act of “The Man who Stayed at Home,” which was presented at the Lyceum Theatre, last night, that prejudice had been dissipated. It is a play all about German spies, seemingly as unpromising a subject as one could conceive, but the treatment is so clever and tactful that there is nothing in it untimely or out of place. The construction of the plot is remarkably ingenious and the strong permeation of humour artfully avoids the danger of melodrama.. Yet the play holds with its thrilling interest … “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is a striking recruitment play … those who want a laugh and a thrill at the same time will … not miss “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘. The cast was George Tully, George Martin, Gordon Bailey, Charles Grenville, Mary Merrall, Esty Marsh, Lola Duncan, Mary Relph who were members of the Vedrenne and Eadie company (Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 12 February 1915). Also reviewed in The Stage, 18 February 1915.
15 Feb 1915 Theatre Royal, NorwichProfessional
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The Era, 10 February 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt Co.) as On The Road from 15 February at the T.R., Norwich. Also The Stage, 11 February 1915.
22 Feb 1915 Prince's Theatre, ManchesterProfessional
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Previewed in the Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 20 February 1915: the play 'brings vividly home the perils of the German spy danger … strong emotionalism and humour are nicely blended’. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” is constructed on lines which are reminiscent of the author of “Sherlock Holmes” ... The play is most ingeniously constructed. It begins to grip one after the first few minutes, and once gained, the grip is never relaxed. Amusement and excitement are blended admirably' (Manchester Evening News, 23 February 1915). ‘Messrs. Lechmere Worrall and Harold Terry are to be congratulated on having produced a capital little play which fulfils the true intent of drama - to delight its auditors. “The Man Who Stayed at Home” holds all the elements which, if we are inclined to be frank, we must admit have made the most potent appeal to us, as healthy human animals, since the time of boyhood, and in our lustiest moods make the greatest appeal to us still. To outwit one’s enemy, to pit one’s brains and one’s strength against hostile craft, and to win through the struggle – the bases of human happiness are here. Such are the elements of the play that was so capably enacted at the Prince’s Theatre last night. The authors have imparted a sentimental interest to their drama, but it is, happily, slight. What really keeps the audience agog while the play is proceeding is the ever lively interest in plots and counter-plots, the constant tying of knots and the unravelling of the same, the running against brick walls and promptly vaulting them or slipping through an unnoticed gate ... It is not “intellectual,” and it is not at all informative, save as to Morse code and wireless installations, but it is capital fun and quite thrilling’ (Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 23 February 1915). This was the Vedrenne and Eadie company since the Taylor Platt company was in Reading this week.
22 Feb 1915 County Theatre, ReadingProfessional
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‘Bombs and submarines, plans and German spies, secret “wireless” outfits and carrier pigeons, these are a few of the many ingredients that go to make up the thrilling play of the moment, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” as presented this week at the County Theatre. As a bright exhilarating play there has been none to equal it in the town for many months, and its refreshing humour and exciting episodes have deservedly won for it the appreciation of crowded houses throughout the week … Well conceived and admirably produced, “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is a play that everyone should see. Of course, as is easily understood, he is not really the man who stays at home, but the real man must have been somewhere about, for at the end the orchestra played “We don’t want to lose you, but we think you ought to go …”‘. The cast was Charles Esdale (Brent), Edith Cuthbert (Daphne Kidlington), Christine Jensen (Molly Preston), Frances Davie (Miriam Leigh), Hilda Gregory (Mrs Sanderson), Goodwin Nock (Carl), Russell Bendle (Fritz), Dorothy Hall (Fräulein Schroeder), J. Farries Moss (Pennicuck) [sic – Pennicuik], Christine Jensen (Miss Myrtle), Harold Greaves (Corporal Atkins), Grahame Herington (John Preston). Reading Observer, 27 February 1915. The actors were members of the E. Taylor Platt company.
1 Mar 1915 Theatre Royal, BirminghamProfessional
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'“The Man who Stayed at Home” is the sort of play that attracts men to a theatre. It has sense and incident - thrills concrete, not abstract. The audience can see what it is all about, and gleefully watch the unfolding of a fascinating spy drama that looks real' (Evening Despatch, 2 March 1915). 'Last night’s audience probably enjoyed nothing better than the snub administered by the general body of boarders to the young lady who presented “the man who stayed at home” with the emblem of cowardice - which, by the way, he promptly applied to the useful purpose of cleaning the stem of his pipe! The play may be aptly described as one of thrills and laughter, and Mr. George Tully, in the title role, is largely responsible for both' (Birmingham Daily Gazette, 2 March 1915). The Stage, 4 March 1915, reviewed the production, mentioning cast members George Tully, Gordon Bailey, Georg Martin, A. E. Whatmore, Charles Grenville, Mary Relph, Esty Marsh, Mary Merrall, Florence Harwood, Lola Duncan, and Valerie Richards, who were members of the Vedrenne and Eadie company.
1 Mar 1915 ?, GrimsbyProfessional
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The actress Miss Hilda Gregory, who was playing Mrs Sanderson in The Man Who Stayed at Home in E. Taylor Platt’s touring company, inserted a theatrical card in The Era, 24 February 1915, giving her address the following week as 'Grimsby'.
8 Mar 1915 Grand Theatre, LeedsProfessional
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The Leeds Mercury, 6 February 1915, reported that ‘On the 8th [March] “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” a play of great recruiting value, is to be given’ at the Leeds Grand Theatre. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” is the play of the moment, and at its first appearance in Yorkshire a large audience at the Grand Theatre last night gave a reception as enthusiastic as it has enjoyed in its run the Royalty Theatre, London. And very deservedly so. The authors, Mr. Harold Terry, the novelist, of York, and Mr. Lechmere Worrall, have conceived a very exciting and thrilling spy story, which makes one of the best dramas that the stage has seen for a long time ... Mr. George Tully as Christopher Brent, the hero the story, carries a big responsibility, and he scores a great personal triumph. His insouciance in the assumption of the airs and inanities of the dude is no less convincing than amusing. There is, of course, a love interest in the play, and Miss Mary Merrall charmingly portrays the part of the sorely perplexed lover of Brent, while Miss Esty Marsh perfectly realises the part of Miriam Leigh, the assistant of Brent in the Sherlock Holmes business. The German element is all well sustained, and able artists in every part present a play which is in every phase a pronounced success’ (Yorkshire Evening Post, 9 March 1915; the actors named were members of the Vedrenne and Eadie company). Reviewed in The Stage, 11 March 1915.
8 Mar 1915 Theatre Royal, HalifaxProfessional
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The Stage, 11 March 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 8 March at the R., Halifax. The Man Who Stayed at Home is ‘one of the most fascinating and gripping pieces which has been staged in Halifax for a long time … it lacks nothing in completeness so far as the German spy system is concerned. There is a wireless apparatus concealed in the parlour fireplace, the waiter has plans of minefields in his waistcoat pocket, the son has revolvers ever ready, flash lamps are always at hand, and the German fraulein is full of subtle strategy. The piece is splendidly interpreted by Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s company’. The cast included Charles Esdale, Frances Davie, Goodwin Nock, Grahame Herington, Mary Lincoln, Dorothy Hall, Russell Bendle. Halifax Evening Courier, 9 March 1915.
15 Mar 1915 Theatre Royal, NottinghamProfessional
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The Nottingham Evening Post, 17 March 1915, advertised every evening that week at the Theatre Royal ‘Vedrenne and Eadie Present The Successful Royalty Theatre Spy Play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” Now Playing to Crowded Houses in London. Have you been excited by the German Spy Scare? See how it was tackled by The Man Who Stayed at Home’.
15 Mar 1915 Theatre Royal, BlackburnProfessional
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The Stage, 11 March 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 15 March at the Royal, Blackburn.
22 Mar 1915 Marlborough Theatre, Holloway, LondonProfessional
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‘The play of the moment, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” the successful spy play from the Royalty Theatre, London, will be played at the Marlborough Theatre next week by Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie’s Company. It is a play bright, amusing, and exciting, based on a phase of the new life we are living. It cleverly treats the spy question with humour, and yet with a certain solemnity, without in any way bringing forward the horrors of war, which seem to all out of place at the theatre ... it is thrilling and at the same time amusing. It deals with the burning question of Foreign Spies on the East Coast. It reflects the England of to-day. It appeals to young and old alike, to civilian as much as to soldier. The devices used by the spies are drawn from what has actually occurred. Although it deals with war time, there is no suggestion of the horrors of war. Suburban theatre-goers have seldom had the opportunity of witnessing such an interesting play as “The Man who Stayed at Home”‘ (Shoreditch Observer, 19 March 1915).
22 Mar 1915 Theatre Royal, RochdaleProfessional
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‘Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s company were here [the Royal, Rochdale] with The Man Who Stayed at Home for the first three nights’. The cast was Charles Esdale, Mary Lincoln, Frances Davie, Graham Hetherington [sic], Dorothy Hall, Hilda Gregory, Christine Jenson [sic], Edith Cuthbert, Goodwin Nock, Russell Bendall [sic], Farries Moss, Harold Greaves. Edward Compton and company would perform in the latter part of the week. The Stage, 25 March 1915.
25 Mar 1915 Royal Theatre, BuryProfessional
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The Stage, 25 March 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 25 March at the Royal, Bury.
29 Mar 1915 Royalty, Barrow-in-FurnessProfessional
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The Stage, 25 March 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 29 March at the Royalty, Barrow.
29 Mar 1915 Borough Theatre, StratfordProfessional
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‘At the Borough Theatre, Stratford, next week, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” the successful Royalty Theatre Spy Play, will be presented by Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie’s Company ... The play of the moment, a play of German spies and English spy-catchers, it is full of amusement and not without exciting moments ... The play is delightfully ingenious. Never for moment does it lose its grip, and the excitement is almost continuously intense. The strong cast includes George Tully, Gordon Bailey, George Martin, A. R. Whatmore, Charles Grenville, Geo. Hewetson, Mary Merrall, Esty Marsh, Mary Relph, Florence Harwood, Lola Duncan and Valerie Richards’. East London Observer, 27 March 1915.
5 Apr 1915 Theatre Royal, NewcastleProfessional
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‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” will be presented at the Theatre Royal [next week] by Messrs Vedrenne and Eadie’s company. Bright and amusing, and exciting, it should make an admirable holiday attraction, treating as it does in topical fashion with the spy question, at once with humour and solemnity. In a word it reflects England of to-day. It deals with one of the most momentous questions of the hour - espionage. The cast includes Messrs George Tully, Gordon Bailey, George Martin, A. R. Whatmore, Charles Grenville, George Hewetson, and the Misses Mary Merrall, Esty Marsh, Mary Relph, Florence Harwood, Lola Duncan, and Valerie Richards’. Newcastle Journal, 3 April 1915.
5 Apr 1915 Victoria Opera House, BurnleyProfessional
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‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” is a fitting title for the play which ... is presented at the Victoria Opera House this week by Mr. Taylor Platt, for it depicts in vivid style, and forcibly too, that many of the men who not enlist are “doing their little bit” quite as efficiently as they could do in the ranks. It is essentially a patriotic play – all plays at the present time have to be more or less so to prove anything of a success - but it is by no means made of the poor, weak stuff that consists of gun firing, plenty of alleged sensational situations, and nothing else. “The Man Who Stayed at Home “ gets to the heart of things, and, dealing in a sensible but not overdrawn manner with the German spy system in England, it is particularly attractive, and is, in Burnley this week as at all the places it has visited, pleasing all classes. But the play does something more than stir one’s patriotism. It abounds with amusing passages, and the two sections - dramatic and humorous - of the piece are so blended as to effectively prevent any single moment becoming dull - the result being a really excellent production. One thing that immediately strikes the attention is the entire absence of “fake”: there is not a single feature of the play that is not genuine. In the scene where the stay-at-home man discovers the wireless apparatus of the spies, it is instantly observed that the instrument is fixed in a very business like manner, while later the playing of the searchlights outside the house in which the action of the piece takes place is particularly realistic. It is indeed a highly successful play, and the object with which it was written - to interest and the same time to amuse - has more than been achieved' ... From beginning to end “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is the play of the season. As one patron observed on Monday, it is entirely free from the blood and thunder style, and possibly that factor alone has much to do with its success. It is certainly worth a visit’. Burnley Express, 7 April 1915.
12 Apr 1915 Theatre Royal, YorkProfessional
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The Stage, 15 April 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 12 April at the Royal, York. This must be the Vedrenne and Eadie company as the Taylor Platt company was in Lincoln and Grantham this week.
12 Apr 1915 Theatre Royal, LincolnProfessional
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The Stage, 15 April 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 12 April for three nights at the Royal, Lincoln.
15 Apr 1915 Theatre Royal, GranthamProfessional
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The Grantham Journal, 10 April 1915, advertised ‘London’s Greatest Success, “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ at the Theatre Royal, Grantham, for three nights only, Thursday-Saturday, 15-17 April. The Stage, 15 April 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 15 April for three nights at the Royal, Grantham.
19 Apr 1915 Royal Court Theatre, WiganProfessional
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The Stage, 15 April 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 19 April at the Court, Wigan. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” will be found an ingenious play, at once exciting and humorous. Some might describe it as a play with a purpose, its intention being to open our eyes to the deep seated purpose, and co-ordination and ramification, of the German spy system. The events of the last eight months have taught us that the German spy peril has been a very real thing; and therefore this story of how an almost unimaginable tragedy was averted in a boarding-house on the East Coast may not only be looked upon as a mere dramatic venture, but as something based on probability strengthened by suspicion and even knowledge. Therefore, it is quite a play of the moment, and one can readily understand the vogue it has obtained in all the places visited. With the military section of the community it enjoys remarkable favour for the technical points involved apart from the dramatic evolution of the story, and the light and interesting manner of its treatment. The audience were thoroughly held and swayed on Monday. It was not a large gathering, but the impression created was such that no doubt need to exist as to the ultimate success of the engagement …’ (Wigan Observer and District Advertiser, 20 April 1915).
19 Apr 1915 Royal Court, LiverpoolProfessional
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‘There was a sound of revelry last night at the Court on the occasion of the presentation of “The Man Who Stayed at Home” to a well-filled house, of which khaki was the prevalent colour. The action of the piece has as its central motive the counter-checking of German espionage, and as a foil the acerbities of a seaside boarding-house are wittily exploited. There is hardly a languishing moment. In the name-part, Mr. George Tully electrically charged the auditorium with thrills and merriment, and was altogether at home in his double character of “nut” and detective of keenest instinct. The company gave him excellent support’. Liverpool Echo, 20 April 1915. George Tully was a member of the Vedrenne and Eadie company.
26 Apr 1915 Theatre Royal, WorcesterProfessional
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The Era, 21 April 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt Co.) as On The Road from 26 April at the T.R., Worcester.
26 Apr 1915 King's Theatre, GlasgowProfessional
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‘At the King’s Theatre the “spy drama,” entitled “The Man Who Stayed at Home” was presented last night by Messrs Vedrenne & Eadie. The action of the play takes place in an east coast boarding-house, the proprietrix of which is a spy, and the topical interest, added to the skill in the construction of the drama, makes the production of particular interest. Christopher Brent, “the man who stayed at home,” poses at the boarding-house as an idler, braving the accusation of shirker, and unveils and frustrates the plot of the spies against peaceful non-combatants, reaping the credit of his work at the finish, Mr George Tully acted splendidly as Christopher Brent, and he was supported by a splendidly capable company, including Miss Mary Merrall, Miss Esty March, Miss Lola Duncan, and Mr Gordon Bailey. There was a large audience at last night’s production, and. the play was given an appreciative hearing’. The Scotsman, 27 April 1915. Noted in The Stage, 29 April 1915. The cast was George Tully (Christopher Brent), Charles Grenville (Fritz), George Martin (John Preston), Ethel Miller (Mrs. Sanderson), Esty Marsh (Miriam Leigh), Lola Duncan (Fraulein Schroeder), Valerie Richards (Daphne), Mary Merrall (Molly), Florence Harwood (Miss Myrtle), Gordon Bailey (Carl), A. R. Whatmore (Pennicuik).
3 May 1915 Theatre Royal, StockportProfessional
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The Stage, 6 May 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 3 May at the Royal, Stockport.
3 May 1915 Lyceum Theatre, EdinburghProfessional
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‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” At The Lyceum. This German spy play ... was presented last night at the Lyceum by a capable company, and was followed with the keenest attention by a large audience. The authors ... may be congratulated on having written so excellent a melodrama, dealing with a subject which has occupied the minds of so many people during the past nine months, and the difficulties and dangers of which are even yet by no means at an end. That the play is so thoroughly interesting is due to two main causes. In connection with the German system of espionage, organised in what may be called so scientific a manner in every country of Europe, many extravagant things have, no doubt, been written and said. But in the play, the incidents from all we know now of German spying at home and abroad in no case exceed the bounds of possibility, even of probability: and the game of the spies being themselves successfully spied upon by the emissaries of the British Government, which is the plot of the drama, provides some thrilling situations in the course of the three acts. Then, too, the drama is cleverly put together. It is not all serious. There is abundance of light comedy relief … “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is a play which can be strongly recommended, because for one thing it deals in a rather sane manner with a present-day problem which is not yet solved. It was admirably acted by the whole company …’. The Scotsman, 4 May 1915. This must be the Vedrenne and Eadie company as the Taylor Platt company was in Stockport this week.
10 May 1915 King's Theatre, SunderlandProfessional
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The Stage, 6 and 13 May 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 10 May at the King’s, Sunderland. This must be the Vedrenne and Eadie company as Taylor Platt’s company was in Southport this week.
10 May 1915 Opera House, SouthportProfessional
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The Stage, 6 May 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 10 May at the O.H., Southport.
17 May 1915 Winter Gardens, New BrightonProfessional
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‘The play of the moment is “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” a play which their Majesties went to see only last week. This week the spy is working at the Winter Gardens [New Brighton], and a capable company makes the most of this interesting business. The vein of humour running through the three acts is very acceptable, and last night’s crowded house, by its unstinted applause, voted the work and the workers as most praiseworthy. The principal parts are taken by the following: Messrs. Chas. Esdale, Goodwin Nock, J. Farries Moss, and Russell Bendle, and Misses Edith Cuthbert, Dorothy Hassard [sic - Hall?], and Hilda Gregory’ [all members of the E. Taylor Platt company] (Liverpool Echo, 18 May 1915). Reported in The Stage, 20 May 1915: ‘The play is a bright, entertaining, and at times melodramatically thrilling piece, and is very ably and effectively presented by a well-selected company’. The cast was Charles Esdaile [sic], Goodwin Nock, Hilda Gregory, Dorothy Hall, Christine Jensen, Mary Lincoln, Frances Davie, Russell Bendle, Grahame Herington, J. Farries Moss, Harold Greaves and Edith Cuthbert (The Stage, 20 May 1915).
17 May 1915 Opera House, ScarboroughProfessional
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The Stage, 20 May 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 17 May at the O.H., Scarborough (3 days). This must be the Vedrenne and Eadie company as Taylor Platt’s company was at the Winter Gardens, New Brighton this week.
20 May 1915 Opera House, HarrogateProfessional
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The Stage, 20 May 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 20 May at the O.H., Harrogate (3 days). This must be the Vedrenne and Eadie company as Taylor Platt’s company was at the Winter Gardens, New Brighton this week.
24 May 1915 Theatre Royal, BradfordProfessional
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The Stage, 20 and 27 May 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 24 May at the Royal, Bradford. This must be the Vedrenne and Eadie company as Taylor Platt’s company was at the Opera House, Buxton this week.
24 May 1915 Opera House, BuxtonProfessional
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The Stage, 20 May 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 24 May at the O.H., Buxton.
31 May 1915 Theatre Royal, AldershotProfessional
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The Stage, 27 May and 3 June 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 31 May at the Royal, Aldershot.
7 Jun 1915 Pier Theatre, EastbourneProfessional
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The Man Who Stayed at Home ‘will be performed for the first time in Eastbourne at the Pier Theatre next week, and will no doubt attract much attention. “The Man who Stayed at Home” deals with the present anxious time ... to those of our manhood who have nobly responded to the call of arms, and those who for various reasons have not yet responded to the call, “The Man who Stayed at Home” will prove of vital interest. … Mr. Taylor Platt, who is so closely associated with the Royalty Theatre, London, is responsible for the production …’ (Eastbourne Gazette, 2 June 1915). ‘The play is thrilling and at the same time amusing. It reflects the England of to-day, and is undoubtedly the play of the moment, showing the devices used by the spies. It appeals to old and young alike, the civilian as much as to the soldier; and although it deals with war-time, there is no suggestion of the horrors of the battlefield. On Monday evening the play was received with undoubted favour by an appreciative audience who revelled in the humour the story, and the masterly manner in which “the man who stayed at home” circumvented the enemies of his country’ (Eastbourne Gazette, 9 June 1915).
26 Jul 1915 Theatre Royal, BournemouthProfessional
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‘All roads lead to the great Royalty Theatre spy play this week, and crowded and enthusiastic audiences are appearing at the Theatre Royal each evening to witness “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” and follow every movement of “ The Man Who Had to Stay at Home.” After seeing this clever play one ceases to wonder why it proved such a sensational success in town, and why the subject is on the lips of every patriot in the provinces. Situations bright, amusing, and thrilling follow each other in quick succession, and the excitement is maintained by a series of dramatic surprises which at times raise pitite and stallholder to an unusual pitch of enthusiasm ... The ingenious devices and effects introduced form no small features that assist in keeping the rivetted attention of the audience throughout. There is not a single member of Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie’s company who does not enter into his or her part with every touch of realism'. Bournemouth Graphic, 30 July 1915.
2 Aug 1915 Grand Theatre, SouthamptonProfessional
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The Stage, 5 August 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Vedrenne and Eadie) as On Tour from 2 August at the Grand, Southampton.
2 Aug 1915 Pier Theatre, EastbourneProfessional
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The Eastbourne Gazette, 4 August 1915, advertised that week at the Pier Theatre ‘E. Taylor Platt (by arrangement with Vedrenne and Eadie) presents The Successful Royalty Theatre Spy Play – The Man Who Stayed at Home ... Now playing to crowded houses at the Royalty, London'.
9 Aug 1915 New Cross Broadway, LondonProfessional
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The Stage, 5 August 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Vedrenne and Eadie) as On Tour from 9 August at the Broadway, New Cross.
9 Aug 1915 Dalston Theatre, LondonProfessional
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For the week following the August Bank Holiday the Dalston Theatre announces ‘that wonderful attraction which is breaking all records at the Royalty Theatre, viz: “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ (Shoreditch Observer, 30 July 1915). ‘Through the enterprise of Mr. J. Landon Lee, North London theatre-goers will have the opportunity of witnessing the phenomenally successful Spy play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” at their favourite resort, the Dalston Theatre, next week, with a cast of exceptional brilliancy' (Gloucester Citizen, 4 August 1915).
16 Aug 1915 Kennington Theatre, LondonProfessional
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‘Kennington Theatre has always been a source of joy to playgoers. The building itself is handsome and convenient and first class plays and first class companies to interpret them are the rule. Thus this week finds “The Man who Stayed at Home” hospitably housed and welcomed’ (Norwood News, 20 August 1915). ‘Last week that capital play, The Man Who Stayed at Home, filled the bill [at the Kennington Theatre], played by a strong company, headed by Mr. George Tully' (The Tatler, 25 August 1915). George Tully was a member of he Vedrenne and Eadie company.
16 Aug 1915 Pavilion Theatre, WeymouthProfessional
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‘On Monday evening The Man Who Stayed at Home was presented here [the Pavilion, Weymouth] by Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s company. In the part of Christopher Brent M. Charles Troode is responsible for an altogether delightful piece of work, while the Carl Sanderson of Mr. Goodwin Rock [sic] is another notable performance which receives warm recognition. The John Preston of Mr. Grahame Herington is worthy of praise, and Miss Evelyn Walsh Hall supplies a capital study of Miriam Leigh. Miss Hilda Francks plays Mrs. Sanderson very effectively, and Miss Dorothy Hall must be commended for some powerful work as Fraulein Schroeder. Mention must also be made of Miss Mary Lincoln (Molly Preston), Miss Ethel Russell (Miss Myrtle), Miss Edith Cuthbert (Daphne), Mr. Russell Rendle [sic] (Fritz), and Mr. J. Farries Moss (Percival Pennicuik)’. The Stage, 19 August 1915.
19 Aug 1915 Kursaal Theatre, BognorProfessional
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The Bognor Regis Observer, 11 August 1915, advertised at the Kursaal Theatre in the following week Diana of Dobson’s on Monday-Wednesday and The Man Who Stayed at Home (‘The Play of the Moment’) on Thursday-Saturday.
23 Aug 1915 Theatre Royal, BrightonProfessional
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‘Splendid business is being done at the Royal [Brighton], where Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie’s company are presenting The Man who Stayed at Home. There was a large attendance on Monday, the audience including a considerable number of English and Indian officers. The company have been selected with care, and both the sensational and amusing parts of the piece are well presented. Chief honours are carried off by Mr. George Tully as Christopher Brent and Miss Esty Marsh as Miriam Leigh, and their efforts are well seconded by Mr. Frank Woolfe (Carl Sanderson), Mr. C. Haviland Burke (John Preston), Mr. J. Augustus Keogh (Fritz), Miss Eugenie Vernie (Mrs. Sanderson), Miss Laurie Flockton (Molly Preston), and Gladys Hamilton (Fraulein Schroeder). Other parts are by Mr. Ernest H. G. Cox (Percival Pennicuik), Mr. George Hewetson (Corporal Atkins), Miss Christine Jensen (Miss Myrtle), and Miss Valerie Richards (Daphne Kidlington)’. The Stage, 26 August 1915.
23 Aug 1915 Grand Theatre, CroydonProfessional
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The Grand Theatre, Croydon, advertised in The Stage, 26 August 1915, that it ‘re-opened on Monday last.. with The Man Who Stayed at Home. Booking, over £100 before doors opened’. An advertisement for the theatre in The Stage, 2 September 1915, mentioned that gross receipts for The Man Who Stayed at Home had been £611.
30 Aug 1915 Theatre Royal, HanleyProfessional
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‘Next week at the Theatre Royal, Hanley, Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie’s Company will present “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” the successful spy play that is still running at the Royalty Theatre, London. It is ... in three acts, each act being amusing and at the same time thrilling … The strong cast includes: George Tully, Frank Woolfe, Haviland Burke, J. Augustus Keogh, George Hewetson, Ernest Cox, Esty Marsh, Eugenie Vernie, Laurie Flockton, Christina Jensen, Gladys Hamilton, Valerie Richards’ (Staffordshire Sentinel, Wednesday 25 August 1915). Previewed in the Staffordshire Sentinel, 28 August 1915: ‘It is a play which deals with events of the moment, and has several episodes of great dramatic power, and is full of humour’.
30 Aug 1915 Palace, WestcliffeProfessional
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The Stage, 26 August 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 30 August at the Palace, Westcliff.
6 Sep 1915 Grand Opera House, MiddlesboroughProfessional
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‘A drama of absorbing interest, and one that play-goers of Middlesbrough will be ill-advised to miss, comes to the Opera House next week. It is “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” and deals with the trials of a young man who, although he cannot give reasons to his sweetheart for failing to enlist, doing his country the greatest service in working to break up a German spy organisation. There is a strong caste for Mr E. Taylor Platt’s production’ (Daily Gazette for Middlesbrough, 4 September 1915). Noted in The Stage, 9 September 1915, which listed the cast.
6 Sep 1915 Theatre Royal, ManchesterProfessional
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‘“The Man who Stayed at Home,” a spy play which was given with much success at the Prince’s Theatre in February last, will be given at the Royal next week by Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie’s Company. There is much that is appropriate at the present time in “The Man who Stayed at Home,” though it must not be supposed that he was necessarily wanting in courage to face his country’s enemies. The value of his reason must be left with the audience to judge. The play offers a proof that useful work can be done by the physically unfit as well as those able to join the ranks. In the play the spy peril is brought home by actual illustration ... It will be presented by a strong company, including George Tully, Frank Woolfe, Haviland Burke, J. Augustus Keogh, George Hewetson, Esty Marsh, Eugenic Vernie, Laurie Flockton, Christine Jensen, Gladys Hamilton, Valerie Richards’ (Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 4 September 1915). ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home,” which is paying its return visit to Manchester this week, attracted a large audience to the Theatre Royal last night. It is a play which is appropriate for the times, and exposes to the full the dangers of the German spy system in England, and how ingenious are the methods adopted to conceal a wireless apparatus. It also shows in a marked degree that useful service can be rendered to the country by those men who are physically unfit to join the forces, although it must be admitted that few such opportunities are presented [to] “the man who stays at home” in these days. The company is of all-round excellence, and interest is maintained from the rise to the fall of the curtain' (Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 7 September 1915).
13 Sep 1915 New Theatre Royal, BirkenheadProfessional
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‘Once nightly is the rule at the New Theatre Royal this week, when Mr. E. T. Platt presents “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” The play is well known, and has had a long run in London. Mr. Charles Froode [sic – Troode], whose clever portrayal of the difficult role of Christopher Brint [sic – Brent] was greatly appreciated, was ably assisted by Miss Evelyn Walsh Hall as Miriam Lee [sic – Leigh], Miss Mary Lincoln as Molly Preston, Messrs. Goodwin Nock as Carl Sadderson [sic – Sanderson], Graham Harrington [ sic - Herington], Russell Bendle, and Misses Ethel Russell, Dorothy Hall (as Fraulein Schroeder) and Edith Cuthbert’ (Liverpool Echo, 14 September 1915). Also noted in The Stage, 16 September 1915.
13 Sep 1915 Royal Lyceum Theatre, EdinburghProfessional
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‘All the men who stay at home are not “slackers.” That’s the moral pointed by the play which is coming to the Lyceum Theatre. “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” in its exciting adventures in the hunting down of German spies on the East Coast, gives a hint to the white feather brigade to know something of the facts before they label a man. The monocled young idiot in the play is not so empty as looks. He is, in fact, a clever secret agent who, under the ruse of his silly cackle, effects the capture of a dangerous band of spies. The play has plenty of spirited action, and is, of course, intensely topical. Mr George Tully will play the man who stayed at home, and will be supported by a very capable company’ (Edinburgh Evening News, 11 September 1915; George Tully was a member of the Vedrenne and Eadie company). ‘On Saturday, 18th September, in addition to their usual weekly entertainment to 200 wounded soldiers at the Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh, Mr and Mrs Forbes of Callendar entertained over 400 non-commissioned officers and mem of the 3rd Battalion A. & S.H. and other friends, in view of the date being the 17th anniversary of their eldest daughter’s birthday. The whole company, numbering about 700, was afterwards entertained at tea in the Artillery Halls, opposite the Lyceum Theatre … The 3-tier birthday cake was cut by Miss Forbes ably assisted by Lord Provost Inches, General Bethune, and Mr Tully (“The man who stayed at home”)’. Stirling Observer, 28 September 1915.
20 Sep 1915 King's Theatre, GlasgowProfessional
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‘A large audience at the King’s Theatre gave a hearty welcome to the dramatic play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” last night, when it revisited the city. The topical character of the piece and its intrinsic merits make a strong appeal to playgoers, the telling of the story of the intrigues connected with the secret service of Germany being accomplished most effectively. Messrs Vedrenne and Eadie’s company, which includes such fine players as Mr George Tully, Mr Frank Woolfe, Mis Esty Marsh, and Miss Gladys Hamilton, perform the play with appropriate spirit, holding the interest of the audience in the thrilling incidents throughout. From many aspects “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is one of the most successful dramas now before the public’ (The Scotsman, 21 September 1915). ‘A large audience welcomed back to the King’s Theatre last night the stirring war drama, “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” Linked intimately as it is with the war, and bound together with a romance of love interest, the play is very suitable theatrical fare at the moment. It serves to remind nervous people that the Secret Service of this country is as active and intelligent as that of Germany, though less advertised. The drama moves in a realistic manner, throwing out a quiet thrill here and there on its way' (Daily Record, 21 September 1915).
20 Sep 1915 ?, LlandudnoProfessional
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The Stage, 23 September 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 20 September at Llandudno (3 days) and Aberystwyth (3 days).
23 Sep 1915 ?, AberystwythProfessional
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The Stage, 23 September 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 20 September at Llandudno (3 days) and Aberystwyth (3 days).
27 Sep 1915 His Majesty's Theatre, AberdeenProfessional
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‘If all of us had the same excellent reasons for staying at home as had Mr Christopher Brent, in the spy-play presented at His Majesty’s Theatre last night, a troubled Cabinet would been relieved of much embarrassment. “The Man who Stayed Home” comes from the Royalty, London, and its fine record there, and in the provinces more recently, was splendidly sustained last night, when a bumper holiday audience gave it rapt attention and enthusiastic appreciation. Thrilling and amusing from start to end, the play owes its popularity, no less to its cleverly conceived characters and humorous dialogue, than to the ingeniously topical theme around which they are strung'. The cast included George Tully, C. Haviland-Burke, J. Augustus Keogh, Ernest Cox, Laurie Flockton, Eugenie Vernie, Gladys Hamilton, Valerie Richards, Esty Marsh (Aberdeen Press and Journal, 28 September 1915; the actors were members of the Vedrenne and Eadie company). ‘In these enervating times the presentation of a play which, far from distracting us from our daily anxieties, actually familiarises us with war’s alarums and excursions would seem to be a somewhat foolhardy experiment. In reality, however, if the play be such a one as “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” which was staged at His Majesty’s Theatre last night, a very cordial and even enthusiastic reception cannot be gainsaid. What may be termed the academic side of war - relating to spies, who are a sort of half-brothers to diplomatists - is perfectly innocuous, and certainly last night’s audience enjoyed the three-act spy-play with the utmost heartiness. The action is quite engrossing with a delightfully romantic infusion, and the clever little parodies of melodrama are peculiarly entertaining ... In short, the production is war-proof’ (Aberdeen Evening Express, 28 September 1915).
27 Sep 1915 Winter Gardens, BlackpoolProfessional
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The Stage, 23 and 30 September 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 27 September at the Winter Gardens, Blackpool.
4 Oct 1915 Her Majesty's Theatre, DundeeProfessional
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‘If every man who stayed at home” had as sufficient a reason for it as had Christopher Brent, the hero of the play produced for the first time in Dundee at Her Majesty’s last night, there would be no need even to talk of conscription, for Brent remained here because he could give his country best service in England. The play was enthusiastically received by a huge audience ... There is always intense interest in the doings of a clever spy, and this is still keener when rival spies are at work, and the patriotic spirit counts for much. The war element, of course, pervades the whole play, but there are no horrors, not even any bloodshed, and the only audible shooting is the boom of the big guns from the two British cruisers which at the end demolish the German submarine U11’. The cast included George Tully, C. Haviland-Burke, Frank Woolfe, J. Augustus Keogh, Ernest H. G. Cox, Laurie Flockton, Esty Marsh, Gladys Hamilton, Christine Jensen, Eugenie Vernie, Valerie Richards. Dundee Courier, 5 October 1915.
4 Oct 1915 Opera House, CoventryProfessional
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‘To those who are continually itching to give a white feather to every able-bodied man they meet who has not been to the war a visit to the Opera House this week will show that it is possible that all the eligible who still remain at home are not slackers. The visit will likewise show how extensive are the ramifications of the German spy system, and how, under the guise of the most sincere friendship, the enemy might still exist in our midst, doing us incalculable harm. Both these points are strongly marked in the play, “The man who stayed at home,” which has had a very successful run at the Hales Street house this week’ (Coventry Standard, 8 October 1915). The cast was listed in the Coventry Standard, 1 October 1915.
11 Oct 1915 Grand, WolverhamptonProfessional
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The Stage, 7 October 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 11 October at the Grand, Wolverhampton.
11 Oct 1915 Tyne Theatre, NewcastleProfessional
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‘“The Man who Stayed at, Home” ... did so to very good purpose indeed ... Those who have not seen the play should not miss the present opportunity, for it is certainly one of the most interesting productions on tour. It demonstrates the spy peril and is full of exciting incidents and is not by any means lacking in fun’. The cast is George Tully, Laurie Flockton, Frank Woolfe, C. Haviland-Burke, J. Augustus Keogh, Ernest H. G. Cox, George Hewetson, Eugenie Vernie, Christine Jensen, Gladys Hamilton, Valerie Richards [members of the Vedrenne and Eadie company]. Newcastle Daily Chronicle, 12 October 1915.
18 Oct 1915 Opera House, TorquayProfessional
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The Stage, 21 October 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 18 October at the O.H., Torquay.
18 Oct 1915 Theatre Royal, BradfordProfessional
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The Stage, 21 October 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Vedrenne and Eadie) as On Tour from 18 October at the Royal, Bradford.
25 Oct 1915 Theatre Royal, BathProfessional
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The Stage, 21 October 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 25 October at the Royal, Bath.
25 Oct 1915 Grand Theatre, LeedsProfessional
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‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” makes a return visit this week to the Leeds Grand Theatre, where its reception last night revealed its undiminished popularity. Full of incident, this spy-play provides thrilling moments in plenty, dashed with a humour that largely emanates from the super-nut, whose vapid nuttishness so effectively conceals his true capabilities as an observer’. The cast included George Tully, Frank Woolfe, Augustus Keogh, Eugenie Vernie, Gladys Hamilton [members of the Vedrenne and Eadie company] (Leeds Mercury, 26 October 1915).
1 Nov 1915 New Theatre, SalisburyProfessional
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The Stage, 28 October 1915, listed E. Taylor Platt’s The Man Who Stayed at Home in Calls or Monday 1 November at ‘Salisbury New’, with Mark Humbourg (the concert pianist?) listed there for 5 November. The Stage, 4 November 1915, noted that E. Taylor Platt’s company was presenting The Man Who Stayed at Home at the New, Salisbury.
1 Nov 1915 Prince of Wales Theatre, BirminghamProfessional
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‘The return visit to Birmingham of that successful spy play, “The Man Who Stayed Home,” attracted a large and appreciative audience to the Prince of Wales Theatre last night, and the excellence of the acting, coupled with the topical interest attaching to the story, makes it a thoroughly enjoyable show. It is a very cohesive and absorbing story of the William Le Queux type which the authors have written, with the ramification of the German espionage and the British Secret Service the central features. The introduction of events of the war which occupy the minds of the public very largely at the moment, add a spice to the dialogue, which is replete with really fine humour’. The cast included George Tully, Esty Marsh, Laurie Flockton, C. Haviland-Burke, Eugenie Vernie, Gladys Hamilton, Charles Grenville (Evening Despatch, 2 November 1915). ‘The successful spy play, as “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is called, has been seen before in Birmingham, and the first thing that occurs to one in writing about it is that though less than twelve months old it already seems a little out of date. When produced at the Royalty Theatre last December the German spy mania was general, and the prevalent fears and suspicions were far from baseless. To-day, with alien internment camps pretty well filled the public mind is not haunted, at least to anything like the same extent, with such apprehensions. To discuss whether this dramatic tract for the times served its purpose is unnecessary. To-day “The Man Who Stayed at Home” has to be judged simply from the acting and box office points of view. It is melodrama pure and simple, a thrill provided on a most generous scale, and consequently a play that will book well, certainly as long as the war lasts … interest and excitement are never allowed to flag, and … for those who like this kind of domestic entertainment their requirements are thoroughly met’ (Birmingham Daily Post, 2 November 1915). ‘Some years ago the management of a Drury Lane theatre tried to displace its usual autumn drama by a new kind play, which it entitled “melo-farce.” Unfortunately the experiment was a failure. But if the authors had lived to see “The Man Who Stayed At Home” they would have seen the triumph of their idea. This play is a most entertaining blend of melodrama and comedy, and we can think of no better description for it than “melo-farce.’’ It is left to the playgoer’s individual frame of mind to decide whether the farcical or the melodramatic element eventually comes out on top; but nobody can have any doubt about the cleverness of the way in which the two sections of the play are mingled and interwoven. And there is further the author’s cleverness in making their jolly hotch-potch so pointedly topical, so bang up-to-date. The melodrama of the play is all about German spies, submarines, and plans of fortifications; its comedy is about enlisting the phantom “Russians” and the New Armies. One might have thought that a year and a half after its first production the play’s topical application would have faded; but its continued success in London proves that it has not, as the warm welcome given the piece at the Prince Wales Theatre last night also proved. “The Man Who Stayed At Home” is, in fact, the most successful, as it is the most entertaining, of all our war plays. There have been others which have aimed at a more ambitious mark; but there has been none which has so happily reached its aim’ (Birmingham Mail, 2 November 1915).
8 Nov 1915 Opera House, LeicesterProfessional
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The Leicester Daily Post, 1 November 1915, advertised ‘Vedrenne and Eadie’s company, in the Royalty Theatre Spy Play The Man Who Stayed at Home’, with George Tully, at the Royal Opera House from Monday 8 November. Reviewed in the Leicester Daily Post, 9 November 1915 (largely illegible in the copy on the British Newspaper Archive).
8 Nov 1915 Lyceum Theatre, NewportProfessional
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The Era, 10 November 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On The Road from 8 November at the Ly., Newport. Reported in The Stage, 11 November 1915.
15 Nov 1915 Theatre Royal, HuddersfieldProfessional
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The Era, 10 November 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Vedrenne and Eadie) as On The Road from 15 November at the T.R., Huddersfield. Also The Stage, 11 November 1915.
15 Nov 1915 Grand, SwanseaProfessional
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The Era, 10 November 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On The Road from 15 November at the Grand, Swansea. Also The Stage, 11 November 1915.
22 Nov 1915 Theatre Royal, PortsmouthProfessional
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The Era, 17 November 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On The Road from 22 November at the T.R., Portsmouth (also The Stage, 18 November 1915). ‘“Peg o’ My Heart” is the piece to be staged at the Theatre Royal [Portsmouth] next week, in succession to “The Man Who Stayed At Home,” which has proved so popular this week’. Hampshire Telegraph, 26 November 1915.
22 Nov 1915 Royal Court, LiverpoolProfessional
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‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home’’ is very welcome again. Even those who are most sceptical about the least wonderful spy stories which friends “in the know” tell in restaurant asides will have to admit a quickening of the pulse and a gasping interest in the tale of the pseudo “Johnny” who proves a military Sherlock Holmes - only more so. It is so good a tonic that one doesn’t stop to say, “ But—” and criticise. Mr. George Tully this time plays the entertaining Brent with infectious humour and telling unconcern; Mr. C. Haviland Burke has a well-fitting part as the blunt J P.; and Messrs. J. Augustus Keogh (whom we seem to remember pleasantly in very different parts), and Charles Grenville shared honours as German spies. Among the ladies there was the freshness of Miss Laurie Flockton as Molly, and the more sophisticated Mrs. Leigh of Miss Mignon O’Doherty - if one must single out any players, who all did well’. Liverpool Echo, 23 November 1915.
29 Nov 1915 Opera House, NorthamptonProfessional
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The Stage, 2 December 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 29 November at the O.H., Northampton.
29 Nov 1915 Lyceum Theatre, SheffieldProfessional
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‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home,” the spy play, in which Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie’s company is paying a return visit to the Lyceum Theatre this week, was last night again followed by a large audience with an interest that never wearied. The reasons for the success of this absorbing production are not far to seek. Running through the atmosphere of intrigue and the contest of cunning for world-stakes there is an intermittent flow of high comedy which gave an air of actuality to the whole. In this way the play furnished all the thrills that were anticipated without the sense of the theatre obtruding itself unduly’. The cast included George Tully, J. Augustus Keogh, Charles Grenville, Laurie Flockton, C. Haviland-Burke, Gladys Hamilton, Valerie Richards, Christine Jensen, Mignon O’Doherty (Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 30 November 1915). ‘It is not at all surprising that really well-written play which makes the operations of the German spy in this country its theme should prove the tremendous success which has attended “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” now making a return visit to the Lyceum. All the obvious traces of pronounced melodrama are avoided ... Incidentally there is a wholesome moral drawn against the tendency of the times to sit in judgment on those who for reasons which must remain personal cannot enlist’ (Sheffield Evening Telegraph, 30 November 1915).
6 Dec 1915 Prince's Theatre, BristolProfessional
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‘An up-to-date play is “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” which is this week being presented by Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie’s company at the Prince’s Theatre. In a word the play … illustrates the German spy peril. But it does more. It also reveals how easy it is without knowing the true facts to form wrong conclusions. The play thus teaches a double lesson, first that it is necessary to guard against being too confiding, and secondly that it is equally necessary to guard against a false judgment. Many worthy people have been guilty of both errors. They have trusted Germans where they should have mistrusted, and they have mistrusted their own countrymen where they should have trusted … [it is] not wholly a sombre play for there are in it many amusing scenes and incidents … [it] must by no means be classed as a play in which all the customary exaggerations of melodrama are given their full fling’. The cast was George Tully, C. Haviland Burke, George Bailey, Eugenie Vernie, Gladys Hamilton, J, Augustus Keogh, Mignon O’Doherty, Laurie Flockton, Christine Jensen, Valerie Richards, George Hewetson (Clifton Society, 9 December 1915). ‘The Vedrenne and Eadie Company are presenting The Man who Stayed at Home. On Monday the performance was under the patronage of the British Jewish Literary Society, who, by arrangement with the management, had secured the use of the theatre in aid of the funds for the relief of the local Jewish poor’ (The Stage, 9 December 1915; also mentioned in the Clifton Society, 9 December 1915).
6 Dec 1915 Royal Artillery Theatre, WoolwichProfessional
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The Stage, 2 and 9 December 1915, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 6 December at the Artillery, Woolwich. Also The Era, 8 December 1915.
13 Jan 1916 Opera House, BuxtonProfessional
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The Stage, 13 January 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 13 January (a Thursday) at the O.H., Buxton.
17 Jan 1916 Opera House, BlackpoolProfessional
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‘E. Taylor Platt’s company, with the successful spy play, The Man who Stayed at Home, are attracting audiences here [the Opera House, Blackpool] this week. The strong cast includes Charles Troode, Grahame Herington, Charles H. Mortimer, F. Farries Moss, Russell Bendle, Bert Rouen, Amy Elstob, Dorothy Hall, Mary Lincoln, Hilda Francks, Christine Jensen, and Edith Culbert [sic – Cuthbert]’. The Stage, 20 January 1916.
24 Jan 1916 Winter Gardens, New BrightonProfessional
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The Stage, 20 January 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 24 January at the Winter Gardens, New Brighton. ‘New Brighton Winter Gardens. “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is at the Gardens this week. Capitally written, with a vein of humour running through the whole story, the play is well mounted, and last night’s performance drew a large and enthusiastic audience. Mr. Charles Troode in his dual role got many laughs, and showed resource and capacity. Miss Hall, Mr. Mortimer, Mr. Herington, Miss Lincoln, and Miss Elstob were the chief of the other performers’ (Liverpool Echo, 25 January 1916).
31 Jan 1916 Opera House, SouthportProfessional
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‘The Man Who Stayed at Home is here [the Opera House, Southport]. Charles Froode [sic – Troode] is a capital Christopher Brent, and Graham Herington, as John Preston, J.P., is amusing. Charles H. Mortimer and Russell Bendle give dramatic strength to Carl Sanderson and Fritz, and Percival Pennicuik is aptly realised by J. Farries Moss. Amy Elstob does well as Miriam Leigh, and Dorothy Hall gives an excellent study of Fraulein Schroeder’. The Stage, 3 February 1916.
7 Feb 1916 Gaiety Theatre, DublinProfessional
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‘It must be said that “The Man Who Stayed at Home” justified all the nice things claimed for it before its production at the Gaiety last Monday … Charles Troode [a member of E. Taylor Platt's touring company], as the apparent slacker, has much to do with the making of the play, which is full of the spy scare, and that certain people have not been exaggerating this form of menace to our personal safety is amply demonstrated by the amazing network of intrigue, the possibilities of which are made so clear in this clever work. The author is evidently a keen student of human nature, and he gives us some exceptionally clever studies in this very human play, which might be termed mellow melodrama’ (Sport (Dublin), 12 February 1916).
14 Feb 1916 Grand Opera House, BelfastProfessional
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‘In times of peace the play which is being performed the Grand Opera House this week might be divested of some of its glamour, but there can be doubt about the compelling interest which it has at the present juncture. It is good, vital, stimulating drama, and apart altogether from its topical flavour, it well worthy of the patronage of playgoers. The construction is by no means faultless, but on the whole the authors have handled their material with wonderful skill, and the action is worked with such ingenuity that not until the great climax at the close does one get to know how the tangled threads are to be straightened out … “The Man Who Stayed Home” is essentially a play for the times in which are living, and having regard to this fact it is not surprising that it has proved a huge success' (Belfast News-Letter, 15 February 1916). The cast was listed in the Belfast News-Letter, 10 February 1916, which confirmed the actors as members of E. Taylor Platt's company.
21 Feb 1916 Theatre Royal, YorkProfessional
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The Era, 23 February 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On The Road from 21 February at the T.R., York.
28 Feb 1916 Royalty Theatre, ChesterProfessional
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At the Royalty Theatre next week Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s Company will present “The Man who stayed at Home,” by Lechmere Worrall and J. E. Harold Terry. The two great characters in the play are “The man who stayed at home” and the head of the German spies, who is in the transport department of the Admiralty. The Englishman has the very best of reasons for staying at home, having scented a dark intrigue in the interests of the “Fatherland,” in which half the household are involved. It is now in its second year at the Royalty Theatre, London, and still drawing crowded houses’. Chester Chronicle, 26 February 1916.
6 Mar 1916 New Theatre, CardiffProfessional
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Previewed in the Western Mail, 4 March 1916: ‘the play is at once thrilling and amusing, and has a special appeal for theatre-goers at this period in international affairs’. ‘One of the outstanding features in connection with the great war is the extent of the German spying system. It is not surprising, therefore, that a play based on this subject should be popular. "The Man Who Stayed at Home” is such a play … it drew a packed audience to the Cardiff New Theatre on Monday night. A work of great merit, it deserves all the success it has achieved … There is a strong cast, among whom Messrs. Charles Troode, C. H. Mortimer, G. Herrington, Miss Amy Elstob, Miss Dorothy Hall, and Miss Edith Cuthbert are particularly good’ (Western Mail, 7 March 1916; the actors were members of E. Taylor Platt;s touring company).
13 Mar 1916 Theatre Royal, ExeterProfessional
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‘An enthusiastic audience, which included many khaki-clad men, witnessed, last night the initial performance of "The Man Who Stayed Home," which the Taylor Platt Company, by arrangement with Vedrenne and Eadie, are producing at the Theatre Royal, Exeter, each night this week, with the usual matinee on Friday. This successful Royalty Theatre spy play has created unbounded enthusiasm in London and wherever it has been played, and Exonians last evening accorded it a hearty welcome. Although the play has an undoubted moral, especially for members of the white-feather brigade, it is brimful of mirth and merriment from start to finish, while, at the same time, there are incidents as full of dramatic intensity as the most ardent lover of melodrama can desire … We confidently anticipate full houses at every performance this week, for the play is bound to please all lovers of clean and convincing acting’ (Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, Tuesday 14 March 1916). The cast was listed in the Western Morning News, 11 March 1916.
20 Mar 1916 Grand, SouthamptonProfessional
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The Stage, 16 March 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 20 March at the Grand, Southampton. Previewed in the Hampshire Advertiser, 18 March 1916, which listed the actors.
20 Mar 1916 Apollo, LondonProfessional
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‘When The Man Who Stayed at Home is transferred to the Apollo on Monday the cast will be as follows’: Christopher Brent, Mr. Stanley Logan; Carl Sanderson, Mr. Frank Woolfe; John Preston, J. P., Mr. Sydney Paxton; Percival Pennicuik, Mr. P. Perceval Clark; Fritz, Mr. V. Tarver Penna; Corporal Atkins, Mr. Robert Lawlor; Mrs. Sanderson, Mrs. Robert Brough; Miriam Leigh, Miss Ruth Mackay; Molly Preston, Miss Stella Jesse; Miss Myrtle, Miss Edith Evans; Fräulein Schroeder, Miss Esmé Hubbard; Daphne Kidlington, Miss Norah Balfour. ‘Performances will be given every evening and at matinées on Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. The season, which is by arrangement with Mr. Tom B. Davis, will be for four weeks only’ (The Stage, 16 March 1916; the cast is also listed in the Pall Mall Gazette, 18 March 1916). 'Those of our readers who have not seen The Man Who Stayed At Home should make a point of going to the "Apollo" before the play is taken off’ (War Office Times and Naval Review, 31 March 1916). ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” … was recently taken off after a run of 587 performances’ (Pall Mall Gazette, 22 April 1916).
27 Mar 1916 Theatre Royal, BournemouthProfessional
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The Bournemouth Graphic, 17 March 1916, advertised ‘The Enormously Successful Spy-play The Man Who Stayed at Home’ at the Theatre Royal for the week beginning Monday 27 March. Previewed in the Bournemouth Graphic, 24 March 1916, which listed the actors [members of E. Taylor Platt's touring company] in this 'capital play with its breezy humours, its briskness and its thrills'. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” is a captivating play full of laughter and thrills’ (Bournemouth Graphic, 31 March 1916).
3 Apr 1916 Theatre Royal, BrightonProfessional
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The Era, 5 April 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On The Road from 3 April at the T.R., Brighton. Noted in The Stage, 6 April 1916.
10 Apr 1916 Pleasure Gardens Theatre, FolkestoneProfessional
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‘There have been big houses at the Pleasure Gardens Theatre this week to see “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” presented by the Taylor Platt Company. [The play] had been heralded in superlative terms and expectation had run high. Sometimes the realisation falls short of anticipation. Not so, however, in this case. It is indeed the contrary, so strong and absorbingly interesting is the play … that the theme is topical one is a contributing factor towards the huge success achieved. But that mere fact by itself would not be sufficient to ensure success. It is a finely constructed drama, dealing with a serious subject, yet abounding with excellent humour, which prevents it from being heavy and oppressive. It is pre-eminently the play of the moment’ (Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, 15 April 1916). ‘There can be very few who object to entertainments because it is war-time, but in case there are one or two unreasoning people who think that theatres and picture palaces should be shut up at such a period, I will mention an incident showing that they serve a good purpose. An officer and his wife - the former on leave from the front - staying at Folkestone last week went to the Pleasure Gardens Theatre to see “The Man who Stayed at Home,” not once, but twice. Probably similar instances could be enumerated. We should, course, take the War seriously - and that without grumbling at every little inconvenience that we experience - but it is unwise to be for ever harping on the same subject, and cultivating a morbidity of mind which is bad not only for oneself, but for those with whom we are brought into contact. There is no reason why we should not indulge in amusement to a rational extent, and entertainments are essential for soldiers who are on leave as well those who are in training to befit themselves to take their turn in the firing line’ (Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, 22 April 1916). The actors were listed in the Dover Express, 7 April 1916, and the Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, 8 April 1916.
17 Apr 1916 Gaiety Theatre, HastingsProfessional
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Previewed in the Hastings and St Leonards Observer, 15 April 1916, which listed the actors. ‘There was nearly a full house at the Gaiety Theatre on Monday, when the Taylor Platt company opened a week’s engagement with the great patriotic play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home” … At the conclusion of the play there was an extraordinary display of enthusiasm, the audience rising and cheering the Company, and giving the principals repeated calls before the curtain. There was good reason for this outburst; the play being intensely interesting and the acting excellent’ (Hastings and St Leonards Observer, 22 April 1916).
24 Apr 1916 Pier Theatre, EastbourneProfessional
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‘The Taylor Platt company, still under the acting-management of Alex. Clifton, are paying a third visit with The Man Who Stayed at Home, last seen here in August, Charles Troode (Christopher Brent), Hilda Francks (Mrs. Sanderson), Russell Bendle (Fritz), Dorothy Hall (Fraulein Schroeder), Christine Jensen (Miss Myrtle), Mary Lincoln (Molly Preston), Grahame Herington (John Preston), J. Farries Moss (Percival Pennicuik), and Edith Cuthbert (Daphne Kidlington) repeating their former successes, and the cast being admirably completed by Charles H. Mortimer (Carl Sanderson), Amy Elstob (Miriam Leigh), and Herbert Rouen (Corporal)'. The Stage, 27 April 1916.
1 May 1916 Kennington Theatre, Kennington, LondonProfessional
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‘The successful spy play, “The Man Who Stayed At Home,” presented by Mr Taylor Platt’s company, drew a crowded audience to the Kennington Theatre on Monday night. Mr. Charles Troode was very fine in the character of Christopher Brent, the man who had to stay at home to frustrate the designs of the Germans. Mr. Charles H. Mortimer as Carl Sanderson, the Teutonic spy, was also very successful, and gave a well thought-out interpretation of the character. Mr. Grahame Herington gave a droll rendering of the pompous and peppery John Preston, J.P. Miss Hilda Francks as Mrs. Sanderson was lifelike. The Fräulein Schroeder of Miss Dorothy Hall was a good piece of character acting; as was the Miss Myrtle of Miss Christine Jensen. Miss Mary Lincoln in the part of Molly Preston was engagingly ingenuous and innocent. Mr. J. Farries Moss as Percival Pennicuik and Mr. Russell Bendle as Fritz were both well suited; as was Miss Amy Elstob in the part of Miriam Leigh’. The Era, 3 May 1916.
8 May 1916 Theatre Royal, ChathamProfessional
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The Stage, 4 May 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 8 May at the Royal, Chatham. Advertised in the East Kent Gazette, 6 May 1916.
15 May 1916 Theatre Royal, PortsmouthProfessional
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Advertised in the Hampshire Telegraph, 12 May 1916. The Era, 17 May 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On The Road from 15 May at the T.R., Portsmouth.
22 May 1916 Shakespeare Theatre, LiverpoolProfessional
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The Era, 17 May 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On The Road from 22 May at the Shakespeare, Liverpool. ‘This week Mr. Kelly is offering “The Man Who Stayed at Home” at the Shakespeare’ (The Era, 24 May 1916). Reviewed (‘That stirring study in plot and counterplot’) in the Liverpool Daily Post, 24 May 1916.
29 May 1916 Theatre Royal, BirminghamProfessional
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‘A cleverly told and thrilling story dealing with the cute German espionage system, and yet abounding with sparkling humour, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” again at the Theatre Royal this week, is admirably acted by Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s company. It is a most fascinating story, with many strong dramatic situations, and every incident was well brought out yesterday evening, the audiences time and again showing great appreciation of the clever work of the players' (Evening Despatch, 30 May 1916). ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home,” presented [at the Theatre Royal, Birmingham] for the first time as a twice-nightly show, deals with exciting realities, and so deals with them as to entertain, while it stirs the patriotic emotions. The play is admirably interpreted by the Taylor Platt organisation' (The Era, 31 May 1916). ‘The Man Who Stayed at Home is one of very few War plays which have survived more than one visit , and the reason is not far to seek . It possesses much more domestic interest than the average, and the interesting story is promoted to its full advantage by the carefully company who bring it round to us periodically. The present occasion is no exception, and playgoers in large numbers again this week enjoy the piece thoroughly' (The Stage, 1 June 1916).
5 Jun 1916 Theatre Royal, NottinghamProfessional
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The Era, 31 May 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On The Road from 29 May at the T.R., Nottingham. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home,” which is on a return visit to the Theatre Royal, is entertainment of a thoroughly popular type. The fact that it ran over eighteen months in London affords proof of that. It tells the story of clever work by a British Secret Service agent, who defeats the aims of a gang of German spies in an East Coast boarding-house. There are thrills and laughter in “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” both following quickly upon each other, and the excitement never wanes' (Nottingham Evening Post, 6 June 1916).
12 Jun 1916 Opera House, ScarboroughProfessional
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The Stage, 8 June 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt) as On Tour from 12 June at the O.H., Scarborough. The Era, 14 June 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On The Road from 12 June at the O.H., Scarborough (3 days) and at Harrogate (3 Days).
15 Jun 1916 Unknown Theatre, HarrogateProfessional
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The Era, 14 June 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On The Road from 12 June at the O.H., Scarborough (3 days) and at Harrogate (3 Days). Similarly The Stage, 15 June 1916
5 Jul 1916 Marlborough Theatre, Holloway, LondonProfessional
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‘Mr. Dennis Eadie will visit Holloway this afternoon to play his old part of Christopher Brent in “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” at the Marlborough. Miss Mary Jerrold will again be seen as Fraulein Schroeder, and Miss Robert Brough as Mrs. Sanderson, Miss Stella Jesse will be Molly Preston, and Mr. Frank Wolff Carl. The performance is given on behalf of the Highgate War Hospital Supply Depot’. The Era, 5 July 1916.
24 Jul 1916 Royalty Theatre, LondonProfessional
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‘On Monday next Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie will revive Mr. Lechmere Worrall and Mr. J. E. Harold Terry’s successful comedy, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” at the Royalty Theatre, with the following cast: Christopher Brent, Mr. Malcolm Cherry; Carl Sanderson, Mr. Frank Woolfe; John Preston, J.P., Mr. Hubert Harben; Percival Pennicuik, Mr. Ernest Graham; Fritz, Mr. Robert Lawlor; Corporal Atkins, Mr. Richard Andean; Mrs. Sanderson, Mrs. Robert Brough; Miriam Leigh, Miss Mignon O’Doherty; Molly Preston, Miss Stella Jesse; Miss Myrtle, Miss Edith Evans; Fraulein Schroeder, Miss Mary Jerrold; Daphne Kidlington, Miss Jean Stirling. Performances will be given at 8.15 every evening, and matinées on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday at 3.20pm’ ( Westminster Gazette, 22 July 1916). ‘Times have changed since we first made the acquaintance of “The Man Who Stayed At Home,” and to-day even Christopher Brent would scarcely have chosen or been allowed to do detective work, however brilliant, instead of donning khaki; but the spy-peril is sufficient of a reality, and an invasion of the East Coast is sufficiently conceivable for [the play] not to have lost its savour of piquancy. Half the attractiveness, too, of [the] story, as of its hero, was the humour which was so neatly blended with what was exciting and topical; and though seaside girls have no longer occasion to present young men with white feathers, the contrast between bluster which can teach other people how to do things, and modesty which quietly performs its task, has still as much point as ever. So that the revival of the popular piece is welcome, and wins the old laughs' (Illustrated London News, 29 July 1916). ‘One of the best, if not the only really good war play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” was well worth reviving, and with so admirable a company as is performing at the Royalty this story of German spies and of an Englishman’s cunning makes a capital entertainment' (The People, 30 July 1916). ‘A diagnosis - excuse the term, though it reeks of the operating theatre, and of invalids - of the general taste in drama during the past year shows that there has been no demand, in particular, for plays meant seriously. So says The Stage. Nor did it want War-plays realistic in character. To the latter, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” which went on flourishing from the previous season, and “Kulture at Home,” which was by no means a happy study of either English or German manners, formed the nearest approach, and they were plays considerably removed from the terrible actualities of war, for which the theatre has at the present time no aesthetic place. Generally, the favours of the theatre-going public were distributed with an impartial hard to anything in the ordinary run, not too much of anything’ (Hull Daily Mail, 4 August 1916). The closing date for the run of 19 August is given by the fact that it was last advertised in the Daily Mirror on that date and the play The Misleading Lady, with Malcolm Cherry, was ‘now in active rehearsal’ according to the Sunday Mirror of 20 August.
31 Jul 1916 West Pier Theatre, BrightonProfessional
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The Era, 2 August 1916, advertised The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 31 July at the West Pier, Brighton.
7 Aug 1916 Theatre Royal, WorthingProfessional
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The Era, 2 August 1916, advertised The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 7 August at the T.R., Worthing. The Worthing Gazette, 2 August 1916, advertised ‘The Successful Royalty Theatre Spy Play’ The Man Who Stayed at Home on the following Monday-Wednesday [7-9 August] at the Worthing Theatre.
7 Aug 1916 Royalty Theatre, MorecambeProfessional
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‘Mr. George Howard has been engaged by Mr. Taylor Platt to play Christopher Brent in “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” opening Morecambe on Aug. 7’ (The Era, 19 July 1916). The Era, 2 August 1916, advertised The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 7 August at the Royalty, Morecambe.
14 Aug 1916 Theatre Royal, PlymouthProfessional
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‘Still continuing to twice nightly next week, Mr. Glover presents “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” the successful spy play, which is still running at the Royalty Theatre, London. It is the work of Lechmere Worrall and J. E. Harold Terry, and is in three acts, each act being amusing and at the same time thrilling … The strong cast includes:- Clifford Marle, Charles H. Mortimer, J. Edward Pearce, C. Laverack Brown. Russell Bendle, Malcolm Cumming, Valerie Richards, Greta Wood, Hilda Francks, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, Edith Cuthbert' (Western Morning News, 12 August 1916). The Era, 16 August 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 14 August at the T.R., Plymouth.
14 Aug 1916 New Palace, Westcliffe-On-SeaProfessional
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The Era, 16 August 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 14 August at the New Palace Theatre, Westcliff-on-Sea.
21 Aug 1916 Prince's Theatre, BristolProfessional
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The Era, 16 and 23 August 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 21 August at the Prince’s Theatre, Bristol. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home”. This exciting yet amusing war play pays a return visit [to the Prince’s Theatre]. Although those portions of it that deal with the baiting of the young Englishman for not enlisting are out of date, the main story of the foiling of the German spies plot remains excellent dramatic material. How Christopher Brent behind a fatuous exterior that so splendidly averted suspicion used his resourceful brain and was so useful to the country that he could not be spared from it, is now familiar history. It would spoil the pleasure of those who will be going to see the play this week to detail again the incidents, so we recommend them to see for themselves ... The play was very well received’ (Western Daily Press, 22 August 1916). The actors are listed in the Western Daily Press, Saturday 19 August 1916.
21 Aug 1916 County Theatre, BedfordProfessional
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The Era, 16 and 23 August 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 21 August at the County Theatre, Bedford. Reviewed in the Bedfordshire Times and Independent, 25 August 1916. The cast included George Howard (Christopher Brent), Agnes Thornton (Miriam Leigh), Nora Kingsley (Mrs. Sanderson), Ernest Stidwell (Carl Sanderson), Herbert Rouen (Fritz), Dorothy Hall (Fraulein Schroeder).
28 Aug 1916 Opera House, CoventryProfessional
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The Era, 23 and 30 August 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 28 August at the O.H., Coventry. ‘A very large number of people last night witnessed the production at the Opera House of the successful spy play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” all parts of the building being crowded … [It] may be heartily recommended to people in search of an enjoyable evening. It is a fascinating play produced by a well-balanced and very able company. The atmosphere is altogether refreshing, and whether enemy spying is or is not as widespread as some newspapers appear to believe, the play serves a good public purpose in that it concentrates attention on a subject upon which many people feel strongly’. The cast was Clifford Marle (Christopher Brent), Valerie Richards (Miriam Leigh), Hilda Francks (Mrs Sanderson), C. H. Mortimer (Carl Sanderson), Russell Bendle (Fritz), Ethel Coleridge (Fraulein Schroeder), Greta Wood (Molly Preston), Edward Pearce (John Preston), C. Laverack-Brown (Percival Pennicuick [sic]), Malcolm Cumming (Corporal Atkins), Frances Waring (Miss Myrtle), and Edith Cuthbert (Daphne Kidlington). Coventry Evening Telegraph, 29 August 1916.
28 Aug 1916 Theatre Royal, NorwichProfessional
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The Era, 23 and 30 August 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 28 August at the T.R., Norwich.
4 Sep 1916 Theatre Royal, BoltonProfessional
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The Era, 30 August and 6 September 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 4 September at the T.R., Bolton.
4 Sep 1916 Theatre Royal, ColchesterProfessional
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The Era, 30 August and 6 September 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 4 September at the T.R., Colchester.
11 Sep 1916 Theatre Royal, GlasgowProfessional
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The Era, 6 and 13 September 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 11 September at the T.R., Glasgow. ‘Produced shortly after the commencement of the war, and on the round of the Metropolis and provinces almost continuously since, “The Man Who Stayed at Home" ... maintains a successful career. This week it is on a return visit to the city in the Royal Theatre, and last night it had a warm welcome from a well-filled house. The scenes are laid mainly in an East Coast boarding-house, and the spy question and wireless telegraphy furnish leading features. Mr Clifford Marle plays the principal part of the Secret Agent, Christopher Brent, and Miss Valerie Richards is Miriam Lee [sic – Leigh], the heroine. The other parts are also in capable hands’. The Scotsman, 12 September 1916.
11 Sep 1916 Kursaal Theatre, BognorProfessional
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The Era, 6 and 13 September 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 11 September at the Kursaal T., Bognor. ‘The first three nights of next week, with a matinee Wednesday at 3, will see a welcome return visit of the absorbing spy play from the Royalty Theatre, “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” The remarkable success achieved by this powerful play last year will be in everyone’s memory, and a repetition of the crowded houses to which Kursaal playgoers are now becoming accustomed, will suggest to the wary the advisability of booking well in advance’. Chichester Observer, 6 September 1916.
18 Sep 1916 County Theatre, ReadingProfessional
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The Era, 13 and 20 September 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 18 September at the County T., Reading. Previewed in the Reading Observer, 16 September 1916, which listed the actors. ‘Quite apart from its patriotic purpose there must be some reason why “The Man who Stayed at Home,” which is being played this week at the Royal County Theatre, Reading, has had such a successful career. It reached its third year at the Royalty Theatre, London, and has been performed over 1,500 times. Perhaps the reason of its extended popularity is that the authors have not attempted anything fantastic or highly improbable, but have been content to portray a story which, while it has its thrilling situations, is well within the bounds of possibility. Another strong point is its humour, which is constantly bubbling up ... The cast is a capable one all round, and the play is one which is fulfilling a distinctly national object in focussing attention on a subject which has in the past been treated as of scant importance’ (Reading Mercury, 23 September 1916).
18 Sep 1916 Tyne Theatre, NewcastleProfessional
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The Era, 13 and 20 September 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 18 September at the Tyne, Newcastle-on-Tyne. ‘Although Messrs. Worrell and Terry wrote their play, “The Man who Stayed at Home,” with a purpose yet, after that purpose has been fulfilled, so amusing and so thrilling is it that many people are still willing to pay for admission and enjoy it sheerly on its merits, and the audience at the Tyne Theatre, Newcastle, last night, evidently enjoyed it. In truth the play seems to have improved since its first performance, or it grows on the spectator, and the cross purposes of the German spies and their English hosts are well worked out. Mr. Taylor Platt has placed the play in the hands of a competent company. Mr Clifford Marle proves himself an excellent actor in the part of Christopher Brent, and John Preston, J.P., finds a refined interpreter in Mr J. Edward Pearce. Mr. Charles H. Mortimer, Mr C. Laverack Brown, Mr. Russell Bendle, Miss Greta Wood, Miss Ethel Coleridge and Miss Edith Cuthbert fill other parts with credit’. Newcastle Daily Chronicle, 19 September 1916.
25 Sep 1916 Theatre Royal, CanterburyProfessional
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The Era, 20 and 27 September 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 25 September at the T.R., Canterbury.
25 Sep 1916 Hippodrome, DarlingtonProfessional
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The Era, 20 and 27 September 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 25 September at the H., Darlington. ‘“The Man Who Stayed At Home,” the spy play, is being presented twice-nightly [at the Hippodrome, Darlington], with Clifford Marle, C. H. Mortimer, J. Edward Pearce, Malcolm Cumming, C. Laverack Brown, Hilda Francks, Valerie Richards, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, Edith Cuthbert, and Greta Wood in the cast’. The Stage, 27 September 1916.
2 Oct 1916 Opera House, WakefieldProfessional
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The Era, 27 September and 4 October 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 2 October at the O.H., Wakefield.
2 Oct 1916 Palace, WatfordProfessional
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The Era, 27 September and 4 October 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 2 October at the Palace, Watford.
9 Oct 1916 Hippodrome, Stockton-on-TeesProfessional
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The Era, 4 and 11 October 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 9 October at the H., Stockton. ‘There is a special attraction this week [at the Hippodrome, Stockton] in the great play “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” which deals with the events of the moment. The two important characters are “the man who stayed at home” and the head of the German, spies. The Englishman scents a dark intrigue in the interests the “Fatherland” and represents himself as a timid, feather-brained Britisher. This puts the spy completely off his guard, and half his devices are thwarted before discovers that the “fool” is a man of infinitely greater nerve and resource than himself. The company, which is comprised of a number powerful artistes, is the same that has visited the leading provincial towns in a most successful tour. The play has been performed over 1,600 times’. Daily Gazette for Middlesbrough, 10 October 1916.
9 Oct 1916 Theatre Royal, Leamington SpaProfessional
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The Era, 4 and 11 October 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 9 October at the T.R., Leamington. ‘Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of next week will see an excellent company’s presentation of “The Man Who Stayed at Home”' at the Theatre Royal, Leamington. (Warwick and Warwickshire Advertiser, 7 October 1916). ‘Those who stayed at home at the beginning of the week missed something by not seeing “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” There is no need for us to dwell on the merits of this spy play for they are already very widely known. Large audiences attended all the performances of the three-night engagement, and everybody seemed to enjoy thoroughly the thrills and humour of the thing’ ( Warwick and Warwickshire Advertiser, 14 October 1916).
16 Oct 1916 Opera House, BlackpoolProfessional
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The Era, 11 and 18 October 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 16 October at the O.H., Blackpool.
16 Oct 1916 Theatre Royal, BathProfessional
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The Era, 11 and 18 October 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 16 October at the T.R., Bath. ‘At the Theatre Royal next week Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s company will present “The Man Who Stayed at Home” ... This play has now been performed over 1,500 times, and has visited all the important towns in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. It is a play which deals with the events of the moment, and has several episodes of great dramatic power and is full of humour' (Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette, 14 October 1916).
23 Oct 1916 New Queen's Theatre, ManchesterProfessional
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The Era, 18 and 25 October 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 23 October at the New Queen’s Theatre, Manchester. ‘The successful spy play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” is paying another visit to Manchester, and is presented with conspicuous skill by Mr. E. T. Platt’s company. Not a single one of the play’s many thrilling moments failed to stir the emotions of the audience, and the humorous aspect of the story was fully brought out. Mr. Clifford Marle as the disingenuous “nut” who turns the tables on the spies; Miss Coleridge as a typical fraulein; and Mr. J. E. Pearce act with distinction' (Manchester Evening News, 24 October 1916).
23 Oct 1916 Theatre and Opera House, CheltenhamProfessional
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The Era, 18 and 25 October 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 23 October at the O.H., Cheltenham. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home,” the very attractive German spy play being performed by E. Taylor Platt’s Company at the Cheltenham Theatre and Opera House this week, was written at the time when everybody was wondering why everybody else did not “join up,” and impertinent flappers were presenting young fellows with white feathers in the superb conviction the flapper has of her own importance and the omniscient wisdom of her silliness. The man who stayed home in this case was one who had business for the Empire which made his presence much more important at home than anywhere else and the work he was doing is the subject matter of as gripping a play as need be seen. For who does not love a spy or a detective story? – and this is both the one and the other, with elements of thrilling drama, pleasant humour, and much good national character study thrown in' (Cheltenham Chronicle, 28 October 1916).
30 Oct 1916 Theatre Royal, BirkenheadProfessional
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The Era, 25 October and 1 November 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 30 October at the T.R., Birkenhead. ‘The thrilling spy play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” riveted the attention of large audiences last evening. There are some gripping situations in the story, and in the hands of the present company there is not a dull moment' (Liverpool Echo, 31 October 1916).
30 Oct 1916 Theatre Royal, WorcesterProfessional
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The Era, 25 October and 1 November 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 30 October at the New T.R., Worcester.
6 Nov 1916 Theatre Royal, GranthamProfessional
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Theatre Royal, Grantham, 6-11 November 1916 The Era, 1 November 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 6 November at the T.R., Grantham. ‘A most attractive twice-nightly play is seen at the Empire this week, viz., “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” It has an ingeniously thought-out plot, and deals with a party of German spies who occupy a boarding establishment, and interest is centred in Christopher Brent (Mr. Geo. Howard), “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” He takes up residence at the boarding house, and by cleverly assuming the part of a brainless dude, succeeds in bringing the spies to justice. To-night, the final performances will be given, at 6.45 and 9’ (Grantham Journal, 11 November 1916).
6 Nov 1916 Empire, PengeProfessional
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The Era, 1 November 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 6 November at the Emp., Penge. ‘“The Man who Stayed at Home” pays a welcome visit to Penge next week at the Empire Theatre, and will be looked forward to with great interest. It is a strong as well as an amusing play, dealing with the absorbing interesting spy question, and is, indeed, the play of the moment. Produced at the Royalty Theatre, London, on December 10th, 1914, it achieved instantaneous success because it is thrilling, and at the same time amusing. It deals with the burning question of foreign spies on the East coast. It reflects the Empire of to-day. It appeals to young and old alike, to civilian as much as to soldier. The devices used by the spies are drawn from what has actually occurred. Although it deals with war time, there is no suggestion of the horrors of war. Theatregoers have seldom had the opportunity of witnessing such an interesting play as “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” Such a play needs a fine company, and the name of Taylor Platt. who presents it, is a sure guarantee of the efficiency of the players. The strong cast includes Clifford Marle, Charles H. Mortimer, J. Edward Pearce, C. Laverack-Brown, Russell Bendle, Malcolm Cumming, Valerie Richards, Greta Wood, Hilda Franks, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, Edith Cuthbert’ (Norwood News, 3 November 1916).
13 Nov 1916 Theatre Royal, AldershotProfessional
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The Era, 15 November 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 13 November at the T.R., Aldershot.
13 Nov 1916 Grand Theatre, DerbyProfessional
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The Era, 15 November 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 13 November at the Grand, Derby. ‘Of all the war plays with which the stage was deluged in the early months of the great conflict, “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is one of the very few which have survived to the present time. This play, however, has had quite a remarkable run, and it has already been performed over 1,600 times. It is being produced at the Grand Theatre this week by Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s Company, and the initial performances on Monday were witnessed by large audiences. As is well known, the play was originally intended to emphasise the dangers which undoubtedly existed by reason of the number of German spies at large in this country, but the authorities having successfully countered their evil designs, the play may now be said to appeal to theatre-goers simply and solely by reason of the interesting episode it unfolds ... the play will doubtless attract attention and good audiences during the week’ (Derby Daily Telegraph, 14 November 1916).
20 Nov 1916 Hippodrome, Richmond-upon-thamesProfessional
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The Era, 15 and 22 November 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 20 November at the H., Richmond.
20 Nov 1916 Royal Court Theatre, WarringtonProfessional
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The Era, 15 and 22 November 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 20 November at the Royal Court, Warrington. The Nantwich Guardian and the Runcorn Guardian, 21 November 1916, advertised ‘The Enormously Successful Spy Play’ The Man Who Stayed at Home that week at the Royal Court Theatre, Warrington.
27 Nov 1916 New Theatre, OxfordProfessional
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The Era, 22 and 29 November 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 27 November at the New, Oxford. ‘The attraction here [New Theatre, Oxford] for the first part of this week is “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” presented very ably by Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s company. With Clifford Marle as Christopher Brent, the efficient cast includes Chas. H. Mortimer, J. Edward Pearce, C. Laverack-Brown, Russell Bendle, Malcolm Cumming, Hilda Franks, Valerie Richards, Greta Wood, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge and Edith Cuthbert. Mr. Herbert Jay’s company are occupying the boards for the latter part of the week with “Tiger’s Cub”‘. The Era, 29 November 1916.
27 Nov 1916 Grand Theatre, OldhamProfessional
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The Era, 22 and 29 November 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 27 November at the Grand, Oldham. ‘This week [at the Grand Theatre, Oldham] Mr. E. Taylor Platt presents “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” Miss Barbara Hall is a delightful Molly Preston, and others in the cast are Miss Nora Kingsley, Miss Dorothy Hall, Mr. Ernest Stillwell [sic - Stidwell], Mr. Herbert Rouen, Mr. George Howard, Miss Agnes Thornton, Miss Agnes Lowson, Miss Duff Earl Howard, Mr. Grahame Herington, Mr. Paul Pearce, and Mr. George Percy’ ( The Era, 29 November 1916).
30 Nov 1916 Gaiety Theatre, HastingsProfessional
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In the week after next ‘Mr. Arthur Hare’s Company will play “A Pair of Spectacles” for the first three nights, and Mr. Taylor Platt’s Company appears in “The Man Who Stayed at Home” for the latter part of the week’ (Hastings and St Leonards Observer, 18 November 1916). ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” pays a welcome return visit to Hastings the latter part of next week at the Gaiety Theatre … It is a strong as well as an amusing play dealing with the absorbing interesting spy question, and is, indeed, the play of the moment. There have been a good many plays written upon war subjects during the past year, but none have achieved the success of Lechmere Worrall and Harold Terry’s comedy … The cast includes Clifford Marle, Charles H. Mortimer, J. Edward Pearce, C Laverack-Brown, Russell Bendle, Malcolm Cumming; Valerie Richards, Greta Wood, Hilda Francks, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, Edith Cuthbert’ (Hastings and St Leonards Observer, 25 November 1916).
4 Dec 1916 Pleasure Gardens Theatre, FolkestoneProfessional
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The Era, 29 November and 6 December 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 4 December at the Pleasure Gardens, Folkestone. ‘When Lechmere Worrall and J. E. Harold Terry’s fine play was first performed at the Pleasure Gardens Theatre, it possessed the charm of novelty. Now, on its second visit, it has not that charm for many of us, but it attracts us all the same, for the simple reason that it is a production which one can see over and over again without being tired of it. The topical character of the theme, of course, goes a long way, but that is not all. Sometimes topical plays are crudely worked out with little regard to virility of dialogue and the canons of dramatic art. That, however, is not so in this instance. Far from it, for the situations are admirably and most effectively contrived, every “curtain” being a strong one, whilst in the last act we are wrought to a high tension with guns of the British destroyers booming out their deep notes. The characters are powerfully delineated, and plenty of comedy is worked in to relieve the more serious aspect of the subject' (Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate and Cheriton Herald, 9 December, 1916). 'It was a dastardly plot that Brent frustrated - nothing less, forsooth, than the landing of German troops in England. How he did it - how he met cunning with cunning, resource with resource - will be seen by visiting the Pleasure Gardens Theatre this week, where Mr. E. Taylor Platt is presenting “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” a spy-play in three acts. It is performed twice nightly, but there is no “cutting,” and the play goes with fine speed. It is thrilling and gripping, and it is humorous, giving a clever commingling of emotions' (Folkestone Express, Sandgate, Shorncliffe & Hythe Advertiser, 9 December 1916).
4 Dec 1916 Grand, WolverhamptonProfessional
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The Era, 29 November and 6 December 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 4 December at the Grand, Wolverhampton.
11 Dec 1916 Grand Theatre, LutonProfessional
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The Era, 6 December 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 11 December at the Grand, Luton. The Luton Reporter, 11 December 1916, advertised ‘the enormously successful Spy Play’ The Man Who Stayed at Home at the Grand Theatre, Luton.
11 Dec 1916 Empire Theatre, Kingston-upon-ThamesProfessional
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The Era, 6 December 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 11 December at the Empire, Kingston. ‘“The Man who stayed at Home,” the successful spy play from the Royalty Theatre, London, will be played at the Kingston Empire twice nightly next week by E. Taylor Platt’s company. Based on the new life we are living, the play is thrilling and at the same time amusing. It deals with the burning question of foreign spies on the East Coast, and the devices used by the spies in the play are drawn from what has actually occurred' (Surrey Advertiser, 9 December 1916). ‘Of plays about the war none could be more popular than “The Man who stayed at Home” ... It is an intensely interesting story dealing with a feature in the incipient stages of the international struggle that aroused a keen sense of indignation among honest, plain dealing British folk, namely the espionage and treachery of supposed friends ... the large audiences of the week are delighted with it. The play is both thrilling and amusing, and justifies all that has been said in its praise’ (Surrey Advertiser, 16 December 1916).
18 Dec 1916 Hippodrome, Willesden, LondonProfessional
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The Era, 13 December 1916, advertised for the week commencing 18 December the Taylor Platt company in The Man Who Stayed at Home at the Willesden Hippodrome. The Era, 20 December 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 18 December at the Hippo., Willesden.
26 Dec 1916 Royalty, Barrow-in-FurnessProfessional
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The Era, 20 and 27 December 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 26 December at the Royalty, Barrow-in-Furness. ‘E. Taylor Platt presents “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ at the Royalty Theatre, Barrow-in-Furness (The Era, 27 December 1916).
1 Jan 1917 Her Majesty's Theatre, CarlisleProfessional
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The Era, 27 December 1916, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 1 January at H.M.T., Carlisle; also The Stage, 4 January 1917. 'The Taylor Platt Company (Blue) of “The Man Who Stayed at Home” played to very good business at Carlisle last week, Mr. George Howard playing the part of Christopher Brent as before' (The Era, 10 January 1917).
8 Jan 1917 Paisley Theatre, PaisleyProfessional
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The Era, 10 January 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 8 January at the Paisley Theatre, Paisley.
15 Jan 1917 King's Theatre, GreenockProfessional
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The Era, 10 and 17 January 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 15 January at the King’s, Greenock. ‘“The Man who Stayed at Home” pays a welcome visit to Greenock next weak at the Ring’s Theatre, and will be looked forward to with great interest. It is a strong as well as an amusing play dealing with the absorbing interesting spy question, and is indeed the play of the moment. There have been a good many plays written upon war subjects during the past year, but none have achieved the success of Lechmere Worrall and J. E. Harold Terry’s Comedy. Produced at the Royalty Theatre, London, on December 10th, 1914, it achieved instantaneous success because it is thrilling and at the same time amusing. It deals with the burning question of Foreign Spies on the East Coast. It reflects the Empire of to-day. It appeals to young and old alike, to civilian as much as to soldier. The devices used by the spies are drawn from what has actually occurred. Although it deals with war time there is no suggestion of the horrors of war. Theatre-goers have seldom had the opportunity of witnessing such an interesting play, as “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ (Port-Glasgow Express, 12 January 1917).
22 Jan 1917 Lyceum Theatre, DumfriesProfessional
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‘The delightfully entertaining play, “The Man who stayed at home,” visits Dumfries next week, and will be staged at the Lyceum on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday evenings. It has been described as the play of the moment, and the company is a strong one’ (Dumfries and Galloway Standard, 17 January 1917). Previewed in the Dumfries and Galloway Standard, 20 January 1917: ‘The cast includes: George Howard, Russell Bendle, Owen Cassidy, Herbert Rouen, George Percy, J. Edward Pearce, Nora Kingsley, Agnes Thornton, Barbara Hall, Agnes Lowson, Duff Earle Howard, Ethel Coleridge’. ‘It is not surprising that “The Man who Stayed at Home” made such a hit when first produced in London. It was placed before the public just when the German spy scare was at its height: and if, as one would imagine, the play is founded to a certain extent upon fact, the British Secret Service must have had a very busy time discovering and harrying the nests of the Teutonic wasps that apparently swarmed in our coast resorts and elsewhere. It is an excellent play, thrilling at one moment, amusing the next, with here and there an anti-climax clever as it is funny. In these days, of course, when spies and war generally have become part of our daily life, the piece does not possess the same degree of appeal that it did earlier, but it still has the power to thrill ' (Dumfries and Galloway Standard, 24 January 1917).
25 Jan 1917 ?, AyrProfessional
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The Stage, 25 January 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 25 January at Ayr for three days.
25 Jan 1917 King's Hall Theatre, Covent Garden, LondonAmateur
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‘Still working with the double object of providing exhilarating entertainment and contributing to War Charities, the Vaudeville D.C. presented “The Man Who Stayed at Home” most successfully at their 217th dramatic performance, which took place, as usual, at King’s Hall, Covent Garden, on Thursday, January 25. The popular Lechmere Worrall – Harold Terry piece was presented with solicitous attention to detail ... “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” thus admirably given by the Vaudeville D.C., afforded unfeigned delight to an audience that thronged all parts of King’s Hall. Mr. Albert Harris and his zealous associates must be congratulated upon their success in “carrying on”‘. The Stage, 1 February 1917.
29 Jan 1917 Empire, Camberwell, LondonProfessional
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'The [Taylor Platt] Red Company opens its spring tour at the Empire, Camberwell, on Jan. 29’ (The Era, 10 January 1917). The Era, 24 and 31 January 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Company) as On The Road from 29 January at the Empire, Camberwell. Also The Stage, 25 January 1917.
29 Jan 1917 Grand Theatre, FalkirkProfessional
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The Era, 24 and 31 January 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 29 January at the Grand, Falkirk. Also The Stage, 25 January 1917. ‘That the famous spy play, “The Man Who Stayed At Home,” should be received at the Grand with every mark of enthusiasm and appreciation is only to be expected. It is unique in its topical interest, based as it is upon stern realities, and having as its theme a subject which has been, and still is, if perhaps now in lesser degree, a serious one for this country. That special interest and the entertaining way in which the thrilling incidents and grim purposes of the play are focussed against a light and subtle humour combine to make “The Man Who Stayed At Home” a production which cannot fail to merit the highest public favour ... Superficially, humour is the outstanding feature, and laughter goes with a ripple from start to finish. Attractive in itself, this serves to bring the serious element into sharper contrast, and intensifies the interest. The story puts into an amusing setting the spy problem with which this country has had to grapple since the outbreak of the war. The play has a purpose in showing that the (apparently) innocent Teuton who runs a boarding-house, and who has become naturalised, may prove a very deadly foe ' (Falkirk Herald, 3 February 1917).
5 Feb 1917 Grand Theatre, DoncasterProfessional
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The Era, 31 January 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 5 February at the Grand, Doncaster. Also The Stage, 8 February 1917.
5 Feb 1917 Hippodrome, Golders Green, LondonProfessional
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The Era, 31 January 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Company) as On The Road from 5 February at the Hippodrome, Golder’s Green. Also The Stage, 8 February 1917.
12 Feb 1917 Grand Theatre, HullProfessional
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The Era, 14 February 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 12 February at the Grand, Hull. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” pays a return visit to the Grand Theatre next week. Such a play needs a fine company, and the name of Taylor Platt, who presents it, is a sure guarantee of the efficiency of the players. The cast includes:- Clifford Marle, Charles H. Mortimer, Arthur Grenville, C. Laverack-Brown, Russell Bendle, Malcolm Cumming, Valerie Richards, Christine Cooper, Hilda Francks, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge and Edith Cuthbert’ (Hull Daily Mail, 9 February 1917). ‘It is the singularly good luck of “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” which a fairly large audience witnessed last night, that the submarine campaign is proceeding. For the pivot of the drama is nothing less than U-boats and signals from the coast [Germany had just resumed a policy of unrestricted submarine warfare]. Many current questions are deftly exploited in the course of it' (Hull Daily Mail, 13 February 1917). Noted in The Era, 14 February 1917.
12 Feb 1917 New Theatre, CambridgeProfessional
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The Stage, 8 February 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 12 February at Cambridge (3 days) and Peterborough (3 days); and The Era, 14 February 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 12 February at the New, Cambridge. Previewed in the Cambridge Daily News, 10 February 1917: 'The strong cast includes George Howard, Howard Brenan, Besley Beltran, Owen Cassidy, Herbert Rouen, George Percy, Nora Kingsley, Agnes Thornton, Barbara Hall, Agnes Lowson, Lilian St. Maur, Duff Earle-Howard’. '‘When “The Man Who Stayed at Home” was first produced in London many critics expressed the opinion that as the war progressed the play, the action of which takes place in September, 1914, would become hopelessly out of date. The reception of the play last night at the New Theatre, where it was produced by Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s company, shows how erroneous were those opinions. Despite the fact that many developments have taken place in the war since the date of the play, the plot has lost neither in interest nor in excitement. And for this reason: that the events with which it deals might happen in any modern war ... The authors ... invented a plot of thrilling interest, and used the war as a background' (Cambridge Daily News, 13 February 1917).
15 Feb 1917 Grand Theatre, PeterboroughProfessional
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The Stage, 8 February 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 12 February at Cambridge (3 days) and Peterborough (3 days). ‘On the last three nights E. Taylor Platt presents “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ at the Grand, Peterborough (The Era, 14 February 1917).
19 Feb 1917 Empire, RotherhamProfessional
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The Era, 14 and 21 February 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 19 February at the Empire, Rotherham. ‘E. Taylor Platt’s company appear [at the Empire, Rotherham] with “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” Included in an excellent cast are Clifford Marle, Chas. H. Mortimer, Arthur Prenville (sic – Grenville), Russell Bendall (sic – Bendle), C. L. Brown, Malcolm Cumming, Valeria (sic – Valerie) Richards, Christine Cooper, Hilda Franks (sic – Francks), Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, and Edith Cuthbert’ (The Stage, 22 February 1917).
19 Feb 1917 Lyceum Theatre, IpswichProfessional
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The Era, 14 and 21 February 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 19 February at the Lyceum, Ipswich.
26 Feb 1917 Opera House, St HelensProfessional
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The Era, 21 February 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 26 February at the Opera House, St. Helens.
26 Feb 1917 Theatre Royal, ColchesterProfessional
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The Era, 21 February 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 26 February at the T.R., Colchester.
5 Mar 1917 Theatre Royal, HuddersfieldProfessional
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The Era, 7 March 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 5 March at the T.R., Huddersfield. ‘E. Taylor Platt presents “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ at the Theatre Royal, Huddersfield (The Era, 7 March 1917).
5 Mar 1917 Empire, SwindonProfessional
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The Era, 7 March 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 5 March at the Empire, Swindon. Previewed in the North Wilts Herald, 2 March 1917: ‘The strong cast includes George Howard, Howard Brenan, Besley Beltram, Owen Cassidy, Herbert Rouen, George Percy, Nora Kingsley, Agnes Thornton, Barbara Hall, Agnes Lowson, Lilian St. Maur and Duff Earle-Howard. The piece will be presented twice nightly’.
10 Mar 1917 Woodside Hall, FinchleyAmateur
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‘Crowded and enthusiastic audiences filled the Woodside Hall on Saturday, Monday and Tuesday evenings, when what may safely be described as the Finchley Amateur Dramatic Society’s premier performance was given. The whole success of the play depended absolutely and entirely on the quality of the acting, and never has more genuine talent been staged by the Society at any time. One very capable critic was heard to remark that the performance was almost if not quite equal to the play as seen by him several times with the original cast at “The Royalty,” where many will remember its long and successful run. The Society possesses one great gift which must always go a very long way towards ensuring success - that of fitting square peg in a square hole. We have very seldom seen a cast more suited to the various characters than that which so delighted the audiences on the three evenings mentioned ... During the evening an interesting announcement was made by the secretary of the Society (Mr. S. Coomber). On Saturday afternoon a matinee performance was given to a large number of wounded soldiers, but unfortunately those invited from King Edward Hall, Church-end, Finchley, were unable to be present, to the mutual disappointment of hosts and guests. It has therefore been decided to give another matinee for wounded soldiers on Saturday, March 17th, and an extra performance in the evening’ (Hendon & Finchley Times, Friday 16 March 1917).
12 Mar 1917 Garrison Theatre, TidworthProfessional
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The Era, 7 and 14 March 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 12 March at the Garrison, Tidworth. Also The Stage, 15 March 1917.
12 Mar 1917 Theatre Royal, YorkProfessional
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The Era, 7 and 14 March 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 12 March at the Royal, York. Also The Stage, 15 March 1917.
19 Mar 1917 Theatre Royal, PortsmouthProfessional
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The Hampshire Telegraph, 16 March 1917, advertised The Man Who Stayed at Home twice nightly at the Theatre Royal, Portsmouth, the following week. Previewed in the Hampshire Telegraph, 16 March 1917. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” is being staged here [the Theatre Royal, Portsmouth] by Mr. H. (sic – E.) Taylor Platt’s company, Mr. Clifford Marle [a member of Taylor Platt's 'red' company] playing the part of Christopher Brent in an able manner’. The Era, 21 March 1917. [N.B.: The Era, 14 and 21 March 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 19 March at the Shakespeare, Liverpool; also The Stage, 15 March 1917. But the Liverpool Echo, 17 March 1917, advertised performances by the Harrison Frewin Opera Company at the Shakespeare Theatre for the whole of the following week.]
19 Mar 1917 Garrison Theatre, BulfordProfessional
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The Era, 14 and 21 March 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 19 March at the Garrison, Bulford. Also The Stage, 15 March 1917.
26 Mar 1917 Opera House, ScarboroughProfessional
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The Era, 21 and 28 March 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 26 March at the O.H., Scarborough (3 days) and the O.H., Harrogate (3 days). ‘ “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is presented [at the Grand Opera House, Scarborough] by Taylor Platt’s company. This is the third visit. Clifford Marle is excellent as Christopher Brent. Violet (sic - Valerie) Richards is a good Miriam Leigh. Hilda Francks is quite at home as Mrs. Sanderson. Frank Henry is an effective Carl, and Russell Bendle a forcible Fritz. Malcolm Cumming, Arthur Grenville, C. Leverack-Brown, Christie (sic – Christine) Cooper, Ethel Coleridge, Edith Cuthbert, and Frances Waring do well in their respective parts’ (The Stage, 29 March 1917).
26 Mar 1917 Dalston Theatre, LondonProfessional
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The Era, 21 and 28 March 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 26 March at the Dalston Theatre, Dalston. ‘Mr. E. Taylor Platt presents [at the Dalston Theatre] this week the play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” Mr. George Howard quite pleases his audience with his clever portrayal of the quietly wide-awake Christopher Brent. Mr. Howard Brenan, as Carl Sanderson, and Miss Nora Kingsley, as Mrs. Sanderson, efficiently portray the enemy element, and they are effectively supported by Mr. Herbert Rouen, as Fritz, and Miss Lilian St. Maud (sic - Maur), as Fraulein Schroder (sic). Mr. W. Besley Beltran is refreshingly English as John Preston, J.P., and Miss Barbara Hall is also unmistakeably British as Molly Preston. The same hall-mark distinguishes Mr. George Percy as Corporal Atkins. The efficient cast also includes Mr. Owen Cassidy, Miss Agnes Thornton, Miss Agnes Lowson, and Miss Duff Earle Howard’. The Era, 28 March 1917.
29 Mar 1917 Opera House, HarrogateProfessional
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The Era, 21 and 28 March 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 26 March at the O.H., Scarborough (3 days) and the O.H., Harrogate (3 days).
2 Apr 1917 Grand, LeedsProfessional
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The Era, 28 March and 4 April 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 2 April at the Grand, Leeds. Also The Stage, 5 April 1917. ‘While the. war lasts - and probably long after it has ended - spy plays will possess a peculiar attraction, and among them “The Man who stayed at Home,” which is paying its third visit to the Grand Theatre this week, will no doubt continue to be one of the most popular. It is well described as “a thrilling and amusing play,” for the means employed to bring about the dramatic climax - the exposure of a band of German spies – are diverting as well as clever' (Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, 3 April 1917). ‘While the war continues, a spy play has a favourable atmosphere to work in, and it is not surprising to find that “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is making a sure appeal in its third year ... It is, without doubt, a clever play, and is not too trying for sensitive persons, although the atmosphere of a desperate game is always there' (Leeds Mercury, 3 April 1917).
7 Apr 1917 Grand Pier Pavilion, Weston-Super-MareProfessional
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The Era, 4 and 11 April 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Blue) as On The Road from 9 April at the Pavilion, Weston-super-Mare. Also The Stage, 5 and 12 April 1917. ‘The first of nine local performances of “The Man Who Stayed at Home” was given with success on Saturday evening, before a large house [at the Grand Pier Pavilion, Weston-super-Mare]. George Howard ably sustained the name part, and was efficiently supported by W. Besley Beltran (Preston), Howard Brenan (Carl), E. J. B. King (Pennicuik), George Percy (Fritz), Nora Kingsley (Mrs. Sanderson), Agnes Thornton (Miriam), Barbara Hall (Molly), Agnes Lowson (Miss Myrtle), Lilian St. Maur (Fräulein), and Dorothy Smith (Daphne). Grahame Herington is E. Taylor Platt’s acting manager. The second matinée takes place to-day (Thursday)’. The Stage, 12 April 1917.
9 Apr 1917 West Pier Theatre, BrightonProfessional
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The Era, 4 and 11 April 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 9 April at the West Pier, Brighton. Also The Stage, 5 and 12 April 1917. The Mid Sussex Times, 10 April 1917, advertised The Man Who Stayed at Home that week at the West Pier, Brighton.
16 Apr 1917 Grand, SouthamptonProfessional
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The Era, 11 and 18 April 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 16 April at the Grand, Southampton. Also The Stage, 12 and 19 April 1917. ‘lf all the men who are staying at home in Southampton did so for the same reason as the Man who Stays at Home at the Grand Theatre, this week, no one would breathe a word against them. The play deals with the burning question of foreign spies on the East Coast. The incidents are thrilling, and at the same time amusing, the actors making the most of them … The play is well worth seeing, and especially Clifford Marle, as the hero, in the thrills of the last act. They appeal to young and old, civilian and soldier, and all sorts have been thronging the Theatre this week. The company is really excellent, and each part is played very cleverly’. Hampshire Advertiser, 21 April 1917.
23 Apr 1917 Pier Theatre, EastbourneProfessional
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The Era, 18 and 25 April 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 23 April at the Pier, Eastbourne. Also The Stage, 19 and 26 April 1917. Previewed in the Eastbourne Gazette, 18 April 1917, which listed the actors: Clifford Marle, Arthur Grenville, C. Laverack-Brown, J. Edward Pearce, Malcolm Cumming, Hilda Francks, Valerie Richards, Christine Cooper, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, Edith Cuthbert. ‘Previous visits of [The Man Who Stayed at Home] to the Pier Theatre proved very acceptable to Eastbourne audiences, and on Monday evening there was every sign that interest in the doings of Christopher Brent (the man who stayed at home) shows but little sign waning, the large audience being delighted with the thrilling episodes in one of the most successful plays of the times … Although the play is dramatic and intensely interesting, there is a welcome vein of genial humour which lightens the story’ (Eastbourne Gazette, 25 April 1917).
30 Apr 1917 Theatre Royal, ExeterProfessional
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The Era, 25 April and 2 May 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red) as On The Road from 30 April at the Royal, Exeter. Also The Stage, 26 April and 3 May 1917. Previewed in the Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 28 April 1917, which listed the actors: Clifford Marle, J. Edward Pearce, Arthur Grenville, C. Laverack-Browne, Malcolm Cumming, Valerie Richards, Christine Cooper, Hilda Francks, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, and Edith Cuthbert. ‘There is a special attraction the Theatre Royal. Exeter, this week, Mr. E, Taylor Platt fulfilling an engagement in that bright and thrilling play "The Man Who Stayed at Home" ... It is full of interest, and, exposing as it does the working of the "Unseen Hand,” has done much to arouse the people to a sense of the danger of foreign spies on the East Coast. While it throws an interesting sidelight on this question, the piece has no suggestion of the horrors of war. Intense interest is sustained throughout ... he play is enlivened by many amusing incidents, and the actors made the most of it' (Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 1 May 1917).
7 May 1917 Theatre Royal, TorquayProfessional
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The Era, 2 and 9 May 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Company) as On The Road from 7 May at the Opera House, Torquay. Also The Stage, 3 and 10 May 1917. ‘Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s company is here [the Theatre Royal, Torquay] on a return visit in “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” The leading role of Kit Brent is made a very convincing study by Mr. Clifford Marle, who receives most capable assistance from Miss Valerie Richards as Miriam Leigh. Mr. J. Edward Pearce is excellent in the somewhat unthankful part of Carl Sanderson, whilst Miss Hilda Francks as Mrs. Sanderson and Miss Ethel Coleridge as Fraulein Schroeder are both well placed. Miss Christine Cooper makes the best of Molly Preston, whilst the character of Mr. Preston is ably sustained by Mr. Arthur Grenville’ (The Era, 9 May 1917).
14 May 1917 Theatre Royal, BournemouthProfessional
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The Era, 9 and 16 May 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Company) as On The Road from 14 May at the Royal, Bournemouth. Also The Stage, 10 and 17 May 1917. ‘Once again the thrilling yet amusing spy play entitled “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is entertaining the patriotic patrons of the Theatre Royal ... This is, we believe, the third visit of the play to Bournemouth, yet its fascination has the same grip upon the audience as of yore ... “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is certainly a play of the times, and the more often one witnesses it, the greater is the pleasure derived’ (Bournemouth Graphic, 18 May 1917). ‘This capital play is paying its third visit to Bournemouth, and at the first performance on Monday night at the Theatre Royal was received, as on the two previous visits, with much enthusiasm ... The clever combination of comedy, drama, character-drawing, and general observation still draws crowded houses in all parts of the provinces, and it will surely continue to do so until the great day when the terrors of Prussianism are for ever removed and a satisfactory peace declared … The play is full of excitement and topical interest, and the authors are to be again congratulated upon their successful production' (Bournemouth Guardian, 19 May 1917).
21 May 1917 Hippodrome, CroydonProfessional
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The Era, 16 and 23 May 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Company) as On The Road from 21 May at the Hippo., Croydon. Also The Stage, 17 and 24 May 1917. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home. This famous spy play is to be produced at the Croydon Hippodrome next week. It gives one the real, complete, wholesome thrill one got as a boy over a detective yarn. Before 1914 the plain matter-of-fact person smiled with superior scepticism at stories of espionage, with their paraphernalia of weird mechanism and their human touches revealed in the wiles of adventuresses entrapping by their physical charms young officers possessing State documents. But now we know the novelist’s inventions to be no more weird than those of Hun engineers and chemists. Amid all its ingenuities and dramatic surprises the play still contrives throughout to be a comedy, and in that respect is quite entertaining. The cast includes Clifford Marle, J. Edward Pearce, Arthur Grenville, C. Laverack-Brown, Malcolm Cumming, E. J. B. King, Hilda Francks, Valerie Richards, Christine Cooper, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, Edith Cuthbert’ (Surrey Mirror, 18 May 1917).
28 May 1917 Royal Artillery Theatre, WoolwichProfessional
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The Era, 23 May 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Company) as On The Road from 28 May at the Artillery T., Woolwich. Also The Stage, 24 and 31 May 1917. Performance noted in The Stage, 31 May 1917.
4 Jun 1917 Opera House, BlackpoolProfessional
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The Stage, 31 May and 7 June 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 4 June at the O.H., Blackpool.
11 Jun 1917 Palace Theatre, Tottenham, LondonProfessional
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The Stage, 7 and 14 June 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 11 June at the Palace, Tottenham. The Era, 13 June 1917, carried an advertisement for ‘E. Taylor Platt. The Man Who Stayed at Home. This Week, Palace, Tottenham. Next Week, Palace, East Ham'.
18 Jun 1917 Palace, East HamProfessional
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The Stage, 14 and 21 June 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 18 June at the Palace, East Ham. The Era, 20 June 1917, carried an advertisement for ‘E. Taylor Platt. The Man Who Stayed at Home. This Week, Palace, East Ham. Next Week, Palace, Chelsea'.
25 Jun 1917 Palace Theatre, Chelsea, LondonProfessional
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‘The Chelsea Palace, so Mr. Geo. B. Andrews, the popular manager, informs us, is to have a change next week from its usual variety programme, “The Man Who Stayed at Home” having been booked’. The Era, 20 June 1917. The Stage, 21 and 28 June 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 25 June at the Palace, Chelsea.
2 Jul 1917 Palace Theatre, WalthamstowProfessional
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The Stage, 28 June and 5 July 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 2 July at the Palace, Walthamstow.
9 Jul 1917 Hippodrome, MargateProfessional
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The Stage, 5 and 12 July 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 9 July at the Hippo., Margate. The Thanet Advertiser, 7 July 1917, advertised The Man Who Stayed at Home at the Margate Hippodrome for Monday 9 July and during the week.
16 Jul 1917 Gaiety Theatre, HastingsProfessional
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The Stage, 12 and 19 July 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 16 July at the Gaiety, Hastings. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” Spy Play Next Week. This play gives you the real, complete, wholesome thrill you got as a boy over a detective yarn. You outgrow the capacity for that thrill as you become older, and you would not regain it in this play had not the war shown the most lurid fiction be no stranger than the truth. Before 1914 the plain, matter-of-fact person smiled with superior scepticism at stories of espionage, with their paraphernalia of weird mechanism and their human touches revealed in the wiles of adventuresses entrapping by their physical charms young officers possessing State documents. But now we know the novelist's inventions to be no more weird than those of Hun engineers and chemists. Amid all its ingenuities and dramatic surprises the play still contrives throughout to be a comedy, and in that respect is quite entertaining. The cast includes:- Clifford Marle, George Percy, E. J. B. King, J. Edward Pearce, Malcolm Cumming, Hilda Francks, Jean Stanley, Christine Cooper, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, and Edith Cuthbert’ (Hastings and St Leonards Observer, 14 July 1917).
23 Jul 1917 Training Camp, RiponProfessional
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‘Soldiers’ Theatre Opened. There has been set up an Entertainment Branch of the Navy and Army Canteen Board, and, under the direction of this body, several theatres have been erected at training camps in this country. One such has just been completed at Ripon, and it was opened on Saturday, amid much jubilation on the part of the men, by Lieut.-General Sir J. G. Maxwell, the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief Northern Command. The theatre is a modest building of wood, capable of seating 700, with standing space for an additional 100. It stands at the cross-roads, about midway between the North and South Camps, and is comfortably, though not ornately, furnished. Performances will be given in the theatre on the twice-nightly system, and the attraction for this week is Edgar Allan Brown's concert party “Charivari,” from Eastbourne. Next week the Garrison Theatre company will be here in the spy play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home.” Lieut.-General Maxwell, in opening the theatre on Saturday was accompanied by Lady Maxwell and Brigadier-General E. R. Simpson (G.O.C. Ripen Reserve Centre). There was a crowded gathering of officers and men. An excellent concert programme marked the opening “run”’ (Hull Daily Mail, 16 July 1917).
23 Jul 1917 ?, Colwyn BayProfessional
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The Stage, 19 July 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 23 July at Colwyn Bay (3 days) and Llandudno (3 days).
26 Jul 1917 ?, LlandudnoProfessional
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The Stage, 26 July 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 26 July at Llandudno (3 days).
30 Jul 1917 ?, RhylProfessional
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The Stage, 26 July 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 30 July at Rhyl (3 days) and Abergele (3 days).
2 Aug 1917 ?, AbergeleProfessional
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The Stage, 2 August 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 2 August at Abergele (3 days).
6 Aug 1917 Scala Theatre, SeacombeProfessional
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The Stage, 2 and 9 August 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 6 August at the Scala, Seacombe. ‘The attraction at the Seacombe Scala is “The Man Who Stayed at Home," a very cleverly-written espionage play, thrilling and humorous in turn. A secret wireless installation is a feature. It scored well last evening, and its visit to Seacombe is full of promise' (Liverpool Echo, 7 August 1917). ‘This popular place of amusement [the Scala, Seacombe] re-opened on Monday with E. Taylor Platt’s company with “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” and good business is being done. A fine cast includes Clifford Marle, Arthur Ellis, J. Edward Pearce, Malcolm Cumming, Jean Stanley, Valerie Richards, Christine Cooper, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, and Edith Cuthbert’ (The Stage, 9 August 1917).
13 Aug 1917 ?, Llandrindod WellsProfessional
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The Stage, 9 August 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 13 August at Llandrindod Wells (3 days) and Aberystwyth (3 days).
16 Aug 1917 Coliseum, AberystwythProfessional
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The Stage, 16 August 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 16 August at Aberystwyth (3 days). ‘During the latter part of the week the E. Taylor Platt company pay a welcome return visit [to the Coliseum, Aberystwyth] in “The Man Who Stayed at Home”’ (The Stage, 16 August 1917).
20 Aug 1917 Metropole, BootleProfessional
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The Stage, 16 and 23 August 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 20 August at the Metropole, Bootle.
27 Aug 1917 County Theatre, ShrewsburyProfessional
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The Stage, 23 and 30 August 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 27 August at the County, Shrewsbury. Also The Era, 29 August 1917. ‘One of the three war plays which have proved successful, "The Man Who Stayed at Home,” is the attraction at the County Theatre. Shrewsbury. The play will be presented by Mr. E. Taylor Platt's company’ (Birmingham Daily Gazette, 25 August 1917).
3 Sep 1917 Theatre and Opera House, CheltenhamProfessional
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The Stage, 30 August and 6 September 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 3 September at the O.H., Cheltenham. Also The Era, 29 August 1917. Previewed in the Gloucestershire Echo and the Cheltenham Chronicle, 1 September 1917, which listed the actors: Clifford Marle, T. Arthur Ellis, J. Edward Pearce, E King, Hilda Francks, Christine Cooper, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, Edith Cuthbert, Jean Stanley, and Malcolm Cumming, a Cheltonian, who will be remembered as chief assistant librarian’. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” commenced on Monday evening a week’s run at the Cheltenham Theatre … The play named above was as good a choice as could have been made for the starting of what we suppose must be termed the autumn season, for it made a great impression when here in October last year, and the subject with which it deals will not be stale for many a day to come' (Gloucestershire Echo, 4 September 1917). 'The play which has been presented [at the Theatre] since Monday last is The Man Who Stayed at Home ... It is one those plays which, written to meet a popular topical demand - the German spy question in this case - has turned out to be so full of good stuff that they continue to please after the demand has died down. The Man Who Stayed at Home is a capital combination of comedy, drama, character-drawing and general observation and is strongly acted' (Cheltenham Looker-On, 8 September 1917.
10 Sep 1917 Theatre Royal, AldershotProfessional
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The Stage, 6 and 13 September 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 10 September at the Royal, Aldershot.
17 Sep 1917 Kursaal Theatre, BognorProfessional
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The Stage, 13 September 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 17 September at the Kursaal, Bognor. ‘"The Man who Stayed at Home” … will pay a return visit to the Kursaal Theatre on Monday for three nights. "The Man who Stayed at Home' is one of the comparatively few plays which, written to meet a popular topical demand, turn out to be so full of good stuff that they continue to please after the demand has died down. Now “The Man who Stayed at Home” is such a capital play, such a clever combination of comedy, drama, character drawing and general observation. that it not only still gaily draws its crowded houses in the provinces, but will, we venture to prophesy, one of these days have a glorious resurrection long after we have all become well accustomed to the piping times of peace. Besides, somehow or other, it does remarkably well suggest the atmosphere of those early, never-to-be-forgotten days of 1914 – those days “a few months since, an age ago.” The cast includes Clifford Marle, J. Edward Pearce, Arthur Ellis, Malcolm Cumming, E. J. B. King, Hilda Franck (sic - Francks), Jean Stanley, Christine Cooper, Frances Waring, Ethel Coleridge, Edith Cuthbert’ (Bognor Regis Observer, 12 September 1917).
20 Sep 1917 Worthing Theatre, WorthingProfessional
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The Stage, 20 September 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 20 September at Worthing (3 days). ‘The prevalent spirit found amusing expression at the Theatre on Thursday night, on the occasion of the first of a series of four representations of that stirring spy play, The Man Who Stayed at Home. An incidental observation by one of the characters was to the effect that "The Kaiser's not here yet," and a most emphatic "Hear, hear!” from a member of the audience was greeted with hearty laughter. A succeeding remark the stage, “And you've got to catch him first before you make a prisoner of him!" was followed by a correspondingly assertive "Hear, hear!" and the laughter was renewed’ (Worthing Gazette, 26 September 1917). ‘It is unwise to class every robust man who is absent from the War zone as a shirker. Zealous young women presented Christopher Brent with the white feather, but the triumph was his when it was presently discovered that his special mission was to track some dangerous German spies. The Man Who Stayed at Home, seen here last week for the second time, is an agreeable compound of thrills and laughter, and the piece was well played by Mr. E. Platt Taylor's Company' (Worthing Gazette, 26 September 1917).
24 Sep 1917 Grand Theatre, PeterboroughProfessional
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The Stage, 20 September 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 24 September at Peterborough (3 days) and Stourbridge (3 days). ‘For three evenings this week we [the Grand, Peterborough] were favoured by a return visit of “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” presented by E. Taylor Platt. The company are exceedingly clever, and on the opening night the piece was again warmly received’ (The Stage, 27 September 1917).
27 Sep 1917 ?, StourbridgeProfessional
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The Stage, 27 September 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 27 September at Stourbridge (3 days).
1 Oct 1917 ?, OxfordProfessional
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The Stage, 27 September 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 1 October at Oxford (3 days) and Guildford (3 days).
4 Oct 1917 Theatre Royal, GuildfordProfessional
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The Stage, 4 October 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 4 October at Guildford (3 days). ‘[Next week on] Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings, and matinee Saturday, at 2.30, the Taylor Platt Company ... will present “The Man who Stayed at Home,” the sensational spy play, which is described as thrilling and amusing’ (Surrey Advertiser, 26 September 1917).
8 Oct 1917 Theatre Royal, CanterburyProfessional
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The Stage, 4 and 11 October 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 8 October at the Royal, Canterbury.
15 Oct 1917 Theatre Royal, ChathamProfessional
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The Stage, 11 and 18 October 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 15 October at the Royal, Chatham. The East Kent Gazette, 13 October 1917, advertised for the week beginning Monday 15 October The Man Who Stayed at Home at the Theatre Royal, Chatham.
22 Oct 1917 Opera House, BlackpoolProfessional
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The Stage, 18 and 25 October 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 22 October at the O.H., Blackpool.
29 Oct 1917 Opera House, SouthportProfessional
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The Stage, 25 October and 1 November 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 29 October at the O.H., Southport.
5 Nov 1917 Corporation Theatre, ChesterfieldProfessional
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The Stage, 1 November 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 5 November at the Corporation, Chesterfield (3 days) and the O.H., Buxton (3 days). ‘A three-act play, “The Man who Stayed at Home,” will provide the attraction at the Corporation Theatre for the first three nights next week’ (Derbyshire Courier, 3 November 1917).
8 Nov 1917 Opera House, BuxtonProfessional
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The Stage, 8 November 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 8 November at the O.H., Buxton (3 days).
12 Nov 1917 Royalty Theatre, ChesterProfessional
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The Stage, 8 and 15 November 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 12 November at the Royalty, Chester. ‘The attraction at the Royalty Theatre next week is the fine spy play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home” ... Before 1914 people smiled with scepticism at stories of espionage, and the wiles of adventuresses entrapping by their physical charms young officers possessing State documents. Now the novelist’s inventions are not altogether fiction. Amid all its ingenuities and dramatic surprises the play still contrives throughout to be a comedy. and in that respect is quite entertaining’ (Cheshire Observer, 10 November 1917). Reviewed in the Cheshire Observer, 17 November 1917, but the text is largely illegible in the copy in the British Newspaper Archive.
19 Nov 1917 Pavilion, Mile EndProfessional
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The Stage, 15 and 22 November 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 19 November at the Pavilion, Mile End.
26 Nov 1917 Theatre Royal, WindsorProfessional
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‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” is attracting good houses here [the Royal, Windsor]. Clifford Marle as Christopher Brent is extremely good all through the piece. J. Edward Pearce represents John Preston in a thoroughly characteristic manner; while Christine Cooper as Molly Preston is picturesque and artistic, doing justice to the part. Ethel Coleridge in the rôle of Fräulein Schroeder impersonates that character splendidly. Joan Stanley gives a clever representation of Miriam Leigh. Edith Cuthbert as Daphne Kidlington is good. T. Arthur Ellis in the part of Carl Sanderson portrays the character well, and Malcolm Cumming as Fritz is quite convincing. Hilda Francks portrays Mrs. Sanderson admirably, and Frances Waring is successful as Miss Myrtle. E. J. Bennett King as Percival Pennycuik is also well placed. The while is a delightful and vivacious performance, and is much applauded’ (The Stage, 29 November 1917). N.B.: The Stage, 22 and 29 November 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 26 November at the County, Kingston.
3 Dec 1917 Hippodrome, Richmond-upon-thamesProfessional
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The Stage, 29 November and 6 December 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Co.) as On Tour from 3 December at the Hippo., Richmond.
28 Jan 1918 Theatre Royal, WinchesterProfessional
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The Stage, 27 December 1917, advertised that E. Taylor Platt 's spring tour of The Man Who Stayed at Home would start on 28 January. The Era, 23 January 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On The Road from 28 January at the T.R., Winchester. Also The Stage, 31 January 1918.
4 Feb 1918 Hippodrome, CroydonProfessional
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‘Taylor Platt Co. in “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ was advertised in The Era, 30 January 1918, at the Croydon Hippodrome for the week commencing Monday 4 February. Also listed in The Stage, 31 January 1918. Advertised and previewed in the Norwood News, 1 February 1918.
11 Feb 1918 Empire, Camberwell, LondonProfessional
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‘E. Taylor Platt Co. in “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ was advertised in The Era, 6 February 1918, at the Camberwell Empire for the week commencing Monday 11 February.
18 Feb 1918 Royal County Theatre, ReadingProfessional
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Previewed in the Reading Observer, 16 February 1918. ‘That the spy play can continue to command the interest of a discriminating public is being emphasised this week at the Royal County Theatre, Reading, where the great Royalty Theatre success “The man who stayed at home” is making a very successful reappearance. As theatre-goers are aware, it is a clever play, and the company is an excellent one’ (Reading Mercury, 23 February 1918).
25 Feb 1918 Hippodrome, Putney, LondonProfessional
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The Stage, 21 and 28 February 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 25 February at the Hippo., Putney.
4 Mar 1918 Hippodrome, IlfordProfessional
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‘E. Taylor Platt Co. in “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ was advertised in The Era, 27 February 1918, at the Ilford Hippodrome for the week commencing Monday 4 March.
11 Mar 1918 Palace, WatfordProfessional
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The Stage, 7 and 14 March 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 11 March at the P., Watford.
18 Mar 1918 Theatre Royal, ColchesterProfessional
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The Stage, 14 and 21 March 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 18 March at the R., Colchester.
25 Mar 1918 Empire Theatre, IslingtonProfessional
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‘E. Taylor Platt Co. in “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ was advertised in The Era, 20 March 1918, at the Islington Empire for the week commencing Monday 25 March. Also listed in The Stage, 28 March 1918.
1 Apr 1918 Theatre Royal, LincolnProfessional
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‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home,” the first and still the best of the spy plays bearing on the present war, drew three full houses yesterday to the Theatre Royal, Lincoln, where it is to be staged twice nightly (at 7 and 9) during the week, with a matinee to-morrow at 2.30. Mr. E. Taylor Platt sends an excellent production, and if it was obvious last evening that numbers of those present had seen the play before and had established it as a favourite that did not prevent their relishing to the full the situations, thrilling and amusing in which it abounds. “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is really a wonderful blend of intensely dramatic and actually comic, and it would difficult to name another war play in which the ingredients mix to such effect. In the present company Mr. Leslie Neilson Clare is seen as Christopher Brent, whose apparent foppishness covers the shrewd, keen watchfulness of a master mind. With Miss Hilda Glynn as an ideal Mrs. Leigh, Mr. Clare scores full success, and mention should he made of Mr. J. Edward Pearce in the role of the irascible Preston, a part that he hits off to the most minute detail. The other characters are quite well handled, and the play is mounted with the greatest care to the realisation of the effects required. “The Man Who at Home” is bound to do a big week’s business on its return visit to Lincoln’. Lincolnshire Echo, 2 April 1918.
8 Apr 1918 Grand, PeterboroughProfessional
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The Era, 3 April 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt’s Co.) as On The Road from 8 April at the G., Peterboro’ (3 days) and the R., King’s Lynn (3 days).
11 Apr 1918 Theatre Royal, King's LynnProfessional
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The Era, 3 April 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Taylor Platt’s Co.) as On The Road from 8 April at the G., Peterboro’ (3 days) and the R., King’s Lynn (3 days).
15 Apr 1918 Theatre Royal, NorwichProfessional
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The Era, 10 April 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home in Next week’s Calls for Monday 15 April at the Theatre Royal, Norwich.
22 Apr 1918 Empire, GranthamProfessional
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Advertised as ‘E. Taylor Platt’s Masterpiece’ in the Grantham Journal, 20 April 1918. N.B. a card inserted by Leslie Neilson Clare in The Stage, 25 April 1918, gave his address as the T.R. [i.e. Theatre Royal], Grantham.
29 Apr 1918 Theatre Royal, ManchesterProfessional
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Advertised as produced by E. Taylor Platt and on its fifth visit to Manchester in the Manchester Evening News, 25 April 1918.
6 May 1918 Hippodrome, Golders Green, LondonProfessional
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The Stage, 2 and 9 May 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 6 May at the H., Golders Green.
13 May 1918 Grand Palace, Clapham Junction, LondonProfessional
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‘Mr. E. Taylor Platt’s excellent company, which for two years has been touring the Royalty Theatre success, “The Man Who Stayed At Home,” received a hearty welcome here [the Grand, Clapham Junction] on Monday evening. Mr Leslie Nielsen Clare gives a finished piece of acting in Mr. Dennis Eadie’s part of the nonchalant, but smart and cute, Kit Brent. Miss Peggy O’Hara is a charming Molly Preston, while the part of Mr. Preston is played with care by Mr. Edward J. Pearce. The crafty Admiralty official and German spy finds a clever exponent in Mr. Harry C. Robinson. Miss Frances Waring gives a telling impersonation of the Fraulein Schroder (sic – Schroeder). Other parts are all admirably enacted, and the play, which met with an enthusiastic reception, was finely staged’. The Era, 15 May 1918.
20 May 1918 Lyceum Theatre, SheffieldProfessional
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‘Next Week’s Amusements. A good list of holiday attractions is announced for the Sheffield theatres, music-balls, and picture palaces. The popular spy play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” should prove a capital draw at the Lyceum. It achieved much success at the Royalty Theatre. The play deals with events that are supposed to take place in a town on the East Coast in September, 1914. It is both amusing and thrilling, and its strength is shown by the fact that it is now in its fourth year of tour’ (Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 17 May 1918). ‘It is no wonder that “The Man who Stayed at Home” maintains its popularity, and that although it is this week paying its third visit in four years to the Lyceum Theatre, Sheffield, the audience last night was as large and appreciative as ever. It is a capital German spy play, full of plot and counter-plot, and enlivened with a great deal of humour. It is presented by an excellent company’ (Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 21 May 1918).
27 May 1918 Prince's Theatre, BristolProfessional
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‘Though “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is at the Prince’s Theatre this week for the third or fourth time, it is sure of drawing large audiences throughput the week, for the popularity of this thrilling and amusing spy play remains unabated, judging by its enthusiastic reception last evening' (Western Daily Press, 28 May 1918). ‘A return visit from E. Taylor Platt’s company with The Man Who Stayed at Home is attracting large audiences [at the Prince’s, Bristol]. The part of Christopher Brent is played with much success by Leslie Neilson Clare. J. Edward Pearce gives a capital portrayal of John Preston. Claude Edwards plays Fritz well. Peggy O’Hara is a charming Molly Preston . Agnes Lowson invests the character of Miss Myrtle with good comedy. Parts are also well acted by Harry C. Robinson, E. J. Bennett King, Hilda Francks, Hilda Glynn, and Frances Waring’. The Stage, 30 May 1918.
8 Jul 1918 Opera House, ScarboroughProfessional
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The Stage, 13 June 1918, advertised that Taylor Platt’s autumn tour of The Man Who Stayed at Home would start on 8 July. The Stage, 4 July 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 8 July at the O.H., Scarborough; the corresponding listing in The Stage, 11 July 1918, indicated that the stay was for three days.
11 Jul 1918 Opera House, HarrogateProfessional
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E. Taylor Platt advertised in The Era, 29 May 1917, for a theatre for The Man Who Stayed at Home for the week beginning 15 July to follow Harrogate. Previous visits to Harrogate had been to the Opera House.
15 Jul 1918 Opera House, SouthportProfessional
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The Stage, 11 and 18 July 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 15 July at the O.H., Southport.
22 Jul 1918 Theatre Royal, YorkProfessional
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The Stage, 18 July 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 22 July at the R., York.
29 Jul 1918 Opera House, NorthamptonProfessional
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‘E. Taylor Platt Co. in The Man Who Stayed at Home’ at the Opera House, Northampton was advertised in the Northampton Chronicle and Echo, 29 July 1918.
5 Aug 1918 County Theatre, ShrewsburyProfessional
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‘Taylor Platt Co. in “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ at the Royal County Theatre, Shrewsbury, was advertised in the Birmingham Daily Gazette, 6 August 1918. ‘At the Royal County Theatre [Shrewsbury] the Taylor Platt Company entertained two appreciative houses with an excellent production of “The Man Who Stayed at Home”‘ (Birmingham Daily Gazette, 6 August 1918).
12 Aug 1918 Coliseum, AberystwythProfessional
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The Stage, 8 August 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 12 August at the Col., Aberystwyth - but in practice only for the first three nights Monday-Wednesday, 12-14 August, as Taylor Platt’s company was performing at Llandrindod Wells for the rest of the week..
15 Aug 1918 Grand Pavilion, Llandrindod WellsProfessional
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The Stage, 15 August 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 15 August at the Pavilion, Llandrindod Wells (3 days).
19 Aug 1918 Theatre and Opera House, CheltenhamProfessional
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‘The Taylor Platt company … in The Man Who Stayed at Home’ was advertised for the following week at the Theatre and Opera House in the Cheltenham Looker-On, 17 August 1918 which also previewed the production. ‘When a play upon a third visit attracts and thoroughly grips so large a house as that which welcomed back the Taylor Platt company in “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” on Monday evening, it may be taken to be a thing of some qualities above the average … of all the many war plays that have yet been “presented” this, we think, is decidedly the best, combining as it does most piquant dramatic elements that are free from the “bluggy” melodramatic type of sensation, a clever spy story, and a genial strain of humour that is not dragged in as “relief,” but is part of the plot itself. The present cast, although several new names appear, show no falling off from the high quality of the play of the two prior visits. As it is a play in which the characters are mostly people of good society, “tone” is a quality that counts much, and in this respect there is not a jarring note' (Gloucestershire Echo, 20 August 1918). ‘There is a certain section of the playgoing public which steadfastly and consistently adopts the axiom that the alpha and omega of stage-plays is to amuse. The more conscientious theatre patron, however, has catholic tastes and recognises that the drama need not be confined to spasmodic revues and sprightly musical comedies, tickling as they are to the ear, and pleasant to the eye, but can also in due measure elevate and educate, without possessing any quality of dullness. The play of the week at the Theatre, The Man who Stayed at Home, is of the last-named description, for it is of a kind to open the eyes and intelligences of the general public, in a direct way that newspaper reading can never achieve, to what are some of the most dangerous features of the “alien peril” in our midst; and what is perhaps of even more enlightening account, gives a suggestive insight into the dangerous duties that fall to the lot of the consummately clever, but professionally obscure, members of the British Secret Service (Cheltenham Looker-On, 24 August 1918). ‘There are things one thanks providence he has not the chance of judging how they bear a second seeing. Not so “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” for one can confess to having sat it out a third time with as much pleasure as the first, for if the element of dramatic surprise was gone, one was under the circumstances more inclined to give attention to the quality of the characterisations and to the humour. The authors of the book (Lechmere Worrall and J. E. Harry Turner (sic – Terry)) make us realise what dramatic possibilities may be hidden in a company of seemingly commonplace people at a boarding-house in times that are spacious enough to give scope to their latent potentialities; and they have done so in a manner so far removed from the coarsely melodramatic; in fact, with such pretty and refined humour as well as dramatic power that on the whole “The Man Who Stayed at Home” can be ranked as the best war play we have had at the local Opera House' (Cheltenham Chronicle, 24 August 1918).
26 Aug 1918 Granville Theatre, Walham Green, LondonProfessional
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‘Taylor Platt’s Co., in “The Man Who Stayed at Home” was advertised in the West London Observer, 23 August 1918, at the Granville Theatre of Varieties, Walham Green, for the week beginning Monday 26 August, with the information that ‘the same artistes appear at both performances’. Also advertised in the Fulham Chronicle, 23 August 1918.
2 Sep 1918 Theatre Royal, CanterburyProfessional
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The Stage, 29 August and 5 September 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 2 September at the R., Canterbury.
9 Sep 1918 South Parade Pier, PortsmouthProfessional
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The Stage, 5 and 12 September 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 9 September at the S.P. Pier, Southsea. ‘On Monday and for the rest of the week the famous spy play, “The Man who Stayed at Home,” will be the special attraction’ at the South Parade Pier, Portsmouth (Hampshire Telegraph, 6 September 1918).
16 Sep 1918 West Pier Theatre, BrightonProfessional
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The Stage, 19 September 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 16 September at the W. Pier, Brighton. ‘The Man Who Stayed at Home is being staged by the Taylor Platt company’ at the West Pier, Brighton (The Stage, 19 September 1918).
23 Sep 1918 Pier Theatre, EastbourneProfessional
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The Stage, 19 and 26 September 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 23 September at the Pier, Eastbourne – but in practice only for the first three nights Monday-Wednesday, 23-25 September, as Taylor Platt’s company was performing at Worthing for the rest of the week.
26 Sep 1918 Worthing Theatre, WorthingProfessional
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The Worthing Gazette, Wednesday 25 September 1918, advertised E. Taylor Platt’s company in The Man Who Stayed at Home at the Worthing Theatre on Thursday-Saturday, 26-28 September (another play having been performed that week until Wednesday evening). The Worthing Gazette, Wednesday 2 October 1918, advertised E. Taylor Platt’s company in The Man Who Stayed at Home at the Worthing Theatre, the last performance being that evening (another play being performed for the rest of the week). The Era, 3 October 1918, reported that ‘the Taylor Platt company have been paying a return visit here [the Royal, Worthing] with The Man Who Stayed at Home with Luke Lawlor as Christopher Brent’; another company would be there in ‘the latter part of the week’.
3 Oct 1918 Kursaal Theatre, BognorProfessional
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The Bognor Regis Observer, Wednesday 2 October 1918, reported The Man Who Stayed at Home was due at the Kursaal Theatre on Thursday (the following day). Advertisements in the Bognor Regis Observer and the Chichester Observer, 2 October 1918, and the West Sussex Gazette, 3 October 1918, stated that the play would be performed for three nights with a Saturday matinée.
7 Oct 1918 Theatre Royal, GuildfordProfessional
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The Surrey Advertiser, 5 October 1918, advertised the Taylor Platt company in The Man Who Stayed at Home at the Theatre Royal, Guildford, for the week beginning Monday 7 October.
14 Oct 1918 Opera House, BurtonProfessional
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The Stage, 10 and 17 October 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 14 October at the O.H., Burton.
21 Oct 1918 Grand Theatre, MansfieldProfessional
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‘The play of the moment – “The Man who Stayed at Home” - the successful spy play from the Royalty Theatre, London, will be played at the Grand Theatre next week by E. Taylor Platt’s company … The strong cast includes: Luke Lawlor, J. Edward Pearce, Geo. Polson, C. Storey, Geo. Leslie, Peggy O’Hara, Christine Jensen, Francis (sic – Frances) Waring, Edith Cuthbert and Hilda Glynn’. Mansfield Reporter, 18 October 1918.
28 Oct 1918 Opera House, BlackpoolProfessional
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The Stage, 24 and 31 October 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 28 October at the O.H., Blackpool.
4 Nov 1918 Winter Gardens, New BrightonProfessional
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‘The bills of next week bring us back to a number of well and truly-laid plans, as, for example, … “[The] Man Who Stayed at Home,” at The Gardens, New Brighton’. Liverpool Echo, 1 November 1918.
11 Nov 1918 New Theatre, CreweProfessional
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The Crewe Chronicle, 9 November 1918, advertised the Taylor Platt company in The Man Who Stayed at Home at the New Theatre, Crewe, on Monday 11 November and during the week. Previewed in the Nantwich Guardian, 8 November 1918, and the Crewe Chronicle, 9 November 1918.
18 Nov 1918 Grand, LancasterProfessional
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The Stage, 14 and 21 November 1918, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 18 November at the G., Lancaster.
25 Nov 1918 Grand Theatre, LutonProfessional
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‘Local playgoers who have not yet seen the popular spy play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” will be missing a great treat if they do not take advantage of the return visit of this fine war-time play to the Grand Theatre this week … [this is] the greatest of all spy plays there has been presented during the war … For such a play an essential for success is a fine company, and the fact that the Taylor Platt company are again presenting it at the Grand Theatre will be a sufficient guarantee on that score to all who saw it on the last visit’. Luton Reporter, 26 November 1918.
2 Dec 1918 County Theatre, BedfordProfessional
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The Bedfordshire Times and Independent, 29 November 1918, advertised the Taylor Platt company in The Man Who Stayed at Home at the County Theatre from Monday 2 December twice nightly for six nights.
10 Feb 1919 Hippodrome, SheernessProfessional
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The Stage, 13 February 1919, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home as On Tour from 10 February at the H., Sheerness.
17 Feb 1919 Theatre Royal, LincolnProfessional
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Performed twice nightly with matinee Wednesday by the Taylor Platt company.
24 Feb 1919 Theatre Royal, PrestonProfessional
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Presented for the first time in Preston, in the fifth year of touring
24 Feb 1919 Empire Theatre, PrestonProfessional
13 Mar 1919 Theatre Royal, Leamington SpaProfessional
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Performed for three nights with matinee Saturday.
16 Mar 1919 Brixton Theatre, Brixton, LondonProfessional
17 Mar 1919 Theatre Royal, Bury, LancashireProfessional
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Performed for the first three nights of the week.
24 Mar 1919 Theatre Royal, BournemouthProfessional
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Performed for the week by the Taylor Platt Company.
31 Mar 1919 Grand Theatre, SouthamptonProfessional
14 Apr 1919 Worthing Theatre, WorthingProfessional
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Performed every night by the Taylor Platt Company.
21 Apr 1919 Palace Theatre, RamsgateProfessional
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Performed for the week by the Taylor Platt company.
21 Apr 1919 Palace Theatre, RamsgateProfessional
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Presented for the week for the holiday week.
28 Apr 1919 Theatre Royal, BarnstableProfessional
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Presented by the Taylor Platt company, Monday-Wednesday
19 May 1919 Westcliff Palace, SouthendProfessional
2 Jun 1919 Theatre Royal, YarmouthProfessional
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Presented by the Taylor Platt Company.
23 Jun 1919 King's Theatre, HammersmithProfessional
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Performed for the week.
7 Jul 1919 Borough Theatre, StratfordProfessional
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Performed for the week with matinee Wednesday.
29 Nov 1919 Cripplegate Institute, LondonAmateur
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Performed for one night by the Delphic Dramatic Society.
29 Apr 1920 Globe Theatre, PlymouthAmateur
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Amateur performance in aid of theatre funds.
24 May 1920 Isle of Wight Circuit, Isle of WightProfessional
7 Jun 1920 Palace Pier, HastingsProfessional
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Performed for the week
7 Jun 1920 Palace Pier, HastingsProfessional
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Performed for the week
14 Jun 1920 West Pier Theatre, BrightonProfessional
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Performed for the week
28 Jun 1920 Hippodrome, Golders Green, LondonProfessional
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Performed for the week by Gerald Alexander's Company.
21 Sep 1920 Pavilion Theatre, NewquayProfessional
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Performed Tuesday and Wednesday at 8.15pm. Thursday-Saturday 'Freedom of the Seas' was performed.
23 Sep 1920 Pavilion Theatre, PenzanceProfessional
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PErformed Thursday-Saturday at 8pm.
29 Nov 1920 Hippodrome, TodmordenAmateur
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Performed 29-30 November by Todmorden Amateur Players in aid of the Todmorden and District Nursing Association
10 Jan 1921 West Pier Theatre, BrightonProfessional
31 Jan 1921 Pavilion, TorquayProfessional
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Performed for the week.
9 Apr 1921 Palace Theatre, BurnleyAmateur
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Performed by the Burnley Amateur Comedy Company for one night only in aid of the 5th Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment.
30 Dec 1921 Capesthorne Hall, Chelford, CheshireAmateur
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Given by amateurs in the private theatre of Capesthorne Hall residence of General Bromley-Davenport, who took the chief role.
27 May 1922 King's Theatre, OswestryAmateur
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Performed on 27, 28 and 29 May for the benefit of the Shropshire Orthopaedic Hospital by Oswestry A.C.D
18 Dec 1922 Victoria Theatre, DundeeProfessional
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Performed for the week
22 Jan 1923 Canterbury Theatre, CanterburyAmateur
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Performed by the Canterbury Players in aid of the Kent and Canterbury Hospital for the week with matinees Thursday and Saturday.
5 Feb 1923 Queen's Theatre, DundeeProfessional
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Performed for the week
21 May 1923 Hippodrome, BirkenheadProfessional
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Performed Whit Monday,
25 Aug 1923 Opera House, CoventryProfessional
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Performed Monday, Tuesday and Saturday evenings.
15 Oct 1923 Ambassadors, SouthendProfessional
1 Sep 1924 Repertory Theatre, PlymouthProfessional
20 Oct 1924 Theatre Royal, Leamington SpaProfessional
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One night only. Performed by the Raynor Repertoire Company, headed by Ennis Lawson.
1 Dec 1924 Queen's Theatre, DundeeProfessional
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Performed for the week by Herbert Mansfield and Repertory Company
14 Apr 1925 New Theatre, CreweProfessional
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Performed Tuesday and Wednesday by the Raynor Repertory company.
10 Aug 1925 Coliseum, ShorehamProfessional
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Performed by Herbert Mansfield's company including Jayne Grey.
28 Sep 1925 Opera House, CoventryProfessional
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Performed by the Raynor Repertory Company for one night only.
18 Nov 1925 Good Templar Hall, Broughty FerryAmateur
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Performed by the Barnhill Dramatic Society
10 Dec 1925 Memorial Theatre, Stratford-on-AvonAmateur
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Performed by the Stratford Amateur Players on 10, 11 and 12 December.
13 Mar 1926 Moseley and Balsall Heath Institute, BirminghamAmateur
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Presented by the member of Camp Hill Old Edwardians Dramatic Society for one night.
15 Apr 1926 Lecture Hall, LittlehamptonAmateur
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Presented by the Littlehampton Amateur Dramatic Society on Thursday and Friday (15, 16 April)
16 Aug 1926 Opera House, NorthamptonProfessional
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Performed for the week by the Elephant and Castle Repertory Company.
19 Nov 1926 King George's Hall, LondonAmateur
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Performed by United Dairies D.S. on 19 and 20 November.
29 Nov 1926 Hippodrome, RotherhamProfessional
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Performed Monday-Wednesday by the Veneer Repertory Company.
29 Nov 1926 Hippodrome, RotherhamProfessional
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Performed Monday-Wednesday by the Veneer Repertory Company.
13 Dec 1926 Regent Theatre, LondonProfessional
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Performed for the week.
6 Jun 1927 Hippodrome, GloucesterProfessional
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Performed for the week by the Denville Players
11 Jul 1927 Her Majesty's Theatre, CarlisleProfessional
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Performed for the week. 'The play proves to have so much vitality as to suggest that war dramas have been too hastily placed on the shelf' (The Stage, 14 July 1927)
19 Sep 1927 Playhouse, BroadstairsProfessional
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Performed for the week.
26 Sep 1927 Hippodrome, CannockProfessional
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Performed for the week twice nightly with cast including Julian Courtville.
17 Nov 1927 St Oswald's Hall, SheffieldAmateur
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Performed by the Howlden Players, Nov 17-19 included.
4 Feb 1928 Town Hall, Lynton, North DevonAmateur
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Presented by the Lyn Amateur Dramatic Society around 4 February 1928.
13 Feb 1928 Prince of Wales Theatre, RugbyAmateur
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Presente by the Temple Players on 13-18 February.
22 Feb 1928 Pier Theatre, Herne BayAmateur
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Performed for four nights (22-25 February) by the Herne Bay Bohemians Operatic and Dramatic Society.
14 May 1928 West Cliff Concert Hall, RamsgateProfessional
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Performed Monday-Thursdayby the Grant Anderson Repertory Company.
14 May 1928 West Cliff Concert Hall, RamsgateProfessional
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Performed Monday-Thursday by the Grant Anderson Repertory Company.
1 Oct 1928 Pavilion Theatre, PerthProfessional
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Performed by the Herbert Mansfield Company.
18 Oct 1928 Regent Theatre, BarnstableProfessional
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Performed for three nights from Thursday 18 October.
5 Nov 1928 Manor theatre, ExmouthProfessional
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Presented for three nights by T. Adrian Heathcote Productions.
12 Nov 1928 Theatre Royal, WorthingProfessional
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Performed by the Imperial Players for three nights, Monday-Wednesday.
24 Dec 1928 Leas Pavilion, FolkestoneProfessional
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Performed on Christmas Eve, Boxing Day and the rest of the week twice a day.
15 Apr 1929 Alexandra Theatre, BirminghamProfessional
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Performed for the week by Leon Salberg and his 1929 Repertory Company including Bruce Belfrage and Faith Liddle.
29 May 1929 Grand Theatre, DerbyProfessional
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Performed for the week twice nightly.
16 Dec 1929 Her Majesty's Theatre, WalsallAmateur
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Performed Monday and Tuesday in aid of the funds of the Victoria Nursing Institution. Produced by Stanley Eglington.
30 Oct 1939 Brixton Theatre, Brixton, LondonProfessional
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‘Some might be inclined to think that Lechmere Worral [sic] and J. E. Harold’s [sic] old-fashioned spy play, “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” would be a sound attraction for the Brixton Repertory's 144th production, considering the present political situation, yet a good house appeared deeply interested in the play on Monday. It is well staged and produced by Colin Gordon, with settings designed and executed by Jack Drayton. Arnold Bell has a light comedy part, which he obviously enjoys as Christopher Brent, and Diana King gives a sympathetic and understanding portrayal of Mollie. The pompous J. P., John Preston, is admirably interpreted by Noel Carey, and Richard Humphrey is effective as Percival. James Page and Peter Hoar are both sufficiently sinister. Jean Stephenson is seen to advantage as Miriam Leigh. Joan Mathison contributes a notable and. amusing study of a chattering spinster, and June Melville completes the cast in her own capable way’. The Stage, 2 November 1939
31 Jan 1972 Thorndike Theatre (Leatherhead), LeatherheadProfessional
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‘Twenty-one years of theatre in Leatherhead is being celebrated at the Thorndike with a revival of the famous 1914 play “The Man Who Stayed at Home” by Lechmere Worrall and J. E. Harold Terry; the first professional production since Jersey in 1950 and Bolton in 1943. Directed by Jordan Lawrence - who, with Michael Marriott and Hazel Vincent Wallace formed the original triad who opened the first small theatre in the town in January 1951 - this presentation is perfectly in period and comes across as a truthful representation of the unsophisticatedness of even the world of espionage nearly 60 years ago. The audience is permitted a few giggles at the idea of anyone falling about at the sight of a microphone and a concealed “Marconi set” but it never gets out of hand. Under the director’s skilful hand this very good play holds together in its own right and is so absorbing that, on the night I was there, one small boy in the audience yelled an urgent “look out!” when the villain pulled a gun on the hero. David Stoll, best known as a farce actor, proves his strong dramatic ability as the able-bodied Christopher Brent who would neither enlist to fight for his country nor give reason for not doing so and Brian Spink is excellent as the Admiralty official who is really a German spy, while Carmen Silvera is at her best as his equally involved but not nearly so black-hearted mother. Villainy is also well represented by Margaret Diamond as one of their confederates while the side of the goodies is strongly upheld by Sonia Graham as chief assistant counter-spy, Carole Mowlam as Brent’s bewildered but loyal fiancee, Leon Sinden as her blimpish father, Barbara Bolton as a startled spinster and Ian Ogilvy as a keen young soldier who, while impressing the enemy as effete and foolish, proves equal to an emergency when it comes. Last performance February 12’.