Great War Theatre

Performances at this Theatre

DateScriptType
N/A Lady Emma's RomanceUnknown
12 Oct 1914 To Arms!Professional
5 Apr 1915 The Panorama of YouthUnknown
19 Jul 1915 SearchlightsProfessional
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‘Local playgoers will welcome the announcement that the management of the Theatre Royal have secured as their next week’s attraction, Messrs. Alick Chumley and A. Russell-Davis’ company, in Mr. H. B. Irving’s great success from the Savoy Theatre – “Searchlights.” The author, Mr. Horace Annesley Vachell, who has long been acknowledged as one of our most successful English playwrights, has excelled himself in “Searchlights,” and provided Mr. Irving with one of the best parts in his career. “Searchlights” is not a war play, although it touches on it - it would be well nigh impossible to write a modern play that did not ... The scenery and effects will be a reproduction of those used at the Savoy Theatre’ (Bournemouth Gazette, 17 July 1915). ‘“Searchlights” is clever - exceedingly clever as one may rightly expect from H. A. Vachell. But its cleverness lies in the fact that the author has in a wonderful manner anticipated, as it were, the changes that would be wrought in the average individual by this great world war. The title of the play may not suggest itself until the middle of the second act. Then suddenly the limelight appears to fall fully on everyone, penetrating places and problems, and revealing things which have hitherto remained unsolved to the cleverest man' (Bournemouth Graphic, 23 July 1915). '... we are left to adumbrate that the refining fires of the war in which Harry has been invalided will better everybody, and that the “Searchlights” will probe down into the deepest fastnesses of the hearts of men and women rendering them more intelligible to their fellows and thus making for that perfect understanding that means happiness ... one feels grateful to the play and wishes it length of days' (Bournemouth Guardian, 24 July 1915).
26 Jul 1915 The Man Who Stayed At HomeProfessional
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‘All roads lead to the great Royalty Theatre spy play this week, and crowded and enthusiastic audiences are appearing at the Theatre Royal each evening to witness “The Man Who Stayed at Home,” and follow every movement of “ The Man Who Had to Stay at Home.” After seeing this clever play one ceases to wonder why it proved such a sensational success in town, and why the subject is on the lips of every patriot in the provinces. Situations bright, amusing, and thrilling follow each other in quick succession, and the excitement is maintained by a series of dramatic surprises which at times raise pitite and stallholder to an unusual pitch of enthusiasm ... The ingenious devices and effects introduced form no small features that assist in keeping the rivetted attention of the audience throughout. There is not a single member of Messrs. Vedrenne and Eadie’s company who does not enter into his or her part with every touch of realism'. Bournemouth Graphic, 30 July 1915.
27 Jan 1916 ArmageddonProfessional
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Performed on select night(s) as part of the repertory. The company had begun the tour two weeks earlier but this was the first time that Armageddon was given as part of the repertory.
27 Mar 1916 The Man Who Stayed At HomeProfessional
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The Bournemouth Graphic, 17 March 1916, advertised ‘The Enormously Successful Spy-play The Man Who Stayed at Home’ at the Theatre Royal for the week beginning Monday 27 March. Previewed in the Bournemouth Graphic, 24 March 1916, which listed the actors [members of E. Taylor Platt's touring company] in this 'capital play with its breezy humours, its briskness and its thrills'. ‘“The Man Who Stayed at Home” is a captivating play full of laughter and thrills’ (Bournemouth Graphic, 31 March 1916).
4 Sep 1916 A Kiss For CinderellaProfessional
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The Bournemouth Graphic, 25 August 1916, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Theatre Royal, Bournemouth on Monday 4 September for six nights and two matinees. The Bournemouth Graphic, 8 September 1916, and the Bournemouth Guardian, 9 September 1916, published reviews of the production. The latter said, ‘Most war plays are mere frightfulness, but inasmuch as it is a war play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” notwithstanding its circumscriptions, sets a standard that is, alas! hardly likely to be approached. It exhales as wholesome and sweet a spirit as a wild flower’.
20 Nov 1916 The Bing Boys Are HereProfessional
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'‘“The Bing Boys are Here” promises to be a success at the Theatre Royal next week quite beyond the ordinary. Already the demand for seats is great. Certainly the “Bing Boys” took the fancy of London, and with Mr. George Robey and Mr. Alfred Lester in the principal male parts, and Miss Violet Loraine as “leading lady,” it was not to be wondered at. And there is this special quality about the “Bing Boys” - it provides the chief artistes with every possible chance. Individual eccentricities are allowed full play, so that given the right people in the right parts it can scarcely fail with the average audience ... Some of the songs are particularly attractive, notably the duet between “Emma” and “Lucifer,” “If you were the only Boy in the World,” and the Four Wards (glee singers) are distinctly good, and deservedly popular. The piece is brightly mounted and the dresses are charming’. Bournemouth Graphic, 17 November 1916.
14 May 1917 The Man Who Stayed At HomeProfessional
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The Era, 9 and 16 May 1917, listed The Man Who Stayed at Home (Red Company) as On The Road from 14 May at the Royal, Bournemouth. Also The Stage, 10 and 17 May 1917. ‘Once again the thrilling yet amusing spy play entitled “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is entertaining the patriotic patrons of the Theatre Royal ... This is, we believe, the third visit of the play to Bournemouth, yet its fascination has the same grip upon the audience as of yore ... “The Man Who Stayed at Home” is certainly a play of the times, and the more often one witnesses it, the greater is the pleasure derived’ (Bournemouth Graphic, 18 May 1917). ‘This capital play is paying its third visit to Bournemouth, and at the first performance on Monday night at the Theatre Royal was received, as on the two previous visits, with much enthusiasm ... The clever combination of comedy, drama, character-drawing, and general observation still draws crowded houses in all parts of the provinces, and it will surely continue to do so until the great day when the terrors of Prussianism are for ever removed and a satisfactory peace declared … The play is full of excitement and topical interest, and the authors are to be again congratulated upon their successful production' (Bournemouth Guardian, 19 May 1917).
3 Sep 1917 Salad DaysUnknown
29 Oct 1917 A Kiss For CinderellaProfessional
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The Bournemouth Graphic, 26 October 1917, announced, ‘On Monday next, a return visit of J. M. Barrie’s fantasy, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” is announced at the Theatre Royal. The Bournemouth Graphic, 26 October 1917, published a preview of the production. The Bournemouth Graphic, 2 November 1917, published a review of the production: ‘As with all of Barrie’s famous works, there is a charming mixture of fairy story and realism with this dainty production, and in order to be thoroughly up-to-date the author has blended with it many light touches of the war, in which humour, pathos and charm each play their respective parts’.
10 Dec 1917 Inside the LinesProfessional
26 Dec 1917 Robinson CrusoeUnknown
18 Jan 1918 London Pride: A Film Without A FlickerProfessional
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'A war play without the horrors of war', the play ran for a week. It was considered a 'great success' at Wyndham's. Ellis Holland plays Cuthbert Tunks, VC and Laura Lydia plays Cherry Walters. Tom Brown directed the orchestra. The co-authors (Gladys Unger and Neil Lyons) are deemed to have 'touched the public pulse exactly'.
1 Aug 1918 The Luck Of The NavyProfessional
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This was a trial run before the London run.
9 Dec 1918 Peace Time Prophecies or Stories Gone WrongProfessional
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Bubbly, ‘a rare musical treat’, is previewed and advertised in the Bournemouth Graphic, Friday 6 December 1918, as coming to the Theatre Royal for six nights from Monday 9 December with a Saturday matinee. ‘“Bubbly” is one great bubble of fun at the Theatre Royal this week - indeed, it is a bubble which, when bursting, scatters everything that is merry and bright, and in every direction. Mr. Ralph Haslam’s company is excellent in every way, and each member seems determined to make the merriment more riotous and more speedy as the play proceeds ... An important comedian is Mr. Edmund Russell, truly a gentleman of many parts. Mr. Russell portrays many different characters ranging from a prehistoric hubby to a modern “Old Bill,” and each time he makes an appearance is the signal for laughter loud and unrestrained’. Bournemouth Graphic, 13 December 1918. Also reviewed in the Bournemouth Guardian, 14 December 1918.
24 Mar 1919 The Man Who Stayed At HomeProfessional
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Performed for the week by the Taylor Platt Company.
14 Apr 1919 The Luck Of The NavyProfessional
16 Jun 1919 Tails UpProfessional
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Previewed in the Bournemouth Graphic, Friday 13 June 1919. ‘There is no lack of fun, frivolity, beauty and splendour at the Theatre Royal this week. “Tails Up,” fresh from its triumphs at the Comedy Theatre, is attracting crowded houses nightly. A musical extravaganza on which brains and money appear to have been bestowed with rare generosity, “Tails Up” proves a really bang up-to-date production, full of originality, sparkling wit, and a running satire that astounds one by its cleverness and ingenuity. The cast includes Claire Ruane, Phyllis Beadon, Hilda Simpson and Marie Brian, a quartette of talented ladies who, in drama or song or humour, are all that could be desired. The principal comedians are Jack Leopold, Phil Golding, William Nixon, Bert Monks and Edwin Adeler, the latter gentleman being highly successful in “The Curious Tale of the Intellectual Sergeant-Major,” “The Strange Tale of the Historical Lecture,” and “The Strange Tale of the Butler who had seen better days.” One of the most charming scenes is the finale, introducing the period 1815. The music is chiefly by Philip Braham and the lyrics by several well-known composers’ (Bournemouth Graphic, 20 June 1919). Also reviewed in the Bournemouth Guardian, 21 June 1919.
22 Sep 1919 Seven Days LeaveProfessional
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Performed for six nights with matinee Saturday at 2.
8 Dec 1919 The Freedom of the SeasProfessional
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Dagnall's company performed for the week.
26 Apr 1920 The Luck Of The NavyProfessional
26 Apr 1920 The Luck Of The NavyProfessional
4 Dec 1922 The Burgomaster Of StilemondProfessional
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Performed as part of the week's programme.
4 Dec 1922 The Burgomaster Of StilemondProfessional
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Performed for one night as part of a week's repertoire by the company.
13 Apr 1925 The Burgomaster Of StilemondProfessional
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Performed for one night as part of a week's repertoire by the company.