Great War Theatre

Examiner of Plays' Summary:

A dainty, charming childish play, whimsical like in sentiment and humour, and ‘Barrie’ all over. Its heroine is the quaint cockney slavery of a middle aged artist, whom she mothers in her Wendy-like way, and who’s who it is to dub her Cinderella. The nickname fires the imagination the girl into the belief - which she expresses in the language of the penny novelette - which she, too, is to drive in a pumpkin coach to a Palace, to carry all before her with her glass slippers, and to marry a prince. In odd contrast to her is introduced as hero a Gilbertian policeman, called in by the artist to solve his doubts as to the home and home-life of his mysterious little day-servant. The constable follows Jane, otherwise Cinderella, to her humble abode, where of course he finds her playing guide philosopher and friend to all sorts of queer protégés, grown-ups as well as children. In his turn the policeman plays good angel to her, and helps her to realise her dream, which is illustrated for us in the second act as a fairy-tale translated into the language and fancy of the servants’ hall. The third act strikes an original if rather forced note of pathos by making Cinderella a patient in a hospital for waifs and wounded soldiers, run by the term doctor-sister of the whimsical painter. To this singular establishment the imaginative slavery, cured of her fancy and recovering from the pulmonary disease threatened by her privations, is followed by her faithful knight of the truncheon, and is betrothed to him after an exquisitely doll and tender courtship. Full of conceits, shred, touching, and sometimes a trifle foolish; but always pure and wholesome. Recommended for licence, Ernest A. Bendall.

Researcher's Summary:

The text of the play is available online at https://classic-literature.co.uk/j-m-barrie-a-kiss-for-cinderella-play; at https://archive.org/details/AKissForCinderella_JMBarrie/page/n1; and at https://www.fadedpage.com/showbook.php?pid=20130532. An audiobook of the play, published on 22 February 2017, is available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QXIUOrQd4k. The play’s original run at Wyndham’s Theatre, London, from 16 March to 29 July 1916 was for 156 performances (W. A. Darlington, ‘J. M. Barrie’, London and Glasgow 1938, p. 121), after which the provincial and suburban rights in the play were secured by Miss Emma and Mr. Percy Hutchison (The Stage, 1 June 1916; The Era, 7 June 1916) who took the play on tour between London revivals. In due course the play proved popular with local amateur groups and schools. The original production had reunited Hilda Trevelyan and Gerald du Maurier who had created the roles of Wendy and Captain Hook in Barrie’s Peter Pan. Indeed, parallels were noted between the mothering instincts of Wendy and Barrie’s new Cinderella character (actually ‘Miss Thing’). The events of the play are set in the then present time and it was recognised as having several elements that made it a ‘war play’: Mr. Bodie puts up boards to preserve blackout conditions and when Miss Thing removes them, to make beds for some babies she is taking care of, a policeman suspects her of being a German spy; one of the babies who is English sings Ye Mariners of England and a patriotic French baby responds with La Marseillaise; Miss Thing performs various other charitable works as a way of ‘doing her bit’ for the war effort; and she recovers from a bout of pneumonia in a convalescent home for wounded soldiers. Several reviewers remarked on those aspects of the play. The Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 17 March 1916, headed its review ‘Cinderella As A War Heroine’. The Times, 17 March 1916, noted, ‘Much Barrie pleasant sentiment about the war, our Tommies and nurses, the present breaking-down of class barriers, and so forth helped the last Act along’. The Globe, 17 March 1916, commented, ‘There is not a war speech in the play, which is full of wisdom about the war’. The Yorkshire Evening Post, 18 March 1916, called the play ‘a true tale of England in time of war’. The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, 25 March 1916, commented, ‘we may thank Heaven and Barrie for a new way of talking about war on the stage’. The Eastbourne Gazette, 30 August 1916, praised Will Smith’s performance as Danny, ‘the stolid-looking “boy in blue” who was the typical wounded Tommy to the life, solid and impressive, and yet bubbling over with that irresistible humour which is the priceless asset of the British soldier wherever he goes’. The Bournemouth Guardian, 9 September 1916, said, ‘Most war plays are mere frightfulness, but inasmuch as it is a war play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” notwithstanding its circumscriptions, sets a standard that is, alas! hardly likely to be approached. It exhales as wholesome and sweet a spirit as a wild flower’. The Newcastle Daily Chronicle, 19 September 1916, wrote, ‘The hospital scene is Barrie’s topical contribution to the war, for we are brought hack to real life with the sufferings of the soldiers, with their uncomplaining good humour, with the somewhat strict lady doctor, and with the titled young lady who sinks her identity in the guise of a probationer’. Nevertheless, ‘Allusions to the war are never allowed to overshadow the atmosphere of fairyland which pervades the play’ (The Scotsman, 26 September 1916). Similarly the Hull Daily Mail, 25 September 1917, called the play ‘a whimsical, weird, unearthly thing, although it is connected with the war’. Even several years after the war the play’s connection with it was not overlooked: ‘We shall be surprised if this war-period play does not become one of London’s annual Christmas shows’ (Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, 22 December 1924); ‘As a nation, we seem to have almost forgotten the great lesson of service and sacrifice taught us by the war, and it is well that this play should be revived, for here Barrie is both poet and teacher’ (Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 22 December 1924). ‘In many of the … characters can be traced quaintly satirical suggestions of the times when the play was produced - a time when England was war-stricken; when people were heavily charged with anxieties, full of new and hitherto unknown terrors; existing in darkened houses in fear of Zeppelins and the daily bulletins of the terrors of war. These, however, are treated in a vein of pleasing humour such as only Barrie can give expression to’ (Derby Daily Telegraph, 15 December 1926). However, The Scotsman, 22 December 1924, commented that the play ‘is already out of date for those who can remember the war, and huge slices of it must be altogether incomprehensible to the rising generation … the war atmosphere of the setting [is] impermanent and outworn’. Some years later – ironically less than two years before the outbreak of the Second World War - a revival of the play at the Phoenix Theatre, London, prompted the author of a review in the Birmingham Daily Gazette, 24 December 1937, to think that ‘references to the air raids which threatened London at the time of the play’s first production’ threatened to make the play a dated piece. Reviewing the same production, the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, 28 December 1937, felt that the play’s ‘references to wounded men and refugees may be obscure to a generation now growing up who already are asking “What did grandfather do in the Great War?”; and The Era, 30 December 1937, also noted that the play ‘may be a little dated in its war-time setting’. The coming of the Second World War restored the play’s immediate relevance. The Perthshire Advertiser, 19 December 1942, thought that ‘This play of Barrie’s, though written during the last war, can never date, and in fact to-day it seems more applicable than ever’. The various moralising tendencies that reviewers detected in the play were not enough to secure performances the exemption from entertainment tax that was granted in 1944 to plays that the Inland Revenue considered ‘partly educational’ – unlike the exemptions given to Barrie’s Dear Brutus and Brandon Thomas’ Charley’s Aunt (The Stage, 15 June 1944). A silent film of the play was made in America in 1925 starring Betty Bronson and Tom Moore. A British television production of the play, starring Jeannie Carson, was broadcast on Christmas Day 1959 (The Times, 24 December 1959). There is information about American productions of A Kiss for Cinderella in blogs by Rhoda-Gale Pollack at http://www.ww1plays.com/2017/03/barries-kiss-for-cinderella.html (22 March 2017) and http://www.ww1plays.com/search?updated-max=2017-04-19T15:59:00-04:00&max-results=7&start=36&by-date=false (6 April 2017).

Licensed On: 7 Mar 1916

License Number: 110

Author(s):

Genre(s):

British Library Reference: LCP1916/5

British Library Classmark: Add MS 66126 J

Performances

DateTheatreType
16 Mar 1916 Wyndham's Theatre, LondonUnknown Licensed Performance
16 Mar 1916 Wyndham's Theatre, LondonProfessional
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'‘Now we know why so careful a secrecy was maintained in regard to “A Kiss for Cinderella” from J. M. Barrie. It is hard to think what could have been said to convey to the public an idea of the play. And the task of the critic, having witnessed the production at Wyndham’s Theatre, is no less difficult. Let this be put record at the outset: “A Kiss for Cinderella” is far and away the most distinguished and charming work we have had from Sir James Barrio for years. We will forgive and forget the dull and pompous “Der Tag,” the ultra-fantastic music-hall sketches, and pot-boiling one-act plays that would have escaped adulation, even serious consideration, but for the name of their author. In “A Kiss for Cinderella” are all the characteristic qualities of the author. But the humour is restrained and mostly intelligible, the insight to character, especially of women and children, keen and penetrating, the portraiture vivid and sympathetic ... There is not a war speech in the play, which is full of wisdom about the war. As, indeed, it is full of wisdom, touched with benevolence, about many things’. The Globe, 17 March 1916. ‘Did Sir James Barrie mean anything profoundly practical in the beautiful little cluster of fancies that he made into last night’s beautiful little play at Wyndham’s? Better not worry. It is a thoroughly Barrie play, about a thoroughly Barrie Cinderella who was something of Wendy as well, and absolutely did have a little German baby - an “orpheling” - among her adopted family! Naturally a German baby nowadays puts a first-night audience on the alert. But it would just spoil everything if any one pretended that Sir James ever meant to come nearer this terrible old earth of ours at all than this realm of Barrie-land which is so scattered about in hearts and fancies and streets and shops and newspapers and far-off seas and close-at-home nurseries that no one can say that it is anywhere'. Pall Mall Gazette, 17 March 1916. ‘Much Barrie pleasant sentiment about the war, our Tommies and nurses, the present breaking-down of class barriers, and so forth helped the last Act along’. The Times, 17 March 1916. ‘It is not the in power of precis and paraphrase, says a critic, to convey the rarer qualities of Sir James Barrie’s new play, “A Kiss for Cinderella.” “Where is fancy bred, or in the heart or in the head?” Both head and heart have their share in this play, which Sir James calls “a fancy.” ... Half the play is tender fun and quaint pathos, true for any year in the world’s history. Another part is keenly, insistently of the moment, poignant just because it is a true tale of England in time of war'. Yorkshire Evening Post, 18 March 1916. ‘Fun and Fantasy at Wyndham’s. Sir James Barrie in the theatre is law unto himself. No one would dare, as indeed one could do, what he dares and does. “A Kiss for Cinderella” is at once the most charming and elusive, the most perplexing and daring thing on the contemporary stage; if anyone but Barrie had written it failure - or something like it - would have peeped out from every other line, but as it is Barrie, while we should not like to predict for this “fancy in three acts” a brilliant success we should not be at all surprised if it proved the play of the season'. The People, 19 March 1916. '‘In the course of time our dictionaries will embrace the word “Barrie,” “meaning thereby,” as lawyers say, a whimsical idea, partly comic, partly pathetic, in unstable proportions varying with the mood of the spectator or auditor. “A Kiss for Cinderella” is full of “Barries” - a few indifferent, like those in “Rosy Rapture,” but mostly delightful. What’s it all about? Who knows? Who cares? Let us say about Cinderella plus Wendy plus Little Mary plus Hilda Trevelyan ... Sometimes, perhaps, we were rather puzzled than pleased; still, these times were comparatively rare. As a rule, it was laughter; but laughter generally with a very thin partition between it and the tears department'. The Sketch, 22 March 1916. 'there is much to rejoice the heart in “A Kiss for Cinderella.” It is quaint and funny, and dear and tender and wistful in the way in which only Barrie can be all these things. It may not be the best Barrie, but it is the Barrie that touches the heart and disarms criticism. It is full of sentiment, it is full of humour, it defies analysis, and it is wholly charming.there is much to rejoice the heart in “A Kiss for Cinderella.” It is quaint and funny, and dear and tender and wistful in the way in which only Barrie can be all these things. It may not be the best Barrie, but it is the Barrie that touches the heart and disarms criticism. It is full of sentiment, it is full of humour, it defies analysis, and it is wholly charming ... It is fairly safe to prophesy that “A Kiss for Cinderella” is going to be one of Sir James Barrie’s most emphatic successes’. The Era, 22 March 1916. 'J. M. Barrie has filled out his main plot with so many small details (some of them otiose and even a trifle childish and tedious) and with excursions into such a number of side issues that the bare enumeration of them, let alone their exhaustive discussion, would occupy more space than can be spared in these “War-Times,” a phrase to which too frequent reference is made in the course of what is largely a topical and hence necessarily ephemeral, rather than logically coherent and homogeneous, piece of work ... “A Kiss for Cinderella” is pretty sure to win a fitting measure of success at Wyndham’s during this spring and summer’. The Stage, 23 March 1916. ‘There is a Scots epithet called “auld farrant.” It means something more than old-fashioned, and more or less implies carrying on into mature years the wonderments of childhood. It also involves what used in the seventeenth century to be called “conceits.” The epithet connotes the quality of Sir J. M. Barrie better than any other. He has the wonderful power of being able to write down what as a child he dreamed and desired - not that he need have dreamed and desired more than other children, but these impressions fade with most of us into the light of common day'. The Graphic, 25 March 1916. ‘The wise playgoer, when he gets a new Barrie play, does not examine it critically and compare it with others from the same hand, wondering whether it does not lack this or that feature supplied before. It is enough for him that this magician has dipped into his lucky-bag again, which is as much as to say that he has given us his own inimitable mixture of sentiment and whimsy, of thoughtfulness and fun, of what is touching and natural, and what is Puck-like and weird. That is the spirit in which you should accept “A Kiss for Cinderella.” No one else but its author would have written, no one else would have succeeded with such a mélange. He might have done it a little better - made that third act something less like an after-thought and an excrescence. But none the less it is pure Barrie, and much of it the best Barrie ... itis not all dream we get, for this Barrie play is by way of being a war-play: and so not only does this little studio slavey do her bit and rouse a policeman’s suspicions by running a little crêche of her own, she achieves one of her great wishes, which is to nurse the wounded'. Illustrated London News, 25 March 1916. '‘A little maid-of-all work who wins Prince Charming in her dreams and who mates with a stolid policeman in the end. A bit of everything in the best Barrie vein; and the various ingredients - pantomime, melodrama, and comedy - mixed by a master hand. A fairy tale for grown-ups. A delicious combination of fantasy and realism. Quaint concerts, whimsical ideas, tender pathos, evasive, and yet entirely human. In dramatic form, lacking continuity and often puzzling. Characteristics of an author and poet that abounds in surprises, and holds the secret of enduing his characters with a lovable interest all their own. With its lights and shades, such was the play that delighted and amused us at Wyndham’s last Thursday night'. Sporting Times, 25 March 1916. '‘This must be almost, if not quite, the best play that Sir James Barrie has written. It is a delightful “Fancy” about a Cinderella who is not really a Cinderella, and who begins by yearning for a Fairy Prince, and ends by falling in love with a common or garden policeman. It is not the kind of play that anyone is expected to follow laboriously. You sit and, as it were, absorb it. It grows on you as it proceeds. Apparently without sequence or purpose at the commencement, it develops into a well-ordered story, a perfect tale from dreamland, the humour of which is so delicately poised that here and there you find yourself inevitably hovering between the smile and the tear ... In “Cinderella’s” nursery there are four little girls. One is English, another French, another Belgian, and another – alien! Just that. In this terrible war we had been getting used to the rather un-British way of thinking that the best kind of alien, is a dead alien; and here we have the gentle reminder that to us a helpless child has no nationality, and no particular status except its divine right to the “cup of cold water”'. The Bystander, 29 March 1916. '‘If you were to ask me what I really thought of Barrie’s new fantasy, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” which Mr. Curzon and Mr. du Maurier produced, the other day at Wyndham’s, I should say that it was Barrie at his - second best. It is very charming, very dainty, very - if I may so express it - “surprising,” but, as a fantasy, it is a wee bit tired. The author’s quaint fancies do not dance as they used to. They are more measured, more mechanical; there sometimes lies over them an atmosphere of “strain” ... to create laughter, the while one feels one wants to cry - that is true sentiment, that is real charm. This is the greatness of Barrie. He stirs within our hearts those foolish fancies which are the foundation of nearly all one’s day dreams. He does not make us think, but he makes us feel as we did when we were children and the world was full of wonder, and there was no such thing as the impossible, and people were either very good or very bad, and if they were good they were made happy ever afterwards, and if they were bad they were miserable and lonely because nobody loved them. But it seems to me I have done nothing to describe the play. Yet how can one relate a fantasy in the language of bald description? ... The play was received with the utmost enthusiasm. Which, when you come to think of it, leaves so little more to be said, doesn’t it?’. The Tatler, 29 March 1916. ‘Sir J. M. Barrie calls his new piece “A fancy in three acts,” but what it really is four fancies in four acts, for there are four principal scenes, and each scene is so different from the others as to constitute a fresh fancy of its own. It is true that the two chief characters, the policeman-prince and his Cinderella, continue throughout the piece, but they are met with in surroundings so new and whimsical that it is almost as impossible to think of “Cinderella” as a connected entertainment as it was to regard “Rosy Rapture” in the same light. In this sense it falls well below the standard of “The Admirable Crichton| and “What Every Woman Knows,” but is all the same a most agreeable succession of detached pictures in the comical-pathetic style so long associated with the Baronet’s name'. Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, 8 April 1916. ‘“A Kiss for Cinderella” is one of those plays which you either love or can’t sit through. I have heard people pass both these sentences upon it. Personally, I love it. It is almost as disjointed as a revue, but it is so charming and so perfectly played that you quite forget that it isn’t a play at all, but merely a stage fairy story for which somebody has forgotten the music’. The Tatler, 26 April 1916. ‘Last night at the New Theatre [sic] Sir J. M. Barrie’s play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” reached its 50th performance. The play appeals to … many different sides of human nature … There is the patriotic side – droll Private Danny in the nursing home, dancing with the prettily titled probationer, and showing the English soldier at his naughtiest and his most gallant’. The Times, Friday 28 April 1916. ‘“A Kiss for Cinderella” at Wyndham’s came to a close last night’. Sunday Mirror, 30 July 1916.
28 Aug 1916 Devonshire Park Theatre, EastbourneProfessional
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The Eastbourne Gazette, 23 August 1916, advertised ‘A Kiss for Cinderella’ at the Devonshire Park Theatre on Monday 28 August for three nights and a Wednesday matinee. The Era, 30 August 1916, published a review of the production. The cast included Hilda Trevelyan as Miss Thing, Percy Hutchison as the policeman, Mr. F. G. Thurstans as Mr Bodie, Charles B Bedells as the King, Annie Stallman as the Queen, Will Smith as Danny, Margaret Damer as Mrs Bodie, Esme Biddle as a Probationer, W Salver as Lord Mayor, and Alec Crichton as Lord Times. Also in a review in the Eastbourne Gazette, 30 August 1916: ‘A special word of praise must be given to Mr Will Smith in the part of Danny, the stolid-looking “boy in blue” who was the typical wounded Tommy to the life, solid and impressive, and yet bubbling over with that irresistible humour which is the priceless asset of the British soldier wherever he goes’.
31 Aug 1916 Hippodrome, MargateProfessional
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The Thanet Advertiser, Saturday 26 August 1916, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Margate Hippodrome on Thursday-Saturday in the following week, with a matinee on Wednesday.
4 Sep 1916 Theatre Royal, BournemouthProfessional
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The Bournemouth Graphic, 25 August 1916, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Theatre Royal, Bournemouth on Monday 4 September for six nights and two matinees. The Bournemouth Graphic, 8 September 1916, and the Bournemouth Guardian, 9 September 1916, published reviews of the production. The latter said, ‘Most war plays are mere frightfulness, but inasmuch as it is a war play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” notwithstanding its circumscriptions, sets a standard that is, alas! hardly likely to be approached. It exhales as wholesome and sweet a spirit as a wild flower’.
11 Sep 1916 Pleasure Gardens, FolkestoneProfessional
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The Folkestone Express, Sandgate, Shorncliffe & Hythe Advertiser, 19 August 1916, reported that Barrie’s ‘fantasy’ A Kiss for Cinderella was coming to the Pleasure Gardens Theatre, Folkestone on 11 September. The Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, 9 September 1916, published a preview of the production. The Folkestone Express, Sandgate, Shorncliffe & Hythe Advertiser, 16 September 1916, published a review of the production.
18 Sep 1916 Theatre Royal, NewcastleProfessional
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The Newcastle Daily Chronicle, 11 September 1916, advertised Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in A Kiss for Cinderella at the Theatre Royal in the following week. ‘Sir James Barrie, it is said, has given us nothing finer in the way of a fantasy play than “A Kiss for Cinderella,” which is due to make its debut at the Theatre Royal. In this work the creator of the immortal “Peter Pan” has blended comedy and pathos with his own peculiar genius, and for quaintness, irony, and tenderness it has not been excelled. Miss Hilda Trevelyan will appear in her original part, and will be supported by Mr Percy Hutchinson [sic], who brings to Newcastle the original production from Wyndham’s’. Newcastle Journal, 16 September 1916. The Newcastle Daily Chronicle, 19 September 1916, published a review of the production: ‘The hospital scene is Barrie’s topical contribution to the war, for we are brought hack to real life with the sufferings of the soldiers, with their uncomplaining good humour, with the somewhat strict lady doctor, and with the titled young lady who sinks her identity in the guise of a probationer’. The Newcastle Journal, 19 September 1916, also published a review of the production.
25 Sep 1916 King's Theatre, GlasgowProfessional
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The Daily Record, 21 September 1916, advertised Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in A Kiss for Cinderella at the King’s Theatre in the following week. The Daily Record and The Scotsman, 26 September 1916, published reviews of the production. The latter said, ‘Allusions to the war are never allowed to overshadow the atmosphere of fairyland which pervades the play’.
2 Oct 1916 Royal Lyceum Theatre, EdinburghProfessional
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The Scotsman, 27 September 1916, advertised Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in A Kiss for Cinderella at the Royal Lyceum Theatre in the following week. The Era, 27 September 1916, listed A Kiss for Cinderella as On The Road at the Lyceum, Edinburgh from 2 October.
9 Oct 1916 His Majesty's, AberdeenProfessional
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The Aberdeen Evening Express, 2 October 1916, advertised Hilda Trevelyan in A Kiss for Cinderella at His Majesty’s Theatre in the following week. The Aberdeen Evening Express, 10 October 1916, published a review of the production.
16 Oct 1916 Her Majesty's Theatre, DundeeProfessional
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The Dundee Courier, 9 October 1916, advertised Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in A Kiss for Cinderella at Her Majesty’s Theatre, Dundee in the following week. The Dundee Courier, 13 October 1916, published a preview of the production. The Dundee Evening Telegraph and the Dundee Courier, 17 October 1916, published reviews of the production. Letter from Percy Hutchison published in the Dundee Courier, 20 October 1916: ‘Sir, - Through your columns I should like to express my great astonishment at the indifferent support accorded to my company and production of Sir James M. Barrie’s beautiful play, “A Kiss for Cinderella.” In spite of the fact that I have engaged Miss Hilda Trevelyan for her original part; that I have brought down the London company and the entire original production, the theatre has only been half-filled at every performance so far. On Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday there were under twenty dress circle patrons. At Glasgow and Edinburgh the theatre was crowded every performance, hundreds being turned away, and the play had an exceptionally long run in London. A few years ago I produced “Brewster’s Millions” in Dundee, and the theatre was crowded nightly. Why it that an American farce should be so successful and a beautiful play like “A Kiss for Cinderella” fail to attract a Dundee audience? I am afraid it is not an inducement for me to present a Barrie play in Dundee again. With apologies for troubling you, I am, &c., Percy Hutchison. Her Majesty’s Theatre, Dundee, Oct. 19, 1916’. Letter signed ‘More Satisfaction’ in the Dundee Evening Telegraph, 29 December 1920: ‘Managers have found out people want to be amused if their theatres are to be paying propositions. “Art” is all very well, but there’s no money in Dundee. I well remember Barrie’s delightful “A Kiss for Cinderella” at Her Majesty’s, and the deplorable business it did, and heaps of| others I could name. Through lack of support we lost the theatre, and, though I was a frequent visitor there, I don’t think the opposition hurt the “King’s,” and I’ve faith enough in the “King’s” to believe it would fight the opposition if there were any’.
23 Oct 1916 Theatre Royal, BirminghamProfessional
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The Birmingham Daily Post, 9 October 1916, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Theatre Royal, Birmingham from 23 October. The Birmingham Daily Gazette, 24 October 1916, published a review of the production: ‘it is a very Barrie-ish combination of fairy war revue mixed with the old-fashioned “Cinderella”’. The Birmingham Mail and the Birmingham Daily Post, 24 October 1916, published reviews of the production.
30 Oct 1916 New Theatre, CardiffProfessional
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The Western Mail, 28 October 1916, advertised Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in A Kiss for Cinderella at the New Theatre, Cardiff from Monday 30 October. The Western Mail, 31 October 1916, published a review of the production.
6 Nov 1916 Theatre Royal, NottinghamProfessional
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The Nottingham Evening Post, 31 October 1916, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Theatre Royal, Nottingham in the following week. The Nottingham Evening Post, 7 November 1916, published a review of the production. ‘During the visit of Mr. Percy Hutchison’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” company to the Theatre Royal, Nottingham, Mr. Hutchison gave a matinée for the purpose of providing Christmas gifts for the Belgian soldiers in the trenches. The matinée was under the direct patronage of the Duchess of Portland, and was organised by the Countess Bailet Latour. A large and distinguished party came from Welbeck Abbey for the occasion. At the close of the performance tea was provided by the committee on the stage, when Mr. Percy Hutchison presented Miss Trevelyan and his company to the Duchess of Portland, Countess Bailet Latour, and Lady Lennox. The matinée was an unqualified success, hundreds being unable to obtain admission’. The Era, 22 November 1916.
13 Nov 1916 Theatre Royal, ManchesterProfessional
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The Sporting Times, 26 August 1916, reported that A Kiss for Cinderella would be at Manchester for two weeks, but did not say when or at which theatre. The Era, 8 November 1916, listed A Kiss for Cinderella as On The Road at the Theatre Royal, Manchester from 13 November. The Manchester Evening News, 14 November 1916, published a review of the production. An advertisement in the Manchester Evening News, 16 November 1916, made it clear that the production would be at the Theatre Royal until 25 November.
27 Nov 1916 Royal Court, LiverpoolProfessional
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The Liverpool Daily Post, 27 July 1916, listed “A Kiss for Cinderella, ‘one of the baronet author’s most charming and whimsical creations’ among the new plays to come to the Royal Court Theatre. The Liverpool Echo, 21 November 1916, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Royal Court Theatre in the following week. The Liverpool Echo, 28 November 1916, published a review of the production.
4 Dec 1916 Grand, LeedsProfessional
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The Leeds Mercury, Friday 1 December 1916, advertised Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in Barrie’s ‘fancy’ A Kiss for Cinderella at the Grand Theatre commencing Monday 4 December for six nights, a special matinee on Tuesday and a matinee also on Saturday. The Leeds Mercury, 5 December 1916, published a review of the production: the play ‘is free from any association with politics or modern mentalities, if not from society or the war’.
23 Dec 1916 Kingsway Theatre, LondonProfessional
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‘Lovers of a pretty play and an artistic production will learn with pleasure that Mr. Percy Hutchison has taken the Kingsway for Christmas, and will put on there a special production pf “A Kiss for Cinderella,” the Barrie fantasy which enjoyed so much popularity at Wyndham’s. There will be two performances daily during the Christmas holidays, commencing on Dec. 23. Miss Hilda Trevelyan will again appear as Cinderella, and Mr. Hutchison as the Policeman-Prince, supported by a powerful cast, and a special feature will be made of the ballroom scene. The company will be sixty strong. During the wonderfully successful tour of “A Kiss for Cinderella,” which finishes on Saturday at the Grand Theatre, Leeds, the receipts averaged from £1,200 to £1,400 a week. Miss Hilda Trevelyan, in her original character of Cinderella, repeated her London success, and she and Mr. Hutchison have had enthusiastic receptions everywhere. The inclusion of the piece in the London Christmas entertainments is a distinct gain to the metropolis’. The Era, 6 December 1916. By a happy arrangement with Mr. Frank Curzon and Mr. Gerald du Maurier, “A Kiss for Cinderella” will be played at the Kingsway Theatre twice daily from Saturday, Dec. 23 onwards under the management of Mr. Percy Hutchison, who will himself play the Policeman-Prince. Miss Hilda Trevelyan, who delighted London with her character of Cinderella, has fortunately been secured for the heroine of the Barrie phantasy, and a powerful cast has been engaged’. The People, Sunday 17 December 1916. The Times (26 December 1916), The Pall Mall Gazette and The Globe (both 27 December 1916), the Western Morning News (1 January 1917) and The Sketch (10 January 1917) published reviews of the production. ‘Mr . Percy Hutchison announces that, owing to the strain on Miss Trevelyan in playing twice daily, he has had to curtail the evening performances of “A Kiss for Cinderella” at the Kingsway, which will now be played on Thursdays and Saturdays, with matinées daily, as usual’. The Stage, 4 January 1917. ‘I am delighted to hear that the revival of “A Kiss for Cinderella,” at the Kingsway, is meeting with so much success that Mr. Percy Hutchison has decided to prolong his season there ... I should not be surprised if “A Kiss for Cinderella” does eventually rival “Peter Pan” in the affections of the play-going public’. The People, 14 January 1917. ‘Mr . Percy Hutchison, owing to his outstanding provincial contracts, is compelled to withdraw “A Kiss for Cinderella” from the Kingsway on Saturday. The spring tour opens at Portsmouth, followed by Brighton, Bristol, Birmingham, Edinburgh, Glasgow, York, and Southport’. The Stage, Thursday 1 February 1917.
12 Feb 1917 Theatre Royal, PortsmouthProfessional
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The Hampshire Telegraph, Friday 9 February 1917, advertised Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in Barrie’s ‘greatest success’ A Kiss for Cinderella at the Theatre Royal, Portsmouth in the following week. The Era, 14 February 1917, carried an advertisement for Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in A Kiss for Cinderella; this week Theatre Royal, Portsmouth, next week Theatre Royal, Brighton.
19 Feb 1917 Theatre Royal, BrightonProfessional
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The Era, 14 February 1917, carried an advertisement for Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in A Kiss for Cinderella; this week Theatre Royal, Portsmouth, next week Theatre Royal, Brighton.
26 Feb 1917 Gaiety Theatre, HastingsProfessional
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The Hastings and St Leonard’s Observer, Saturday 17 February 1917, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Gaiety Theatre, Hastings from February 26th. The Hastings and St Leonard’s Observer, Saturday 24 February 1917, published a preview of the production, which mentioned that Violet Harley would play Cinderella. The Hastings and St Leonard’s Observer, Saturday 3 March 1917, published a review of the production, mentioning that Violet Harley played Cinderella.
5 Mar 1917 Prince's Theatre, BristolProfessional
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The Western Daily Press, Monday 26 February 1917, advertised Percy Hutchison and Hilda Trevelyan in A Kiss for Cinderella at the Prince’s Theatre, Bristol in the following week. The Western Daily Press, 6 March 1917, published a review of the production.
12 Mar 1917 Theatre Royal, BirminghamProfessional
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The Birmingham Daily Post, Wednesday 28 February 1917, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Theatre Royal, Birmingham from 12 March. The Birmingham Daily Gazette, the Birmingham Daily Post and the Birmingham Mail (all 13 March 1917) published reviews of the production. The Birmingham Daily Post, 16 March 1917, advertised the last two nights of Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in A Kiss for Cinderella at the Theatre Royal, Birmingham.
19 Mar 1917 Grand Theatre, CroydonProfessional
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The Norwood News (9 March 1917) and the Surrey Mirror (13 and 16 March 1917) advertised Percy Hutchison and Hilda Trevelyan in A Kiss for Cinderella at the Grand Theatre, Croydon from 19 March for six nights and two matinees. The Surrey Mirror, 16 March 1917, published a preview of the production. The Surrey Mirror, 23 March 1917, published a review of the production.
9 Apr 1917 King's Theatre, GlasgowProfessional
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The Daily Record, Tuesday 3 and 4 April 1917, advertised Percy Hutchison and Hilda Trevelyan in A Kiss for Cinderella at the King’s Theatre, Glasgow in the following week. The Daily Record, 10 April 1917, published a review of the production.
16 Apr 1917 Royal Lyceum Theatre, EdinburghProfessional
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The Scotsman, 9 April 1917, advertised Percy Hutchison and Hilda Trevelyan in A Kiss for Cinderella at the Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh from 16 April for six nights and two matinees. The Scotsman, 17 April 1917, published a review of the production.
23 Apr 1917 Opera House, SouthportProfessional
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The Liverpool Echo, 20 April 1917, advertised Percy Hutchison and Hilda Trevelyan in A Kiss for Cinderella at the Opera House, Southport from 23 April for six nights and two matinees. The Liverpool Echo, 20 April 1917, published a preview of the production.
30 Apr 1917 Theatre Royal, YorkProfessional
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‘Mr. Percy Hutchison is bringing his tour, with “A Kiss for Cinderella,” to an end at his own theatres, Southport and York. Ever since last September, he tells us, the piece has been to receipts to receipts averaging £1,000 to £1,400 a week, which would seem to be an argument for the continuance of the tour’. The Stage, 26 April 1917.
13 Aug 1917 Pier Theatre, EastbourneProfessional
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The Eastbourne Gazette, 8 August 1917, advertised Percy Hutchison and Hilda Trevelyan in A Kiss for Cinderella at the Pier Theatre, Eastbourne commencing Monday 13 August for six nights and two matinees. The Eastbourne Gazette, 15 August 1917, published a review of the production: ‘The play is brought down by Mr. Percy Hutchison, supported by his Kingsway Theatre company, including Miss Hilda Trevelyan in her original part of Cinderella. This will be the only appearance of Mr. Hutchison and Miss Trevelyan in the play this autumn’.
20 Aug 1917 Opera House, BuxtonProfessional
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Percy Hutchison advertised in The Stage, 2 August 1917, for ‘a First-class Theatre for “A Kiss for Cinderella,” August 23, to follow Buxton, three nights’. The Era, Wednesday 22 August 1917, listed A Kiss for Cinderella as On The Road at the O. H., Buxton from 20 August.
23 Aug 1917 Opera House, BridlingtonProfessional
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The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Tuesday 21 August 1917, reported ‘some incidents of the season’ on the Yorkshire coast: ‘For three nights one may see Barrie’s play “A Kiss for Cinderella”’ at Bridlington. ‘In the Opera house, animated pictures first half week; Thursday, Friday and Saturday, “A Kiss for Cinderella”’. The Era, Wednesday 22 August 1917.
10 Sep 1917 Opera House, ScarboroughProfessional
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‘Indoor attractions this week include Sir James Barrie’s play, “Kiss for Cinderella,” at the Opera House’. Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Tuesday 11 September 1917. The precise dates are conjectural.
17 Sep 1917 Opera House, HarrogateProfessional
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The Harrogate Herald, 12 September 1917, advertised Miss Emma Hutchison and Mr Percy Hutchison’s company in A Kiss for Cinderella (‘The great success from Wyndham’s and the Kingsway theatres’) at the Opera House, Harrogate from Monday 17 September for six nights and two matinees.
24 Sep 1917 Grand Theatre, HullProfessional
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The Hull Daily Mail, Thursday 20 September 1917, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Grand Theatre, Hull in the following week. The Hull Daily Mail, 21 September 1917, published a preview of the production: Gertrude Lang was to play Miss Thing and Mr. Pennington-Gush the policeman/prince. The Hull Daily Mail, 25 September 1917, published a review of the production: ‘It is quite a whimsical, weird, unearthly thing, although it is connected with the war’.
1 Oct 1917 Grand, BlackpoolProfessional
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The Stage, 27 September 1917, listed A Kiss for Cinderella as On Tour at the Grand, Blackpool from 1 October.
8 Oct 1917 Empire, BradfordProfessional
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The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Monday 8 October 1917, listed A Kiss for Cinderella at the Empire Theatre, Bradford that day. Otherwise the dates are conjectural.
15 Oct 1917 Prince's Theatre, ManchesterProfessional
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The Manchester Evening News, Monday 8 October 1917, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Prince’s Theatre in the following week. ‘A pleasant prospect is in store for the Prince’s patrons. Sir J. M. Barrie’s delightful play, “A Kiss from- Cinderella,” will be there, pioneered by F. Pennington-Gush and Miss Gertrude Lang. We get too little chance nowadays of coming under the magical charm of the wizard Barrie’. Manchester Evening News, 13 October 1917. The Manchester Evening News, 16 October 1917, published a review of the production.
22 Oct 1917 New Theatre, CambridgeProfessional
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The Cambridge Daily News (14 August 1917) and the Cambridge Independent Press (17 August 1917) reported that A Kiss for Cinderella would play at the New Theatre, Cambridge on 22-24 October. ‘There are two attractive bookings [at the New Theatre] for next week - “A Kiss for Cinderella” and “Daddy Long Legs”’. Cambridge Daily News, Tuesday 16 October 1917. The Era, 17 October 1917, listed A Kiss for Cinderella as On The Road from 22 October at ‘Cambridge (3), Oxford (3)’. The Cambridge Daily News, 23 October, 1917, published a review of the production: ‘The poor little downtrodden maid … seeks to do her bit in wartime by taking charge of four little children who have no one else to care for them’.
25 Oct 1917 New Theatre, OxfordProfessional
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The Era, 17 October 9117, listed A Kiss for Cinderella as On The Road from 22 October at ‘Cambridge (3), Oxford (3)’. ‘For Thursday, with a matinee on Saturday, Miss Emma Hutchison and Mr. Percy Hutchison’s company is booked with “A Kiss for Cinderella”’ at the New Theatre, Oxford. The Era, 24 October 1917.
29 Oct 1917 Theatre Royal, BournemouthProfessional
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The Bournemouth Graphic, 26 October 1917, announced, ‘On Monday next, a return visit of J. M. Barrie’s fantasy, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” is announced at the Theatre Royal. The Bournemouth Graphic, 26 October 1917, published a preview of the production. The Bournemouth Graphic, 2 November 1917, published a review of the production: ‘As with all of Barrie’s famous works, there is a charming mixture of fairy story and realism with this dainty production, and in order to be thoroughly up-to-date the author has blended with it many light touches of the war, in which humour, pathos and charm each play their respective parts’.
5 Nov 1917 Grand, SouthamptonProfessional
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The Hampshire Advertiser, Saturday 3 November 1917, reported, ‘Mr. Perry Hutchison’s Company in J. M. Barrie’s fairy play “A Kiss for Cinderella,” pays its first visit to the Grand Theatre next week’ and previewed the production. The Hampshire Advertiser, 10 November 1917, published a review of the production: ‘It comes to these perturbed days as a spiritual balm, notwithstanding that it has touches about the war’.
12 Nov 1917 Theatre Royal, BrightonProfessional
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The Mid Sussex Times, 13 November 1917, listed among the amusements that week in Brighton A Kiss for Cinderella at the Theatre Royal for six nights and two matinees.
19 Nov 1917 Borough Theatre, StratfordProfessional
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‘Young and old can delight in that interesting play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” which is the forthcoming attraction at the Borough Theatre, Stratford, next Monday. The play presents Sir James Barrie in his best vein. Poetry, humanity, imagination, tenderness. Everything. It is triumph for all concerned. Miss Emma and Mr. Percy Hutchison present their principal company in this great fantasy, headed by Miss Gertrude Lang and Mr. F. Pennington-Gush’. East London Observer, Saturday 17 November 1917.
26 Nov 1917 Marlborough Theatre, Holloway, LondonProfessional
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The People, Sunday 25 November 1917, advertised A Kiss for Cinderella at the Marlboro’ Theatre, Holloway, London N, nightly with matinees on Thursday and Saturday. The Stage, 29 November 1917, listed A Kiss for Cinderella as On Tour at the Marlborough, Holloway.
20 Dec 1917 Queen's Theatre, LondonProfessional
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The Sporting Times, 1 and 8 December 1917, listed A Kiss for Cinderella as opening at the Queen’s Theatre on Thursday 20 December. ‘[A] matinee of interest will be given at the Queen’s on the 20th inst., when, in aid of the Queen’s Hospital for Soldiers and Sailors at Frognal, “A Kiss for Cinderella” will be revived, with Hilda Trevelyan and Percy Hutchison in the principal parts. Barrie’s charming play will afterwards be given for a series of matinees the Queen’s, where “Brewster’s Millions” will continue the attraction for the evening bill. Mr. Hutchison has received intimation that the Queen will be present at the performance in aid the hospital’. The People, 2 December 1917. ‘At the matinee at which the Queen has signified her intention of being present at the Queen’s next Thursday, besides “A Kiss for Cinderella,” in which Percy Hutchison and Hilda Trevelyan will appear, Marie Lohr will make an appeal for the Frognal Hospital, specially written by Louis N. Parker, and Madge Titheradge will recite “For England.”’. The People, 16 December 1917. The Globe (24 December 1917), The Tatler (26 December 1917), the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News (29 December 1917) and the Illustrated London News (12 January 1918) published reviews of the production. ‘Mr. Percy Hutchison had decided to terminate his Christmas revival “A Kiss for Cinderella” this week, but owing to the great demand for seats he has been obliged to continue it for an extra week’. The Globe, Thursday 7 February 1918. ‘Queen Alexandra has promised to be present at the matinée performance of “A Kiss for Cinderella,” to be given at the Queen’s Theatre next Friday [15 February], for the benefit of the Y.M.C.A. Hut Fund’. The Globe, Saturday 9 February 1918. ‘Mr. Percy Hutchison announces that owing to the great demand to see Sir James Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella,” the run will be further extended’. The People, 17 February 1918. The Pall Mall Gazette, Friday 1 March 1918, advertised ‘positively [the] last performance’ of A Kiss for Cinderella at the Queen’s Theatre the following (Saturday) afternoon.
20 Apr 1923 Connaught Hall, WorthingAmateur
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‘I hear that two plays are being rehearsed for performance in aid of the fund for the new wing of the hospital which is to be opened on April 10, and it is hoped that Worthing people will well support this amateur dramatic venture when it takes place after Easter. I understand that most amusing comedy “The Young Person in Pink,” by Gertrude Jennings, is one of the plays selected, the other being the whimsically humorous piece, “A Kiss for Cinderella.” By Sir J. M. Barrie’. Worthing Herald, 24 March 1923. The Worthing Herald, 14 April 1923, reported that A Kiss for Cinderella would be performed at the Connaught Hall on 20 and 21 April. The play was performed by The Worthing Players (recalled by the West Sussex Gazette, 15 January 1925).
24 Jan 1924 Maynard School, ExeterSchool
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‘The staff and pupils of the Maynard School, Exeter, are to be heartily congratulated upon the success that attended an initial presentation of “A Kiss for Cinderella” by Sir James Barrie which took place last evening before a large audience in the School Assembly Hall. Further performances will be given this afternoon at 2.30 and to-morrow night at 7.30 … Although, in point of fact, it is a war play, “A Kiss for Cinderella” holds an appeal that is just as effective now that the stress of war is past’. Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 25 January 1924. ‘At the beginning of the spring term [Maynard School, Exeter] produced Sir James Barrie’s play “A Kiss for Cinderella.” Miss Falconer as stage manager had a great part in making the play such a success. The performances resulted in a profit of £125, which was added to the School Extension and Equipment fund. (Applause.)’. Headmistress’s speech at Speech Day, 30 January 1925, reported in the Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 31 January 1925.
6 Feb 1924 Girls' County School, HarrowSchool
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‘In aid of the Save the Children Fund pupils of the Girls’ County School gave scenes from J M. Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” at the School on Wednesday. Successful presentations were given afternoon and evening to large audiences’. Uxbridge & W. Drayton Gazette, Friday 8 February 1924.
20 Dec 1924 Haymarket Theatre, LondonProfessional
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‘On or about the afternoon of Saturday, December 20, at the Haymarket, Mr. Frederick Harrison will revive Sir James Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella,” with Miss Hilda Trevelyan again as Miss Thing. “Cinderella” will be given at daily matinees, so that the run of Galsworthy’s “Old English” (due for first production next week) will not be interfered with’. The Stage, 16 October 1924. Also mentioned in The Times of the same date. The production was reviewed by several newspapers: The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer (22 December 1924: ‘We shall be surprised if this war-period play does not become one of London’s annual Christmas shows’); the Sheffield Daily Telegraph (22 December 1924: ‘As a nation, we seem to have almost forgotten the great lesson of service and sacrifice taught us by the war, and it is well that this play should be revived, for here Barrie is both poet end teacher’); The Scotsman (22 December 1924: ‘It was written, of course, in war time, and it may not be altogether fantastic to read into it something of the stress those tragic years imposed on an acutely sensitive mind. It is already out of date for those who can remember the war, and huge slices of it must be altogether incomprehensible to the rising generation. But the war atmosphere of the setting, impermanent and outworn, is as nothing beside the scenes of fantasy which reveal the true Barrie’); the Yorkshire Evening Post (22 December 1924 and 3 January 1925); The Stage (24 December 1924); the Dundee Courier (26 December 1924); and The Sketch (31 December 1924). ‘The run of “Old English” at the Haymarket will be suspended on Wednesday week, January 14, and “A Kiss for Cinderella” will be given at evening as well as afternoon performances’. The Stage, 8 January 1925. ‘The last performance of “A Kiss for Cinderella,” at the Haymarket, will be on Saturday, February 14.’ The Stage, 5 February 1925.
28 Mar 1925 Welfare Association, PortsmouthAmateur
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‘Four days were given up at Portsmouth to the local Welfare Association’s annual musical competition festival, which concluded on Saturday. The festival is confined to the youth of the town. One of the most interesting features was the improvement shown by the young people in their dramatic effort … Barrie’s delightful fantasy “A Kiss for Cinderella” was chosen by the older competitors, under twenty-three, and this was creditably played by the Francis Avenue Old Girls Club’. The Stage, Thursday 2 April 1925. The performance date shown is conjectural.
1 Apr 1925 Barry Count Schools, BarrySchool
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‘“A Kiss for Cinderella,” by Sir J. M. Barrie, was performed by the pupils of the Barry County Schools on Wednesday’. Western Mail, Thursday 2 April 1925, with two photographs of some of the cast.
28 May 1926 St Margaret’s School for Girls, AberdeenSchool
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The Aberdeen Press and Journal, 28 May 1926, advertised performances, in aid of local charities, of Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella by St Margaret’s School for Girls’ Dramatic Club, Aberdeen, in the High School Hall on 28 and 29 May.
3 Dec 1926 Liverpool College for Girls, LiverpoolSchool
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The Liverpool Echo, Monday 6 December 1926, published a photograph captioned ‘Miss F Shaw, a bobbed-haired bobbie, has suspicions when taking a report from Cinderella (Miss D. Pickering Jones) about her lost shoe, in “A Kiss for Cinderella,” performed by the students of the Liverpool College for Girls’. The performance date shown is conjectural.
20 Dec 1926 Grand Theatre, DerbyUnknown
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The Derby Daily Telegraph, 2 December 1926, advertised ‘The Midland Dramatic Society will present Sir J. M. Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” at the Grand Theatre, Dec. 20th-24th, 1926’. The Derby Daily Telegraph, 15 December 1926, published a preview of the production: ‘In many of the … characters can be traced quaintly satirical suggestions of the times when the play was produced - a time when England was war-stricken; when people were heavily charged with anxieties, full of new and hitherto unknown terrors; existing in darkened houses in fear of Zeppelins and the daily bulletins of the terrors of war. These, however, are treated in a vein of pleasing humour such as only Barrie can give expression to’. The Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal, 17 December 1926, also published a preview of the production.
23 Dec 1926 Playhouse, LiverpoolProfessional
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‘The Playhouse Christmas show, “A Kiss for Cinderella” (Barrie) will be produced on Thursday, Dec. 23. Mr. Norman O’Neill has written special music for the fantasy’. Liverpool Echo, 12 November 1926. The Liverpool Echo, 3 December 1926, reported that Miss Emmie Arthur Williams would play Cinderella and Mr. Sebastian Shaw would play the policeman and the prince. The Stage (30 December 1926) and the Liverpool Echo (4 January 1927) published reviews of the production. The Liverpool Echo, Tuesday 25 January 1927, advertised the last two weeks of A Kiss for Cinderella at the Playhouse and said that The Mask and The Face would open on Monday 7 February.
14 Jan 1927 Assembly Room, ChichesterAmateur
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‘A theatrical license for a month was granted in respect of the Assembly Room, Miss Hannah and Canon Mortlock entering into sureties. The application arose out of the production this week of the Girl Guide Rangers’ play, “A Kiss for Cinderella.”’ Chichester Observer, Wednesday 12 January 1927. Also the Bognor Regis Observer of the same date. The West Sussex Gazette listed among forthcoming events performance on 14 and 15 January at the Assembly Room, Chichester of A Kiss for Cinderella by Chichester Rangers (senior Girl Guides). The Hampshire Telegraph (14 January 1927) and the Chichester Observer (19 January 1927) published reviews of the production.
23 Mar 1927 Chesterfield High School, ChesterfieldAmateur
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‘Sir J. M. Barrie’s comedy, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” was given by Chesterfield High School Old Girls’ Dramatic Society in the High School last night, before a large audience. The play, which is produced by Miss D. W. Greaves, was excellently presented by former students at the school, the chief parts being taken by Misses C. Rich, Mallard, D. White, K. Margerison, L. Vincent Smith, C. Dronfield, and E. Kelly. Music was provided between the acts by Miss F. Wright (violin), Mr. Higginbottom (‘cello), and Miss Wintle (piano). The performance will be repeated to-night, and the proceeds will be applied to the almost completed fund of £500 for providing an annuity for Miss Stevens, who was joint founder and principal of the High School for 18 years’. Sheffield Daily Telegraph, Thursday 24 March 1927.
16 Dec 1927 Market Hall, RedhillAmateur
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‘Reigate County School girls gave a clever performance, at the Market Hall, Redhill, on Friday, of Sir James Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella.” There was a crowded and appreciative company’. West Sussex Gazette, Thursday 22 December 1927. The Surrey Mirror, 23 December 1927, also published a review of the production.
16 Dec 1927 Leas Pavilion, FolkestoneSchool
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‘Two functions took place at the Leas Pavilion on Friday last. In the afternoon, the girls of St. Stephen’s School, Earls Avenue, produced Barrie’s deliciously whimsical “Kiss for Cinderella,” and very cleverly indeed did they realise and interpret the phantasy of war politics, and ever popular folk-lore. The costumes, particularly in the Court scene, were very lovely …’. Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, Saturday 24 December 1927.
26 Dec 1927 Little Theatre, BristolProfessional
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The Western Daily Press, 20 July 1927, reported that Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella would be performed from Monday 26 December to Wednesday 4 January 1928 at the Little Theatre. Also the Western Daily Press, 6 September 1927. The Western Daily Press, 21 December 1927, published a preview of the production. It named the principals as: Cinderella, Janet Morrison; The Policeman, Clive Morton; Mr. Bodie, Ralph Hutton; The Queen, Joan Ingram; The King, Mervyn Johns; Dr. Bodie, Gipsy Ellis; and Fairy Godmother, Paula Trevanion. The Western Daily Press, 27 and 30 December 1927, published reviews of the production.
20 Apr 1928 Church Hall, BrislingtonAmateur
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‘The Brislington Players on Friday and Saturday evenings gave a performance of Sir J. M. Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” in ‘the Church Hall, Brislington, in aid of Wick House “Toddlers” Home Clothing Fund. The staging and acting left nothing to be desired, and the whole performance must rank as an unqualified success …’. Western Daily Press, Monday 23 April 1928.
6 Jun 1928 Digby Assembly Rooms, SherborneSchool
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‘If there was one factor more than another which accounted for the packed hall of the Assembly-rooms on Wednesday it was perhaps the reputation which Lord Digby’s School [Sherborne, Dorset] has attained for the performance of delightful plays … the School has done nothing more successfully than “A Kiss for Cinderella,” which was produced on Wednesday evening and Thursday afternoon in aid of school funds’. Western Gazette, Friday 8 June 1928.
14 Dec 1928 Fosse Bank School, TonbridgeSchool
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‘Sir James Barrie’s popular play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” was the principal feature of the Christmas entertainment by the Pupils’ Dramatic Society at Fosse Bank School, Tonbridge. It is a play dealing with the closing years of the war, and has a definitely war-time atmosphere. There were over 30 players, and all acquitted themselves creditably’. Kent & Sussex Courier, Friday 21 December 1928. Also the Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser, Friday 21 December 1928. Neither newspaper gave a date for the performance. The date shown is conjectural. The pupils of Fosse Bank School performed the play again in December 1936.
24 Dec 1928 Playhouse, NewcastleProfessional
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‘Playhouse patrons are being catered for during the three weeks following Monday, Dec. 24th, by the delightful Christmas play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” by J. M. Barrie’. The Era, 2 January 1929. ‘“A Kiss for Cinderella” enters its third and last week [at the Playhouse, Newcastle-on-Tyne], and is still drawing crowded audiences. Donald Gilbert, Mary Pettie, and Kendrew Milson, the chief performers, are keeping their fine acting up to the high level of the opening night. Mr. Boffy Cole is now playing Denny [sic], in place of Alec Weeks, and gives a capital rendering of the part’. The Stage, 10 January 1929.
26 Dec 1928 Century Theatre, LondonProfessional
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The Era, 19 December 1928, listed among forthcoming events on 26 December ‘“A Kiss for Cinderella” (Lena Ashwell Players), Century’. The Era, Wednesday 2 January 1929, published a review of the production. The closing date shown is conjectural.
1 Feb 1929 Public Hall, CallanderAmateur
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‘“A Kiss for Cinderella,” one of the delightful plays by Sir J. M. Barrie, was staged in the Public Hall, Callander [Stirling], on Friday evening last by Miss Maisie Fotheringham’s elocution class. There was a packed hall, and the presentation, which was complete with scenery and dresses, was greatly appreciated, and compliments were bestowed all round’. Falkirk Herald, Saturday 9 February 1929.
13 Dec 1929 King Edward’s Grammar School for Girls, BirminghamSchool
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‘The ambitious task of performing Barrie’s “A Kiss lot Cinderella” with a cast entirely composed of girls was successfully undertaken by the pupils of King Edward’s Grammar School for Girls, Camp Hill, last evening, in aid of a fund for providing the school with proper stage equipment’. Birmingham Daily Gazette, 14 December 1929.
14 Dec 1929 Huddersfield Technical College, HuddersfieldAmateur
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‘In aid of the Huddersfield Distressed ex-Servicemen’s Fund the students of the Huddersfield Technical College presented Barrie’s play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” in the College Hall, on Saturday evening. The quality of the acting was uneven, but Miss Florence Tattersall as Cinderella gave a sympathetic and charming performance. Miss Alice Livesey was excellent as Dr. Nellie Bodie, and Mr. Joe Lawson made the policeman a real Barrie figure. The play was well staged’. Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Monday 16 December 1929. The Leeds Mercury of the same date published a photograph of some of the cast.
23 Dec 1929 Repertory Theatre, PlymouthProfessional
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‘This year in Plymouth … at the Repertory Theatre Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” will run for two weeks’. Western Morning News, 30 November 1929. The Western Morning News, Tuesday 24 and 31 December 1929, published reviews of the production.
6 Jan 1930 Rusholme Repertory Theatre, ManchesterProfessional
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‘The success that has attended the staging of Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” has prompted the management to retain it for a further week’s run’ at the Rusholme Repertory Theatre, Manchester. The Stage, Thursday 16 January 1930.
27 Feb 1930 Victoria Pavilion, IlfracombeSchool
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The North Devon Journal, 6 February 1930, advertised that the Ilfracombe Secondary School Dramatic Society would present Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella at the Victoria Pavilion on Thursday 27 February.
4 Apr 1930 Merrywood Secondary School, Southville, BristolSchool
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‘“A Kiss for Cinderella,” J. H.[sic] Barrie’s delightful comedy, was played by the pupils of Merrywood Secondary School at Southville [Bristol] last evening …’. Western Daily Press, 5 April 1930.
27 May 1930 Staveley Grammar School, Staveley, ChesterfieldSchool
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The Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald, 17 May 1930, advertised that the pupils of Staveley Grammar School [Chesterfield] would present scenes from A Kiss for Cinderella in the Markham Hall on 27 and 28 May.
28 Nov 1930 Derby High School, DerbySchool
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The Derby Daily Telegraph, 14 November 1930, mentioned the forthcoming production in aid of the Scholarship Fund and published a review on 29 November.
23 Mar 1931 Theatre Royal, WolverhamptonProfessional
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The Stage, 19 March 1931, reported that the company at the Royal Theatre, Wolverhampton announced A Kiss for Cinderella for next week.
13 Apr 1931 Little Theatre, BristolProfessional
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The Western Daily Press, 12 December 1930, mentioned the forthcoming production. The Western Daily Press, 9 April 1931, advertised the production. On 10 April it published a preview and on 14 April a review.
8 Jun 1931 Ampleforth College, AmpleforthSchool
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The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Tuesday 9 June 1931, reported that Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella was performed the previous night by the Ampleforth College Dramatic Society.
7 Sep 1931 Repertory Theatre, PlymouthProfessional
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‘Encouraged by previous success the Repertory Players are reproducing Sir J. M. Barrie’s charming play “A Kiss for Cinderella,” and the patronage accorded it last night is an indication that large and appreciative audiences will be the order for the remainder of the week’. Western Morning News, 8 September 1931.
5 Oct 1931 Alexandra Theatre, BirminghamProfessional
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‘Mr. Salberg’s repertory players are to put [a] Barrie play on at the Alexandra next week - “A Kiss For Cinderella.” Birmingham Daily Gazette, Saturday 3 October 1931. The newspaper published a review on 6 October 1931.
18 Nov 1931 Parish Hall, Bishopston, BristolAmateur
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The Western Daily Press, 18 November 1931, advertised that Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella would be presented by pupils of North Bristol Central School on 18-20 November at Bishopston Parish Hall.
11 Dec 1931 Grand Hotel, FolkestoneSchool
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‘Excellent Production by Kent College Girls. Before a large gathering of parents and friends the pupils of Kent College performed their annual play at the Grand Hotel on Friday last week. The play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” by J. M. Barrie, was outstanding for the finish of the entire production. Much credit is reflected upon Miss Phyllis Newnham, the producer, for the high individual standard of such a large cast. The dressing of the play, particularly in the palace scene, was all that could be desired, and full proof of the young actors’ success was given by the loud applause at the close of the production’. Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, Saturday 19 December 1931.
18 Dec 1931 Grammar School, Melton MowbraySchool
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‘On Friday and Saturday evenings next week the annual performances by the players of the Melton Mowbray Grammar School are being given in the School Hall. This year they are presenting “A Kiss for Cinderella,” a charming play Sir James Barrie, and a treat may, as usual, be anticipated’. Grantham Journal, Saturday 12 December 1931. The Grantham Journal, 24 December 1931, reviewed the production.
28 Dec 1931 Lyric, GlasgowProfessional
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‘The Scottish Players announce an interesting series of productions for their winter Season at Glasgow. The Christmas attraction will be Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella”. The Era, 11 November 1931. ‘The Scottish National Players make a notable contribution to the holiday entertainments in Glasgow by presenting “A Kiss for Cinderella,” one of Barrie’s delightful works, written in the early years of the war. The fanciful story of a London waif who dreams she is Cinderella and wins a prince in the person of a policeman is unfolded in the author’s best vein, which appeals alike to old and young. The limited accommodation of the stage in the Lyric Theatre was utilised to the best advantage last night, and the large audience thoroughly enjoyed the performance …’. The Scotsman, Tuesday 29 December 1931. The dates shown are conjectural.
27 Jan 1932 Adam Smith Hall, KirkcaldyAmateur
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The Fife Free Press & Kirkcaldy Guardian, 9 January 1932, advertised that the Kirkcaldy Girls’ Club Y.W.C.A. Dramatic Group would present Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella in the Adam Smith Hall on 27 and 29 January. The Dundee Evening Telegraph, 28 January 1932, reviewed the production.
26 Dec 1932 Rusholme Repertory Theatre, ManchesterProfessional
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‘The Rusholme Repertory Players could not have made a happier choice for their Christmas production than Sir J. M. Barrie’s “Fancy” play, “A Kiss for Cinderella.” The Stage, Friday 30 December 1932. Also The Era of the same date. The Stage, 5 January 1933, reported that the production was in its second and last week.
3 Feb 1933 Hamilton House, Tunbridge WellsAmateur
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‘Through the kindness of the principals, Miss Ferguson and Miss Body, a hundred wives of unemployed men were entertained at a delightful concert at Hamilton House on Friday. Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” was cleverly performed the 3rd A Girl Guide Company, under the direction of Miss Mackean. Refreshments, which were given by Miss Ferguson and Miss Body, were served to the guests and a thoroughly enjoyable evening was spent. Thanks were accorded the hostesses for their hospitality and the delightful entertainment’. Kent & Sussex Courier, Friday 10 February 1933.
18 Dec 1933 New Theatre, LondonProfessional
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The Times, Monday 18 December 1933, announced that the Queen would that day attend a matinée performance of A Kiss for Cinderella at the New Theatre in aid of the Winter Distress League. The Scotsman and several other newspapers, 19 December 1933, reported the occasion.
15 Jan 1934 New Theatre, LondonProfessional
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The Times, 2 January 1934, advertised a special matinée performance of A Kiss for Cinderella in aid of the Winter Distress League at the New Theatre on Monday 15 January. Also The Bystander, 10 January 1934.
15 Feb 1934 City Hall, BrechinAmateur
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‘Up to now, this has been a somewhat lean season with regard to play production amongst our various dramatic companies, and the announcement of the forthcoming production of Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” by the Girls’ Club is therefore specially welcome. The production of this most delightful of Barrie’s plays is in the capable hands of Miss Catherine Hollingworth, L.R.A.M. (Eloc.), whose excellent work with the Dramatic section of the Club is so well-known, and a really delightful evening is assured for all at the City Hall on Thursday week’. Brechin Advertiser, Tuesday 30 January 1934. The production was deferred to the 15th and the Dundee Courier, 16 February 1934, reviewed it.
5 Mar 1934 New Theatre, LondonProfessional
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The Times, 28 February 1934, announced that a Star matinée performance of A Kiss for Cinderella would take place at the New Theatre on Monday 5 March in aid of the Winter Distress League.
22 Nov 1934 His Majesty's Theatre, LondonProfessional
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The Times, 15 October 1934, reported that the ballroom scene from A Kiss for Cinderella would be among the items performed in aid of the Actors’ Benevolent Fund at the Gerald du Maurier Memorial matinée at His Majesty’s Theatre on 22 November. The Era, 28 November 1934, reported the event.
31 Dec 1934 Prince's Theatre, BradfordProfessional
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‘The Terence Byron Repertory company are presenting yet another of Sir James Barrie’s delightful fantasies in “A Kiss foe Cinderella.” The play is particularly well mounted, considering it is given for only a week’s duration, and the whimsical ballroom scene is a great success. Marjorie McEwan plays the part of Cinderella, and adds to the good opinion she has created during recent months. Thomas Reynor is as good as ever in the role of the Policeman, and it is upon these two that the bulk of the work falls. John Blake and Isla Garnet-Vayne are good as the King and Queen, and the other parts are well presented’. The Stage, 3 January 1935.
7 Jan 1935 Her Majesty's Theatre, CarlisleAmateur
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The Penrith Observer, 31 December 1934, advertised that Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella would be performed at Her Majesty’s Theatre, Carlisle, on 7-12 January 1935, in aid of the Boys’ Brigade (Carlisle Battalion), by Mr. Lionel Lightfoot’s Company.
27 Feb 1935 Tivoli, BuckleyAmateur
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‘Members of the Hawarden County School Old Scholars’ Dramatic Society gave a fine presentation of “A Kiss For Cinderella” in the Tivoli Theatre, Buckley, on Wednesday and Thursday. This was the 15th annual performance under the same producer, Mr. E. G. Lawson. There were three acts. Mrs. Gerald Jones, as Cinderella, was a great success. There are 23 characters in the play. The dances were arranged by Miss D. Griffiths. There was a fine orchestra, under the leadership of Mr. F. Roberts, B.Sc., with Mr. E. Owen Spain as leader’. Cheshire Observer, Saturday 2 March 1935.
21 Mar 1935 Newport Secondary School for Girls, NewportSchool
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‘“A Kiss for Cinderella,” a play in three acts by Sir James Barrie, was presented by pupils of the Newport Secondary School for Girls at the school-hall on Thursday evening. The play was produced by Miss E. J. Cleaver and Miss M. E. Davies’. Western Mail, Friday 22 March 1935.
2 Dec 1935 Crane Hall, Hanover Street, LiverpoolAmateur
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The Liverpool Echo, 30 November 1935, listed among forthcoming productions A Kiss for Cinderella by the St. Anthony’s Players at the David Lewis Theatre [sic – see below] on 2 December. The Liverpool Echo, 7 December 1935, reviewed the production which took place at the Crane Hall (later the Neptune Theatre and the Epstein Theatre).
14 Dec 1935 Chorleywood College for Girls With Little or No Sight, ChorleywoodAmateur
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‘J. M. Barrie’s comedy, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” was given by the students of “Chorley Wood College for Girls with little or no sight,” on Saturday and Monday last. Known to many older residents in West Herts as “Chorley Wood Cedars,” the college is now one of the many notable sections of the work of the National Institute for the Blind. The play was given in the large Assembly Room. Despite the handicap that many of the performers had the acting was wonderfully good. Where all worked hard it is somewhat unfair to mention names, but we may be pardoned for saying that Doris John, as “Cinderella,” captivated everyone by her acting. At the close on Saturday evening Miss Upcott, in a short speech, expressed the pleasure of all present in a delightful entertainment’. Buckinghamshire Examiner, Friday 20 December 1935.
12 Dec 1936 Fosse Bank School, TonbridgeSchool
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‘The choice of a play for representation by school girls is always a matter of considerable difficulty since the ideal school play needs variety of interest, a large number of characters, much light and shade and contrast action and setting, and, if possible, pretty “period” costumes. Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” provides all these and does not date, in spite of the scene being laid during the war. The only difficulty it might present - that of two principal parts of great length and difficult to sustain - was easily overcome at Fosse Bank, Tonbridge, last Saturday by Elizabeth Blaxland as Cinderella and Brenda Downs as the Policeman’. Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser, Friday 18 December 1936. The pupils of Fosse Bank School had already performed the play in December 1928.
20 Apr 1937 St. Peter’s Hall, Upper TootingAmateur
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‘The R.A.C.S., Tooting, Dramatic Society showed no little ambition in their choice of this year’s production, J. M. Barrie’s play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” which they presented at St. Peter’s Hall, Beechcroft-road, Upper Tooting, on Tuesday. One of Mr. Barrie’s earlier efforts, the play is typical of that whimsical humour in which he specialises’. Norwood News, Friday 23 April 1937.
23 Jul 1937 Town Hall, PetersfieldSchool
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‘The performance of “A Kiss for Cinderella” by the girls of the Petersfield County High School in the Town Hall can well be regarded as the town’s tribute to the memory of the late Sir James M. Barrie, the famous playwright. This play was presented to a large audience, and the 22 members of the cast were all girls of the school. Particularly memorable was the delightful acting of M. Hayward who played the title role of Cinderella - one of the best pieces of amateur acting for a girl of her age seen in Petersfield’. Hampshire Telegraph, Friday 30 July 1937. The date shown is conjectural (the newspaper was published weekly on a Friday).
13 Dec 1937 Little Theatre, EdinburghSchool
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The Scotsman, 27 November 1937, advertised that the pupils of St. Denis School would perform Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella on 13 December at the Little Theatre, Edinburgh.
24 Dec 1937 Phoenix, LondonProfessional
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‘At the Phoenix Ronald Adam is to revive the late J. M. Barrie’s play “A Kiss for Cinderella,” at the Phoenix, on the afternoon of Christmas Eve. It will be played there for about a three-week season, and from the matinée on December 27 it will be given twice daily. Sebastian Shaw will be the Policeman and Glynis Johns, Cinderella. Other members of the cast will include Esmé Church, Elliot Makeham, J. Hubert Leslie, Bruce Winston, Richard Littledale, and Caroline Bailey. David Homan has designed the scenery. Murray Macdonald will produce the play. The last revival of this play in the West End was in 1924’. The Stage, 9 December 1937. The Times, 16 December 1937, advertised Sebastian Shaw in A Kiss for Cinderella at the Phoenix Theatre from Friday 24 December. It also reported that Glynis Johns would play Cinderella and that the play would be performed every afternoon and evening during its season of three to four weeks. ‘Barrie Fantasy. Imaginative Acting in “A Kiss for Cinderella.” From Our Own Correspondent, London, Thursday. Enjoyment of Sir James Barrie’s fantasy, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” which was attractively produced at the Phoenix Theatre to-day, is found to have been affected far more than “Peter Pan” ever could be by the passing of time. Containing references to the air raids which threatened London at the time of the play’s first production, and a slight antipathy to a German child who takes part in one scene, the fantasy is splendidly rescued from the dated piece it might have become by the sympathy of the acting and several scenes of a poignant beauty which only Barrie could have conceived. The last act rather laboriously emphasises the disappearance of class distinction through the agency of the war, but concludes with a tender love scene that shows brightly the fine poetic quality of the author’s mind. Cinderella this time is a member of a prosaic world in which policemen and pennies are more important than fairy godmothers and magic wands. The dream ball is there, however, and a most decorative and enjoyable affair it is - with ice cream and a king who talks the broadest cockney. Moments of quite moving pathos are charmingly acted by Glynis Johns as Cinderella, and Sebastian Shaw as her policeman lover, while other amusing and imaginative performances are given by J. Hubert Leslie, William Hutchison and Bruce Winston’. The Birmingham Daily Gazette, 24 December 1937. The same notice in the Nottingham Journal of the same date. The production was also reviewed in The Scotsman (24 December 1937), the Sheffield Independent (28 December 1937), the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer (28 December 1937: ‘Its references to wounded men and refugees may be obscure to a generation now growing up who already are asking “What did grandfather do in the Great War?”), The Era (30 December 1937: the play ‘may be a little dated in its war-time setting’), The Stage (31 December 1937), and the Buckinghamshire Examiner (31 December 1937). The Times, Saturday 15 January 1938, advertised the last two performances that day of A Kiss for Cinderella at the Phoenix Theatre.
25 Nov 1938 Leeds Girls' High School, LeedsSchool
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The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Thursday 24 November 1938, published a photograph of ‘Pupils of Leeds Girls’ High School rehearsing the wedding scene in “A Kiss for Cinderella,” to be produced by them to-morrow and on Saturday’. The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, 26 November 1938, published a review of the production.
12 Dec 1939 Leamington High School for Girls, Leamington SpaSchool
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‘Leamington High School for Girls. The Coventry Schools very kindly invited parties of girls to their play on Tuesday afternoon, “A Kiss for Cinderella,’ and to their variety entertainment, yesterday’. Leamington Spa Courier, Friday 15 December 1939.
20 Dec 1940 Town Hall, BallymenaSchool
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The Belfast News-Letter, Monday 23 December 1940, mentioned that the pupils of Cambridge House School, Ballymena, gave a performance of A Kiss for Cinderella at the annual prize-day at the Town Hall the previous Friday. The pupils of Cambridge House School, Ballymena, would perform the play again at the prize-day in December 1958.
24 Dec 1941 Q, Kew Bridge, LondonUnknown
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‘Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” is to be produced at the “Q” on Wednesday, December 24th, at 6.45 p.m., after which performances will be given twice daily at 2.30 and 6.45 p.m’. West London Observer, 12 December 1941. The Times (27 December 1941) and The Stage (1 January 1942) published reviews of the production. The Times was still advertising the production on Friday 2 January 1942. The closing date shown is conjectural.
21 Dec 1942 Perth Theatre, PerthProfessional
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‘Booking starts on Wednesday for the Christmas season, the first production being Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella,” on the week commencing December 21. This will be followed on December 28 by a fortnight’s run of the pantomime, “Babes in the Wood”’. Perthshire Advertiser, 5 December 1942. The Perthshire Advertiser, 19 December 1942, previewed the production: ‘This play of Barrie’s, though written during the last war, can never date, and in fact to-day it seems more applicable than ever’. The Perthshire Advertiser, 23 December 1942, reviewed the production.
12 Jan 1943 Repertory Theatre, DundeeProfessional
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‘Will Members please note that the Repertory Theatre will be closed on Mon., Jan. 11, in preparation for the production of J. M. Barrie’s great play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” starring Hollywood’s film actor, Peter Halliwell Hobbes, as guest artiste. The opening performance will be given on Tues., Jan. 12, and each succeeding evening at 7.15. Matinees, Wed., 2.30, and Sat., 4.30'. Dundee Courier, Saturday 9 January 1943. ‘“A Kiss For Cinderella,” by Sir J M. Barrie, continues at the Repertory Theatre. Principal roles are taken by Margaret Pepler, as the romantic servant girl, and Peter Halliwell-Hobbes, visiting artist, as her policeman lover’. The Dundee Evening Telegraph, 16 January 1943. The Dundee Evening Telegraph, Saturday 23 January 1943, advertised the following week’s production as ‘The Green Bay Tree’.
26 Dec 1944 John Gay Theatre, BarnstapleProfessional
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The John Gay Theatre, Barnstaple ‘will re-open on Boxing Day [Tuesday 26 December] with that very lively play “A Kiss for Cinderella,” by Sir James Barrie. This is one of the best Christmas plays, as distinct from pantomimes, ever written, and should appeal to of all ages, and to grown-ups as well. Regular patrons will be glad to know that many old friends will appear in this play, including Miss Dorothy Casey, Miss Frances Lovering, Miss Sylvia Haydn, and Miss Phyllis Gow; also Mr. Tony O’Hara and Mr. St. John Medley. Mr. Reginald Andrews … is coming down specially to play Mr. Bodie. The other two plays beginning on Wednesday, January 3rd. and Wednesday, January 10th, will be …’. North Devon Journal, Thursday 14 December 1944. The North Devon Journal, Thursday 28 December, advertised performances of A Kiss for Cinderella at the John Gay Theatre that day and on Friday and Saturday. ‘Under admirable arrangements made by the Chief Evacuation Officer for the borough, and his Staff, every evacuated child in Barnstaple has been specially catered for during Christmastide in one way or another … about 400 children over five years of age were taken to see the Barrie pantomime “A Kiss for Cinderella” at The John Gay Theatre on Wednesday of last week. The under-fives each received a greetings card with a shilling National Savings stamp’. North Devon Journal, 4 January 1945.
24 Mar 1945 Heath House School, WeybridgeSchool
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‘A sum of £11 15s. 6d. is being sent to the Red Cross as the result of the performance of Barrie’s play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” by pupils of Heath House School, Weybridge, on Saturday'. Surrey Advertiser, Saturday 31 March 1945.
27 Jan 1947 Parish Hall, Southgate, HornseaAmateur
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The Hull Daily Mail, 24 January 1947, advertised that the Hornsea People’s Theatre would present Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella on 27-30 January and 1 February at the Parish Hall, Southgate, Hornsea.
17 Dec 1947 Welfare Hall, Houghton-le-SpringAmateur
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The Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, Tuesday 16 December 1947, advertised that Houghton-le-Spring Drama Club would present Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella at the Welfare Hall, Houghton-le-Spring, on 17-20 December 1947.
24 Dec 1948 Q, Kew Bridge, LondonUnknown
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‘Esmé Percy is to produce “A Kiss for Cinderella” at the “Q” on Christmas Eve. Penelope Bartley plays Cinderella with John Westbrook as the Policeman. Others in the cast of over 40 include Philip Hollis, Geoffrey Wardwell, Iris Baker, Melissa Stribling, Robin Lloyd, and Laurence Naismith’. The Stage, 16 December 1948. The Fulham Chronicle, 17 December 1948, advertised that Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella would be performed at the Q Theatre from 24 December to 2 January. The Times (28 December 1948) and The Stage (31 December 1948) published reviews of the production.
10 Jan 1949 New Theatre, BromleyUnknown
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The Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser, 19 November 1948, advertised that A Kiss for Cinderella would be presented at the New Theatre, Bromley for two weeks commencing [Monday] 10 January.
28 Nov 1949 St. Stephen’s College, North ForelandAmateur
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‘Members of Broadstairs branch of the Old Age Pensioners Association on Monday afternoon enjoyed a play, “A Kiss for Cinderella,” presented by pupils of St. Stephen’s College, North Foreland’. Thanet Advertiser, Friday 2 December 1949.
8 Jan 1952 Hovel Theatre, Holland Park, LondonUnknown
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‘On January 8, at the Hovel Theatre, Holland Park, Neysa Grahame launched an ambitious production of J. M. Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella,”’ which succeeded unexpectedly well on such a small, shallow stage. The Cinderella of Esther Lawrence had a fey quality which was rather more conscious than spontaneous, but her Cockney-ism was well sustained. Victor Jay was delightful as the King, and Gerald Dawson brought just the right touch of simple romance to the Policeman, but the acting honours of the evening went to David Taylor, who doubled the parts of Mr. Bodie and the Lord Mayor, making each a character-gem. Good settings helped to provide atmosphere’. The Stage, 10 January 1952. The Kensington Post, Friday 18 January 1952, also published a review. The closing date shown is conjectural.
19 Dec 1958 Town Hall, BallymenaSchool
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The Ballymena Observer, Friday 26 December 1958, reported that the pupils of Cambridge House School, Ballymena, gave a performance of A Kiss for Cinderella at the annual prize-day in the Town Hall the previous week. Also the Ballymena Weekly Telegraph, 23 December 1958. The performance date shown (a Friday) is conjectural. The pupils of Cambridge House School, Ballymena, had previously performed the play at the prize-day in December 1940.
18 Dec 1962 Victoria Theatre, SalfordProfessional
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‘The Southport Repertory Company will make a start on “A Kiss For Cinderella” in the newly-renovated Victoria (Salford) [on 18 December]’. The Stage, 13 December 1962. ‘Many members of the Southport Repertory company, dispersed by the demolition of the Scala, have come together again under the veteran producer, Vint Graves, to present repertory in the re-opened Victoria Theatre, Salford. When the curtain went up there last week with a Christmas production of “A Kiss for Cinderella” it was the realisation of an old ambition for the Manchester business man Sam Goldberg. As a boy Mr. Goldberg saved his pocket money for a seat in the gallery of the Victoria. By the time it closed as a theatre he was in a position to buy the building and use it as a warehouse. But he never forgot the building’s real purpose. When the Southport Scala was pulled down and the resident company, of which he was a director, disbanded, earlier this year he decided to bring the Victoria back to life. Now the painters and decorators have gone, leaving the theatre with a fresh coat of blue, gold and pink pastel paint and equipped once more for its original role. The programme planned is ambitious but Vint Graves said last week: “There will be no highbrow stuff. Good wholesome entertainment with lots of drama, comedy and thrillers’. The Stage, 27 December 1962. The Stage, 3 January 1963, reviewed the production. The closing date shown is conjectural.
17 Oct 1977 Georgian Theatre, RichmondUnknown
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The Stage, 13 October 1977, listed a Kiss For Cinderella in Calls for 17 October at the Georgian Theatre, Richmond, Yorkshire. The closing date shown is conjectural.
7 Nov 1977 Thameside, GraysProfessional
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The Stage, 3 November 1977, reported, ‘Alan Clements is presenting a tour of J. M. Barrie’s “A Kiss for Cinderella” which opens at the Thameside, Grays next week, going on to Hatfield, Southsea, Pendle and Southport. In the cast are Terence Denville, Robert Boyd, June Gray, Simon Kelly, Elizabeth Stephens, Simone Francis, Christine Fox, Rita Gerza and Hugh Leadon. Stage management is by Michael Brydon and Nadio Fortune’.
14 Nov 1977 The Forum, HatfieldProfessional
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Hatfield is identified in The Stage, 3 November 1977, as the venue after Grays for Alan Clements’ touring production of A Kiss for Cinderella. ‘J. M. Barrie’s World War I fantasy “A Kiss for Cinderella” is a curious choice for a touring production, but Alan Clements’ revival, seen at Hatfield Forum, is a commendable attempt to find something different with which to entice parents and children to the smaller civic theatres. Though it is quite elaborately staged, particularly in the second act, which utilises children from local dancing schools, the underlying atmosphere, no doubt charming audiences during the 1914-18 conflict, is almost completely absent and modern children, not to mention their mothers and fathers, will be quite at a loss to understand its significance. If, indeed, there is any significance in this tale of a rootless girl who subsidises her charitable work out of her wages as a household skivvy, is befriended by a suspicious policeman and ends up in hospital with exposure after being found in the street following an imaginary ball in which her policeman was Prince Charming. This example of Barrie’s “little mother” fixation is neatly acted by June Gray as Cinderella, Terence Deville as both her employer and the agitated King and Robert Boyd as the simple-hearted policeman with an “infailable” (sic) test for determining a real lady. A more stylish production might bring more out of this unusual play’. The Stage, 24 November 1977.
21 Nov 1977 King's Theatre, SouthseaProfessional
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The Stage, 17 November 1977, listed a Kiss For Cinderella in Calls for 21 November at the King’s Theatre, Southsea.
28 Nov 1977 Municipal Hall, ColneProfessional
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The Stage, 24 November 1977, listed a Kiss For Cinderella in Calls for 28-30 November at the Municipal Hall, Colne and for 31 November (sic) to 2 December at the Civic Theatre, Nelson.
1 Dec 1977 Civic Theatre, NelsonUnknown
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The Stage, 24 November 1977, listed a Kiss For Cinderella in Calls for 28-30 November at the Municipal Hall, Colne and for 31 November (sic) to 2 December at the Civic Theatre, Nelson: the dates shown are conjectural but assume a three-day visit to Nelson as The Stage implies.
5 Dec 1977 Arts Centre, SouthportProfessional
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The Liverpool Echo, Friday 25 November 1977, advertised ‘Alan Clements Productions Present J. M. Barrie’s Delightful Fantasy A Kiss for Cinderella’ at the Southport Arts Centre on 5-12 (sic – 5-10) December. The Liverpool Echo, Friday 2 December 1977, advertised ‘All Next Week Alan Clements Productions Present “A Kiss for Cinderella” by J. M. Barrie’ at the Southport Arts Centre.