Great War Theatre

Address: Bristol, UK

Performances at this Theatre

DateScriptType
8 Feb 1926 The New WordProfessional
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‘The [Bristol] Little Theatre Company this week are reviving three plays by Sir James M. Barrie, each of which bring back - to many at least - vivid recollections of those crowded days of campaigning. The mystery, the fantasy, the inscrutable, is each exemplified in these three pieces, and the infinite artistry of the master of stagecraft, and of diction, protrudes itself from practically very line in “The New Word,” “The Old Lady Shows Her Medals,” and “A Well-remembered Voice.” The first of the plays gave Little Theatre patrons … an excellent idea of the possibilities of casting under the new régime, for Edith Sharpe, as Roger’s mother; Peter Taylor Smith, as his father; Merle Tottenham, as his sister; and William Freshman, as Roger Torrance, were each well placed, and did credit to their respective parts’. Western Daily Press, Tuesday 9 February 1926.
8 Feb 1926 A Well-Remembered VoiceUnknown
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‘The [Bristol] Little Theatre Company this week are reviving three plays by Sir James M. Barrie, each of which bring back - to many at least - vivid recollections of those crowded days of campaigning. The mystery, the fantasy, the inscrutable, is each exemplified in these three pieces, and the infinite artistry of the master of stagecraft, and of diction, protrudes itself from practically very line in “The New Word,” “The Old Lady Shows Her Medals,” and “A Well-remembered Voice.” … In “A Well-remembered Voice,” Alfred Brooks gave [a] well-finished representation of Mr. Don; William Freshman is to be congratulated upon gathering the “atmosphere,” as the ghost of Dick; and Kathleen Alcock was sympathetically charming as Laura’. Western Daily Press, Tuesday 9 February 1926.
1 Mar 1926 SearchlightsProfessional
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The Western Daily Press, Friday 26 February 1926, advertised H. A. Vachell’s Searchlights at the Little Theatre, Bristol the following week. ‘When he wrote “Searchlights,” a clever play in three acts, Horace A. Vachell dived deeply into the complexities of human nature. The passions and frailties of men and women was the axle on which the wheel of the piece turned, but the evenness of the running is either made or marred by those whose work is to present it. The production lends itself to powerful acting, indeed its success rests upon the capacity of the players to interpret the author’s conception correctly. Good acting without sympathy would be unsatisfactory, but last evening the members of the Little Theatre company gave as delightful a presentation of the play as one could wish for. The characters are all so widely different in their traits that weakness in any one would be fatal. The strength of the play lies in the ability of the artists to portray weakness and strength, love and hatred at will, and this was what those who were present were entertained with. The story concerns a stern British capitalist who made a marriage of convenience, and how after years of trial and strife complete reconciliation was created. There is a pretty little love passage running through the play, and some quiet but none the less keen humour. Peter Taylor-Smith’s Robert Blaine the capitalist, a stern, unbending British parent, was admirably given, and Miss Edith Sharpe certainly scored another success as Mrs Blaine, a part in which she was given ample scope for her artistry. As the son, William Freshman made a hit with his confident and nonchalant manner. Ralph Hutton has done few better things than his presentation of Sir Adalbert Schmaltz, the German capitalist of Scottish descent, whose good nature and geniality was in marked contrast to the sombre and severe bearing of his friend Blaine. The gentle Lady Schmaltz was most capably played by Miss Marjorie Fielding, whilst Phoebe, the daughter, gave Miss Kathleen Alcock but another opportunity of displaying her powers. They were the principal characters, but in a lesser degree Miss Janet Morrison, Noel Morris, Donald Gordon, and Max Jerome gave them excellent support’ (Western Daily Press, 2 March 1926). Noted in The Stage, 4 March 1926.
26 Dec 1927 A Kiss For CinderellaProfessional
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The Western Daily Press, 20 July 1927, reported that Barrie’s A Kiss for Cinderella would be performed from Monday 26 December to Wednesday 4 January 1928 at the Little Theatre. Also the Western Daily Press, 6 September 1927. The Western Daily Press, 21 December 1927, published a preview of the production. It named the principals as: Cinderella, Janet Morrison; The Policeman, Clive Morton; Mr. Bodie, Ralph Hutton; The Queen, Joan Ingram; The King, Mervyn Johns; Dr. Bodie, Gipsy Ellis; and Fairy Godmother, Paula Trevanion. The Western Daily Press, 27 and 30 December 1927, published reviews of the production.
3 Feb 1930 The Luck Of The NavyUnknown
13 Apr 1931 A Kiss For CinderellaProfessional
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The Western Daily Press, 12 December 1930, mentioned the forthcoming production. The Western Daily Press, 9 April 1931, advertised the production. On 10 April it published a preview and on 14 April a review.