Great War Theatre

Examiner of Plays' Summary:

A spirited little didactic sketch, preaching the need for doing something more for the country than seeking highly paid government work at munitions; and also hinting out the mischievous folly of saying that ‘we have got the Germans beat’. The sermon is preached by a wounded Tommy who returns home to his father, mother, brothers, and friends, to find that they are taking what he holds to be a wrong view of their personal responsibilities - though it is, he admits, the view taken by himself before he learned in the trenches what war really means. A vigorous and useful piece of work. Recommended for license. Ernest A. Bendall.

Licensed On: 18 Nov 1916

License Number: 584

British Library Reference: LCP1916/28

British Library Classmark: Add MS 66149 M

Performances

DateTheatreType
22 Nov 1916 Empire, ChiswickProfessional Licensed Performance
26 Nov 1916 Empire, ChiswickProfessional
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This was the first performance of the play on any stage. 'It is eminently fitting that the question of economy, now so prominent, should presented to the public on the stage. Many will thus be reached, and it is to be hoped impressed, who may be deaf to other appeals. The thing has indeed already been done. But last week a new sketch dealing with the topic was running at the Chiswick Empire. Its title “My Superior Officer,” and its author Mr. Michael Morton. It presents wounded but convalescent soldier, home from the front, earnestly exhorting his own family to add economy and war saving —i.e., tho purchase of War Savings Certificates to all that they have already done in munition work and in other ways. The play is essentially word in season.' (Era, 29 November 1916)
4 Dec 1916 London Opera House, LondonProfessional
18 Dec 1916 Pavillion, GlasgowProfessional
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Other acts on bill: Laddie Cliff. Americas Leading Vaudeville Artist Advert states "The London Cast will appear" , Daily Record Glasgow